Dog Food Advisor Forums Sanne

Sanne

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  • in reply to: food too expensived #142470 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Canned food is typically much more expensive to feed than dry food. I would ask your vet to switch him to the dry version and you can put it in a food processor to turn it into a powder, then mix some warm water to it. It’s a little bit more work but worth it if cost is an issue.

    in reply to: Senior Supplements #141232 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Hmm sorry if this double posts… my post disappeared after submitting

    Senior foods really do not have anything special about them compared to adult foods. In fact, the label will usually state something along the lines of “complete and balanced for maintenance of adult dogs” even on senior foods.

    Some differences in senior foods can include added glucosamine and chondroitin but you are already using a joint supplement anyway. Some lower the fat and calories because some dogs become less active as they age so may gain weight on higher fat/calorie foods. Some will also have lower phosphorus levels so the food is easier on their aging kidneys. None of Purina’s foods are particularly high in phosphorus though so you would not need to worry about an even lower amount unless your dog has current kidney issues. Some will also lower the sodium level for aging hearts, but again Purina’s foods typically are not that high anyway. If your dog had a heart or kidney issue due to old age that needed these nutrients lowered, you would be best off with a prescription food than a senior food. Because NONE of these things are actually a requirement to label a food as “Senior” so feeding a senior food would not even guarantee any of these benefits.

    Most healthy seniors can stay on their original adult food for the rest of their life

    The only supplements are personally use for my oldies are CBD oil for joint pain and CoQ10 for heart health. I do not bother with supplements much unless my dogs have a specific issue that needs to be addressed.

    in reply to: oat groats?? #140111 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Joanne, you asked for people’s opinions and Anon gave you their’s. Your response: “Please I know what I am saying and the nutritionist did say too much hard to digest fiber.“ If you think you know all about it already and supposedly already got a “nutritionist’s” opinion on it, why are you asking for other opinions if you are just going to argue and say you know more when someone does not agree with you?

    And digestibility of any ingredient raw is not going to be the same once processed…

    in reply to: Fromm dog food #139723 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Completely agree with Anon. Sounds like your dog would probably benefit from a prescription diet. I have nothing else to say on the matter anymore

    in reply to: Fromm dog food #139716 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Was it liquid or just a bit soft? It’s not uncommon for sensitive dogs to have a soft stool or two after having something new introduced. If it was just soft you could still try adding a small amount to his regular food to see if he gets used to it. Soft stool is nothing to be too worried about when trying something new. You need to give it about week to let his system get used to it. If the stool is watery/liquid then yes I would discontinue the new food completely and not bother with it

    in reply to: Fromm dog food #139714 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    It seems like every time you post you are trying a new food. I don’t see how you determine whether your dog will do good on any of these foods or not. Like Anon said, it typically takes a few weeks to determine that.

    I cannot imagine all your constant switching and adding new things is very helpful if your dog is supposedly so sensitive and does not tolerate much. If you have found a food that he can tolerate leave it at that. If he truly has that many issues with so many brands it’s not worth it to constantly switch and add things just to please his taste. I’m all for feeding a food that my dog likes but sometimes like in your dog’s case that might just not be plausible. Put the food down and nothing else, stop bribing him and he will eat it when he is hungry. He will quickly learn that that food is all he gets. Stick with the food he does good on. You put your dog through a lot of digestive stress because you are so indecisive.

    Good luck to you and your dog

    in reply to: Top Recommended Dry Foods #139160 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Except she should not have because that would still be false. Maybe I am missing it somewhere, but I have yet to see any of those companies talk much about this DCM issue publicly. Can’t find much of anything on their own websites, social media, or commercials. If it were true that they are spreading it, I would expect to see them advertise all over the place that their food does not cause DCM. So far, the only people I am seeing bring up their food is concerned Cardiologists who have noticed patterns.

    in reply to: Top Recommended Dry Foods #139158 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    haha I am picturing Purina reps breaking into dog food factories and injecting the food with some kind of DCM causing virus

    in reply to: Top Recommended Dry Foods #139156 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    lol here is another gem directly quoted from that store’s post “To the people who are “in the know”, this issue is obviously being driven by manufacturers like Science Diet, Royal Canin, and Purina.”

    in reply to: Purina dog food #139148 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    You keep bringing this up. I explained to you why you might find bugs in dry food and now you have two more people who have also explained it to you. I don’t get it. Why do you keep bringing it up? Move on and feed something you are comfortable with instead of dwelling on one single brand. It is confusing

    in reply to: Top Recommended Dry Foods #139114 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Yes, even non grain free Fromm has cases. And contrary to the post above, there have been a few cases with raw fed dogs too, not just kibble fed dogs.

