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RRLOVER

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  • in reply to: Favourite Dog Food #148626 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Kathleen C -when our one dogs fractured his carnassial (the big molar) and had to have it removed , the veterinary dentists suggested that we just soak his kibble overnight in water in the refrigerator. The kibble maintained its shape but was soft enough that it didn’t scrape his sutures. He healed perfectly.

    This might be an option for you if expenses are tight and you don’t really want to change foods.

    RRLOVER
    Member

    I’m so sorry about your dog.

    What are you feeding? Dogs with PLE require a low fat to utra low fat diet.

    in reply to: find Good diet #141966 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Joanne,

    I don’t know which “Purina Lamb and Rice” you are feeding but the dry Purina Pro Plan Savor Shredded Lamb and Rice, Purina One Lamb and Rice, and Purina Beyond Simply 9 Lamb and Barley ALL contain CHICKEN.

    Pro Plan Sensitive Stomach and Skin Lamb and Oatmeal doesn’t appear to have chicken as an ingredient, so maybe that’s the one you’re using? It does contain eggs and SOME dogs with chicken allergies MAY also react to chicken eggs, though this isn’t a given in all cases. Maybe your dog is fine with eggs.

    Just figured I’d point this out, in case it helps.

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #141646 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Thank you JOSEPH G for that link!

    Embedded in the article is a link to the full list of all dog and cat DCM reports submitted to FDA -CVM from 1/1/2014 to 4/30/2019.

    in reply to: CHEERIOS ALTERNATIVE ADVICE #138720 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Probably the easiest thing to do is to buy a certified organic non-GMO version of “cheerios”. You could google something like “organic versions of Cheerios”. They *should* have less pesticides than conventional cereals.

    You could also add a little straight organic non-GMO oatmeal and skip the processed cereal, since dogs don’t really need sugar.

    If this is a matter of fiber supplementation (and not something specific to oats), and you’re uneasy even about organic oats, you could try a different source of fiber. You could ask your vet what type of fiber your dog needs, how much, and look for something that supplies it.

    Sometimes you get worse stool until you figure out the right balance of fibers and the quantities. . I’d Start with small amounts and slowly adjust.

    These are just a few thoughts, hope it helps! Good luck.

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 3 weeks ago by RRLOVER. Reason: Typo
    in reply to: Grain Free #136506 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    I appreciate this thread and everyone’s continued input regarding the reality of this problem.

    Goldens4ever, I am sorry to hear about your pup. Posts from people with affected dogs are particularly important as they help us all to accept the reality of the problem.

    in reply to: The Honest Kitchen New Product #133852 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    To be “honest”, I like the concept of the Honest Kitchen dehydrated foods, but I’ve been less than impressed with how my dogs dogs digest the food and also with the company’s lack of ability to answer my questions. They told me they get back to me when they had an answer and it’s been since 1/2018.

    The website says this food was “Created with a veterinary nutritionist”, but I wonder then why this “grain free”, “boutique” food has potatoes (#2), peas (#3), and lentils (#5) as main ingredients. I don’t know why any veterinary nutritionist would design a food like this given the recent diet-related DCM FDA warnings, unless the food was already designed and paid for before the FDA warning.

    It’d be nice if a company that supposedly cares about ingredient quality actually cared about the health and safety of our animals.

    in reply to: lawsuits against Orjien/Acana #130724 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    This particular lawsuit seems to be with regard to elevated levels of heavy metals in the Champion food.

    The lawsuit doesn’t mention anything about diet-related DCM.

    Just something to think about.

    in reply to: Prescription Diet and pooping too much? #130318 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Smucker’s bought Natural Balance almost 4 years ago (3/2015).

    RRLOVER
    Member

    Thanks for posting this Susan!

    in reply to: What’s your take on this from the FDA #125402 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Has anyone heard of any cases of taurine deficient DCM in dogs eating a grain free, potato-based,prescription veterinary diet, such as the novel protein diets made by RC (PW, PD, PV) and Hills (d/d line)?

    RRLOVER
    Member

    I don’t know if this is true, but I recently read that MSM can “enhance [naturally occuring] cortisol”.

    I wonder if it can possibly cause side-effects similar to an oral steroid. Has anyone noticed these sorts of side effects (peeing more, drinking more, etc.) when using Dasuquin with MSM?

    in reply to: ********************* #99497 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    The “nutritional value” rating disappeared.

    in reply to: Small Kibble Size #96100 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Fromm Salmon a la Veg kibble is about the size of a lentil, and is not specifically labeled for small breeds. Not sure about other flavors, but you could probably call/email them and ask, or even feel the kibble through the bag. It’s definitely the smallest non-small breed labeled dog kibble I’ve seen.

    in reply to: THK Perfect Form for IBD? #89683 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Hello Jenn H, sorry to hear about your IBD pup.

    One of my dogs has confirmed IBD (endoscopy with biopsy) and before we saw the specialist and got him into remission, I did try Perfect Form for a few months. It didn’t seem to do anything, either good or bad. Same thing with pure slippery elm tea. Perhaps these things can help some dogs, but they didn’t seem to help my IBD dog.

    Good luck!

    in reply to: annamaet possibly combining with TotW #86233 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Just as a reminder, whatever you choose, make sure that the calcium:phosphorus ratio is appropriate for large breed puppy growth.

    in reply to: Dealing with bowel disease – please help! #85296 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Hi Heather,

    I also have an IBD dog, confirmed by biopsy via endoscopy.

    You aren’t a “crazy pet parent” for worrying about low appetite in an IBD dog. Low appetite in an IBD dog can indicate that the inflammation isn’t totally under control with the new diet. I would say its worth mentioning to your specialist, particularly if it doesnt totally resolve, or continues to repeat itself. In my experience it’s always better to ask an expert.

