Has anyone ever tried this before?

Dog Food Advisor Forums Off Topic Forum Has anyone ever tried this before?

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  • #93369 Report Abuse

    Krista B
    Member

    Hi,

    I just figured out a great little trick! I took a 1/3 of a cup of kibble and 1/2 cup of hot but not boiling water and 1 tbsp. of fruitables digestive supplement and let it soak for about 2- 2 1/2 hours. The kibble soaked up about 60-70% of the water and I was left with a pumpkin gravy. I took a fork and mashed up the kibble into the gravy and it turned into basically what resembled canned food. How awesome is this? Now I can make canned food at home for a fraction of the cost! It really does resemble (and smell) like a pate type canned food. I will now be doing this for all my dogs meals. I really recommend trying this, it’s helpful because it really breaks down the kibble and adds moisture so it’s easier for the dog to digest.

    #93370 Report Abuse

    Krista B
    Member

    The brands I used to try this were: Fromm four star line, Acana regionals and Natural Balance. The Natural Balance actually soaked up about 90% of the water which was really impressive. The other two soaked up about 60-70% of the water.

    #93372 Report Abuse

    anonymous
    Member

    Per the search engine : https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/presoak+kibble/

    It depends on the dog and their individual needs, I have done this for elderly dogs. However, I don’t measure the water or add supplements and I tend to stick with one brand of kibble that I know agrees with the dog.
    I also always add a protein topper and a splash of water.

    #93376 Report Abuse

    anonymous
    Member

    The kibbles that get the softest/mushiest after being soaked in water are usually the cheaper more sawdust like ones. The kibbles that tend to stay firm even after being soaked in water are denser and therefore may be better in quality and nutrition.
    However, if your dog does best on a bland diet, I might be inclined to stick with the more mushy kibble. Just my opinion.
    Example: cheerios vs granola, after sitting in milk for 10 minutes.
    It all depends on the specific dietary needs of the individual involved as to which would be best.

    #93377 Report Abuse

    Krista B
    Member

    Thanks, yes I tend to favor the Acana and Fromm over the Natural Balance. I just had some leftover Natural Balance in the pantry from a while ago. I don’t like that Natural Balance uses over 50% potatoes/carbs. I still think Orijen is one of the best brands available.

    #93379 Report Abuse

    anonymous
    Member

    Be careful with having multiple bags of kibble open at the same time. They go bad. I only open one bag at a time and store in tightly closed containers in the fridg. In a pantry I wouldn’t trust anything after 2 weeks. In the fridg, maybe a month to 6 weeks. That’s it.

    #93381 Report Abuse

    Krista B
    Member

    Yes, thanks. At the moment Ihree small bags open. I do not plan on doing this again because it takes me a month just to use one. I agree after a month it’s probably not as good. (unless it’s been in the fridge or freezer) do you think it’s still ok to feed dry kibble? Or should I always soak it. I noticed my dog just doesn’t drink a lot of water. She only goes to the bowl maybe a couple times per day and just drinks a few sips each time. (I’m guessing she might be only drinking 1/2 cup per day total) And that’s when I’m not event hydrating her food. When I’m hydrating it I actually hardly ever see her go to the bowl. Is this normal for an otherwise healthy dog?

    #93382 Report Abuse

    anonymous
    Member

    Some dogs don’t drink enough water, so, to be on the safe side, I add a splash, maybe about a 1/4th cup to their meals (twice a day). Dry kibble with a tablespoon of a protein topper.
    Seems to be working, so far. Just always have fresh water available, and offer frequent bathroom breaks.
    They (dogs) are all different, that’s why the annual checkup with the vet and occasional lab work (as recommended) is important.

    #93384 Report Abuse

    Krista B
    Member

    Yes I agree. She’s had all her yearly checkups and has no health issues. But she had never had any bloodwork done yet. She’s currently 4 1/2 so her next visit would be an appropriate time for that. I also get her teeth cleaned yearly. The breed is prone to terrible teeth. Luckily her teeth aren’t that bad.

    #93385 Report Abuse

    anonymous
    Member

    Most vets recommend lab work prior to dental cleanings. I suppose you could decline the lab work and sign a waiver.
    What kind of dental cleaning are you talking about?
    Never mind. Just go by what your vet recommends. I find that is the best way to go.

    #93393 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    I never do anything that requires my dog to undergo anesthesia without prior bloodwork. I’d want to know in advance if there is any problem. My oldest dog is almost 11, needs a dental but at his age, I’m afraid 🙁

    #93396 Report Abuse

    pitlove
    Member

    A customer of ours at work was an anesthesiologist for 20 years and told me blood work is not necessary before each and every surgical procedure. Age and health of the patient certainly is a factor for whether or not blood work should be done of course.

    #93397 Report Abuse

    Naturella
    Member

    Hi, Krista!

    I feed my dog Bruno “soups” for every meal. He gets his dry kibble and a topper that varies at each meal, whether it is canned food, dehydrated/freeze-dried raw, or some other topper, such as coconut or fish oil, yoghurt/kefir/goat milk, raw egg, or canned sardines, and add warm water, stir it all together, and serve him the soup. He loves it! He has been eating soups for years now, precisely because of the added hydration.

    #93399 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    PitLuv,
    I can understand that if a dog has procedures often but mine don’t.

    #93400 Report Abuse

    anonymous
    Member

    @ InkedMarie,
    As long as the pre-op labs are within normal limits and the heart sounds good, I wouldn’t worry too much. I would be more concerned about infection/pain and all that jazz that can happen with untreated periodontal disease.
    My small breed had 2 surgeries at age 11, one was for a late in life neuter due to a testicular tumor. I declined the labs and signed the waiver.
    The other was for emergency surgery due to bladder stones, labs were slightly off but it wasn’t a concern as this is often the case with seniors. He also had an asymptomatic heart murmur. Both times he came through fine and lived 5 more years.
    They have dental specialists and geriatric specialists for dogs now too, if it would make you feel better to seek one out.

    #93401 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    Boone does have a heart murmur that hasn’t caused any problems. He’s had a few dentals in the past almost 11yrs & was neutered. He hasnt had bloodwork for 2 or 3 yrs, need to check the paperwork but if we opt for a dental, I would do it, just in case.

    I dont know if you remember that we had a senior that we had named Katie…she was the obese girl with a ton of healthy issues that we adopted (not to be confused with Gemma, the last senior sheltie). She was 13 & developed a hemangiopericytoma, darn thing grew overnight. Had to remove it & she did fine. Scary though, to have her put under.

    #95796 Report Abuse

    lora p
    Member

    Wow, I’m definitely gonna try this. Thanks for your valuable post.

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