    This is happening with all kinds of breeds of all sizes. And not just simply on grain free foods. According to the studies done so far, all we know is the food is a major factor but not WHY the food is causing this. One study (I think from UC Davis?) showed that all but one of the dogs in the study that had diet caused DCM improved after changing the diet, something that is not possible with genetic DCM. That alone says a lot.

    I also do not trust any source that states “we know for a fact corn and wheat have no benefits to dogs..” it’s laughable considering we have numerous studies on the specific nutrients dogs utilize from corn gluten meal. Does it make it a necessary ingredient? No, but it sure makes it obvious someone likes to ignore science when making such a sweeping statement…

    in reply to: Fromm dog food #139113 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Okay? When live moths/larvae are in a food, that shows there is a storage problem. You realize live bugs don’t just emerge out of dog food because they were baked into the food? During storage before purchasing, moths are eating their way into the bags and laying eggs. This can occur in any dry food, no brand is immune to it.

    Your dog did not do good on it, that’s fine. Move on and feed something else. I don’t see why you are trying to look for other irrelevant problems for a food you don’t want to feed.

    in reply to: Fromm dog food #139090 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Millions of dogs eat and do well on Purina, it is the number one brand in the world after all. That is A LOT of dogs eating the brand. Just because your dog does not do well on a single Purina product that does not suddenly make the brand as a whole untrustworthy…

    in reply to: Grain Free #138865 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    All of the big brands have low fat foods. Royal Canin and Purina also make prescription foods specifically for pancreatitis too.

    in reply to: Grain Free #137783 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Well said Marie!! Pretty much everything I am thinking but written much better than if I had tried

    in reply to: Dog food #137727 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    These are the guidelines people are talking about https://www.wsava.org/WSAVA/media/Arpita-and-Emma-editorial/Selecting-the-Best-Food-for-your-Pet.pdf

    What exactly are you guys finding confusing about it? You don’t specify what is unclear. They are questions that any company in theory should be able to answer. WSAVA recommends you choose a food from a brand that can adequately answer those questions

    in reply to: Fromm dog food #137689 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Indeed! Drives me a little crazy when people say their food is pea free so it’s fine

    I live in Netherlands

    Does my English give me away that easily lol!

    in reply to: Fromm dog food #137686 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    It is not just an issue of grain free, the exact cause at this point in time has not even been identified. Some dogs have gotten DCM on grain inclusive foods too. That is why the recommendations right now really stress that the food should be trial tested too. Just being grain inclusive is not enough

    in reply to: About Mars pet foods #137685 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Mars is the parent company. As far as I know, Royal Canin has its very own manufacturing facilities and only RC is made in those facilities. So unless RC was also recalled for these issues I don’t see how it applies to that food. The people who manufacture Ceaser don’t make RC.

    I have heard from multiple vets who have visited the RC factories and they always describe them as spotless and very strict, comparable to a facility for human food. Due to all of the ingredient testing RC does prior and after using, I am personally very comfortable with RC but to each their own.

    in reply to: Dog food #137242 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Hi Joanne, I do not feed Purina as much as I feed Roycal Canin, but I do have excellent results with it! I dabbled in the “high end” grain free stuff for a while and cannot say I was ever pleased with it. Dry skin, huge loose stools, gas. I have nothing to complain about with RC or Purina (when I feed Purina it is typically Pro Plan). One of my dogs is dark and used to be coated in flakes back when she was on Orijen. Have not had that problem return since switching over a year ago.