    There’s also a yahoo group for people with dogs with IBD, IBDogs.

    GREG – if I recall correctly you posted here a few months ago, when the IBD/PLE worsened? I’m so sorry for your loss.

    in reply to: Inflamed Bowel Disease Diet Reommendations #83125 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    This is wonderful news! I’m so glad Maddie is doing better. Kudos to YOU for taking such good care of her!

    in reply to: Inflamed Bowel Disease Diet Reommendations #82941 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Hi Greg,

    Sending healing thoughts to you and Maddie! The liver problem sounds complicated, hopefully the change in medications does the trick.

    in reply to: Inflamed Bowel Disease Diet Reommendations #82909 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Hi Greg, so sorry about Maddie. My dog also has IBD (confirmed via biopsy).

    Dogs with PLE (“low albumin/protein”) need A very LOW FAT high protein diet. Smaller more frequent meals (like 4- 5 a day) with a slightly larger total daily food volume can also sometimes help. Your vet might be able to suggest a specific diet.

    Hope Maddie feels better soon.

    in reply to: Vet vs Dogfood Advisor #81316 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Hills and Royal Canin are not the same company.

    in reply to: Underweight husky German Shepard mix #76723 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Hi Brianna-

    So Sorry! I re-read your original post and I now realize that you were hoping someone would have good information on homemade raw diets, and not necessarily looking for suggestions about pancreatic issues. It is probably true that unless your dog also has SIBO or low B12 he may not need antibiotics or B12 supplementation, but it’s worth asking your vet as these things could be reducing his appetite.

    When my dog was having major digestive issues (which turned out to be IBD) I came across an informative website: epi4dogs.com. If you haven’t seen it, I recommend it.

    Hopefully someone with more information on raw diets will respond. I do know that if not feeding bone, you must supplement calcium.

    Again, so sorry for misunderstanding. Hope your vet gets back to you soon and your pup starts eating!

    in reply to: Underweight husky German Shepard mix #76713 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Has your dog been tested for Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency (EPI)?

    EPI is pretty common in German Shepherds, but other dogs can get it too. Dogs with EPI lack the ability to produce the correct level of digestive enzymes and they are basically starving. It can be diagnosed with a blood test and it can be controlled with appropriate porcine digestive enzymes, diet, and sometimes antibiotics and/or B12. The kind of digestive enzymes you can buy in the store usually aren’t enough, so you need to work with your vet. Just changing the diet is also not enough.

    If he has tested positive for EPI and is being treated, something needs to be adjusted in terms of enzymes, diet or medications. Every dog is a little different.

    Ask your vet. Good luck!

    in reply to: Diagnosed with IBD – What's Next??? #76644 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Hi Jack- I’m sorry about your Mojo. IBD is no fun. What’s next? That depends on a lot of things, but with the right care there is hope for a good quality of life.

    My boy was diagnosed with lymphoplasmacytic IBD of his small intestine and colon via endoscopy with biopsy almost a year and a half ago. He was only a year and a half old and his symptoms started when he was 4-5 months old.

    One thing our internal medicine specialist stressed to us from the beginning is that IBD is a lifelong autoimmune disease and while it can be managed, it cannot (yet) be cured. Even if you get Mojo into remission, he may continue to be very sensitive and flares may happen. So be prepared for a few ups and downs.

    At this point, I would do as your specialist recommends with regard to diet and supplements. The use of probiotics in this disease is common and can be beneficial, but again, ask your specialist for a recommendation. The best diet is the diet on which your dog has the fewest symptoms, maintains good body condition and energy, and needs the least amount of medication. Sometimes it takes a few tries to find the right combination of everything. It takes patience and time and everyone in your dog’s life needs to strictly follow the plan.

    With regard to Mojo’s weight, some dogs can take a month or more to regain after starting prednisone.

    There is a yahoo group called ibdogs which is especially for people with dogs with confirmed IBD. There are a lot of caring people with lots of experience in the group and its worth a look if only to get a real sense of what this disease entails. You have to apply for membership by completing a short questionnaire.

    Take care and good luck.

    RRLOVER
    Member

    Good! :).

    RRLOVER
    Member

    Hi Mondo,
    Just following up on your puppy. Is he/she ok? Hope so.

    in reply to: Desperate for help! Vomits every day :( #46952 Report Abuse
    RRLOVER
    Member

    Dear Lisa C.- I agree with Sue66b’s suggestion that this could be inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We went through a similar experience with our puppy starting when he was only about 4/5 months old. It began with chronic early morning vomit on an empty stomach and progressed to bloody vomit, pronounced borborygmi, vomiting of food, chronic loose stool with mucus, and recurrent hemmorhagic gastroenteritis. We tried various diets, even homemade, and different therapies but nothing seemed to really help long term. We finally saw an internal medicine veterinary specialist and our boy was diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease of his small intestine and colon upon biopsy via endoscopy (the “camera”). The specialist explained that while the correct diet is very important, sometimes there is so much inflammation that the right food ALONE can’t eliminate that inflammation. Inflammation of the GI tract inhibits nutrient absorption, which is why these dogs can become thin. Knowing what my boy has and having the right support for him has made a world of difference in his quality of life. He is currently in remission and is doing great!

    I really don’t know if Chewy has IBD or something else, and I know it’s expensive but I honestly think you should listen to your vet and pursue an accurate diagnosis. Biopsy of the GI mucosa is vital as IBD cannot be diagnosed by X-ray, blood tests, fecal tests, or even sometimes ultrasound. You need to do the right tests to get answers and neither your vet nor you can help Chewy unless you do those tests. Just my humble opinion. 🙂

Viewing 27 posts - 1 through 27 (of 27 total)