Tests for Skin allergies from the enviornment….

Dog Food Advisor Forums Diet and Health Tests for Skin allergies from the enviornment….

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  • #56336 Report Abuse
    Susan
    Member

    Has anyone had their dog tested for skin allergies such as hive like lumps all over their body, itchy ears, sore swollen throat, running nose, sneezing etc, I know that these are a enviornment allergies as we have just come into spring here in Australia, a season I’m starting to dislike, I dont believe in blood test for food Allergies BUT are enviornment allergies test done..
    Has any dog owners had environment allergies test done or is it the same test as they do for food allergies & what sort of test were done on their dogs & about how much did it cost & was it worth doing, as we cant stop all the pollens, grasses etc outside..
    I’m just curious as Im seeing his vet this afternoon as there’s been something wrong with Patches throat since friday morning after having a morning spew of acid, at first I thought that the stomach acid had burnt his throat making it very sore, when he brought up all the yellow acid but its Wednesday he should of gotten better by now, he’s been waking me up thru the night & making these wierd swollowing noises like something is stuck in his throat & just starring at me like something is wrong…. Ive put him back on his Losec 10mg daily for the stomach reflux again, The Losec has stopped him eating grass every morning like he’s been doing all last week…but he’s still got his sore throat….
    Do enviornment allergies cause swollon throat?? I know foods can cause these symptoms, so I’ve stopped all extra foods & put him back on his vet diet only since Friday….has anyone experience these symptoms with their dogs? If so what did you do?

    #57004 Report Abuse
    Jenna P
    Member

    Try http://www.dynamicnutritionanalysis.com/pet-report.html its a hair sample test, you simply mail in 4 pieces of hair, they test the hair against 600+ food and non food items, plus can test for vitamin deficiencies. You can also send in 5 different types of kibble, they will see which one is best suited to your dog but giving you an intolerance percentage.
    This test helped me an my allergy ridden dogs!

    #57029 Report Abuse
    Kristin C
    Member

    Susan-so sorry for your guy. Have you thought about trying an elimination diet? Novelty proteins (rabbit, duck, quail, etc.) plus veggies, to see what bothers him? We live in the U.S. and our dogs get sneezy and eye boogery too, usually environmental. We feed mostly raw, little kibble and freeze dried, so they don’t get used to any one thing.

    #80240 Report Abuse
    Cassandra T
    Member

    Please disregard this post of young living. Its not valid yet.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 1 month ago by Cassandra T.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 1 month ago by Cassandra T.
    #80243 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    The best choice would be to see a board-certified veterinary dermatologist, if one is available near you (here is a list: http://www.acvd.org/).

    Most dermatologists will not skin test for allergies until the dog has been exhibiting symptoms for 1 year/4 seasons without any significant periods of relief. There are also other treatment options that a specialist could offer.

    A summary of treatments for canine atopy:
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2010/06/evidence-based-canine-allergy-treatment/
    And here is a recent update:
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2015/10/evidence-update-evidence-based-canine-allergy-treatment/
    More info here:
    http://www.2ndchance.info/allergytesting.htm
    Skin tests to determine what your pet might be allergic to are considerably more accurate, on the whole, than blood tests. However, they are not 100% accurate either. To have them performed, you will need to locate a board certified veterinary dermatologist

    excerpt below from: http://www.2ndchance.info/Apoquel.htm
    Food Allergies are probably over-diagnosed in dogs (they account for, perhaps 5-10%). Hypoallergenic diets are occasionally, but not frequently, helpful in canine atopy cases but you should always give them a try. Food intolerances are more common – but considerably more likely to result in digestive disturbances and diarrhea than in itching problems.

    via search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    Another site: http://www.allergydogcentral

    #80244 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Correction to link for AllergyDog Central http://www.allergydogcentral.com/category/symptoms/

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