    Both RC and PP are the most popular foods in my country, with just regular people and breeders and working dogs. They have a LONG history of good health and longevity. The way I see it, breeders and people who need their dogs for work would not continue to use these foods if they did not have generations of long living healthy dogs on these food. They would not continue to use them for years if their dogs were regularly dropping dead early from cancer and other diseases. The results of millions is what made me open my eyes, majority of people here feed these foods and their dogs are incredibly healthy.

    in reply to: Grain Free #137236 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Amazing what people will make up. Raw and home cooked feeders are deleted? BS. I am a member of that group and see people post about raw/homemade quite often. In fact, they have links in that group to help you find a nutritionist to formulate a raw or home cooked food for you. If you want to be blind to the information that is out there, fine. But what is the point of spreading lies?

    in reply to: Changing a puppy food to a new one #131986 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    I often stay with puppy food for my small ones. Mine tend to be VERY active as puppies and need quite a bit of calories for their body size. Small breeds need more calories per kg of weight than large dogs too. I have found it is easier to find higher calorie puppy food than adult food. Often if the food is not high enough in kcals, little dogs won’t eat enough because the portions are too large. Just depends on how your pup eats though and her calorie needs.

    If you want to switch her food I would wait at least a few more weeks. You should not change a puppies food right when you get them. Switching houses is stressful and switching the food they are used to can just add to the stress. Platinum, Ziwipeak, and Carnilove are the only ones on your list that I am really familiar with. All of which are decent foods. Best food is the one your dog is willing to eat though and has good stool, coat and energy on.

    in reply to: Humane dog food #131981 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    The only one that I am aware of that markets this is Open Farm

    in reply to: Changing a puppy food to a new one #131952 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    There is nothing wrong with Royal Canin. Everything has bad reviews online. I do not see why you would want to feed Acana anymore than RC. Acana is full of protein from peas/lentils/chickpeas/beans/etc. It also has quite a few cases of DCM linked to it, no for sure information yet but why take the risk with a food that has had that many incidences?

    Add ins like fruit and meat should be no more than 25% of a dog’s daily calories. If you really insist on switching foods maybe see if Farmina is available where you live? I live in Europe and it is a very popular food here and I think it is sold world wide. They will usually send out samples too if you ask, then you can see if your pup will eat it before committing to a bag.

    in reply to: puppy SURPRISE with balloons #131757 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Oh she sure is a cutie! I miss puppy fun. Enjoy it while it lasts, they get big much too fast lol

    in reply to: Senior Foods #131737 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    No problem! Yes adding those separately is a great idea. It really is quite overwhelming as there are hundreds of brands out there, some offer senior foods, some do not. Currently, there are no requirements that a food has to meet in order to be labeled a senior food. You will see all senior formulas will say something along the lines of “formulated to meet all the nutritional levels established by the AAFCO for adult maintenance”. That is the exact same thing an adult food will say. It may say for All Life Stages in place of Maintenance which means it also meets the minimum requirements for puppies.

    There are established requirements for puppies and adults but not seniors so feel free to use an adult food or all life stages food. What I typically look for for my older dog is 25-30% protein, 10-16% fat, 3-6% fiber, phosphorus preferably no higher than 1.5%, sodium around 0.3% no higher than 0.4%. These are just some levels I find works for my older dog and the levels I have talked over with my vet. These protein, fat and fiber levels are just what works personally for my dog, yours may need higher or lower.

    The reason I do not like to see high phosphorus for an older dog is because it can be hard on the kidneys and it is not exactly rare for older dog’s kidney health to decline. I stick to foods that do not have too high of sodium to keep the heart healthy as heart health also often declines with age. My dog now has a murmur so I am careful about that.

    And I am rambling lol hopefully that little guideline will help you find something suitable for your dog that is reasonably priced. I find having an idea in mind on what to look for in a food can help narrow down all the options

    in reply to: Senior Foods #131734 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    I don’t know about sites as I do not follow what any ratings say, that is just not how I choose my dog food.

    Everyone has different budgets so it is hard for me to say what is affordable without knowing yours. An adult food could work for your dog though. Seniors don’t really have special dietary needs. Some less active ones could do with less fat and calories but there are also adult foods that are not high in those. Glucosamine and Chondroitin added to most senior foods is pretty useless. The amount the dog would have to eat just to get a reasonable amount is ridiculously high.

    That said, Victor Senior is IMO a pretty affordable food with a good nutrition analysis. Good level of protein for a senior, lower fat without being too low (not enough could cause skin problems), phosphorus and sodium levels are good, good amount of L-Carnitine, and calories are quite low.

    in reply to: High ALT (liver enzyme) -food allergy? #131713 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    I have no idea if that could be caused by a food allergy but I would think your vet would know more than me, or anyone here for that matter. That said, my vet does say high protein diets can elevate liver enzyme count so who knows. Different vets seem to have different answers for everything.

    If I needed a simple duck based food I would personally go with Farmina. Protein is also more moderate if that is what you are looking for. It couldn’t hurt to lower the protein a bit. Dogs do not need 35%+ protein. Not that higher protein is necessarily bad, but if you suspect it may be causing problems with your dog you can certainly cut it down https://www.farmina.com/us/dog-food/n&d-quinoa-functional-canine/443-skin-&-coat-duck.html

    They also have a duck based canned food

    I would not feed Zignature right now as they have had quite a few links to DCM in dogs. Seems like a risky food until more is found out. I do not like Instinct either as most of their formulas are quite high in ash, calcium and phosphorus. I am not familiar with the other brands listed.

    in reply to: dog recipes and supplements #131686 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Hi Ashlee, you should not attempt to create a homemade diet for your dog (especially a pregnant one) without first consulting your vet. If your vet is not educated enough on the topic, they can point you to one who specializes in nutrition. There is a lot more to homemade food than just cooking some meat rice and veggies together.

    In the meantime, I would get her on a good puppy food. Something with a decent level of fat, calories and protein. Foods like Farmina puppy, Annamaet Ultra, or Victor Nutra Pro to throw a few examples out there.

    in reply to: trying to make feeding schedule for puppy #131482 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Great! I think you have got a good idea on how to feed her then. Lucky pup, sounds like she will eat well 🙂

    in reply to: trying to make feeding schedule for puppy #131479 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Schedule is honestly usually just based on what is convenient for the person. I see nothing wrong with three times a day.

    I feed add ons with my dogs food daily and I started when they were pups (anything from raw meat, veggies, tinned sardines, boiled eggs). The only advice I have is to make sure no more than 25% of her daily calories come from added food, that is the guideline my vet set for me. Otherwise you have to make sure your add ons are also complete and balanced. I also would not try adding all kinds of foods at once. Add one thing for a few days and see how she takes to it. If you start adding all kinds of stuff at once and her stomach does not agree with something, you won’t know which food she is reacting to.

    We do not have that kibble brand here so I cannot comment on whether it is good or not as I am not familiar with it. For puppy food, I do like Farmina puppy, Annamaet puppy, and Victor puppy

    in reply to: Pomeranian snacks #131471 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    I don’t give hard chews like antlers because my dogs do not care or realize that they cannot be bitten into smaller pieces. They will try anyway which will lead to broken teeth. Softer chews like lamb trachea and dehydrated fish skins work well for my smaller dog.

    My dogs LOVE fruit for treats. Raspberries, strawberries and blueberries are some of their favorites. Baby carrots and broccoli are well liked too. If I do use store bought treats, I tend to stick to “training treats”. These are typically very small so also very low on calories. Dogs do not care how big their reward is so I use small treats in order to not feed a bunch of useless calories.

    in reply to: yoga and vegetables, diet #131459 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Not really sure what you are asking, but “vegetables” is not a complete diet for dogs. If you would like to add some veggies to your dog’s meals that is perfectly fine. I occasionally boil broccoli for about 5 minutes for my dogs and put it in the food processor with some other veggies, like chard for example. I add a scoop of that to their food sometimes because they like the taste, they are a healthy treat, and low calorie.

    Sanne
    Member

    Someone on a forum having not heard of Victor before doesn’t say much about the brand. It is also quite an old brand, around since 1950 or so…

    Sanne
    Member

    Take a look at Victor Select dog food. Awesome stuff. Their Beef, Chicken, Lamb, and Ocean formulas are all 23-26% protein and grain inclusive. These are typically $40-$50 for 40 lb bags or around $25 for 15 lb, depends on store/location. Some of their Classic Multigrain formulas meet your needs too and are typically even a bit cheaper

    in reply to: Diet for renal failure #131123 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Why is it an issue though? If the vet diagnosed your dog with renal failure and says a prescription food is needed I would assume they would have no problem writing a prescription for it? You can then purchase from anywhere else that sells the food with that prescription.

    in reply to: Diet for renal failure #131120 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    I agree, if there is a health problem your dog has that requires specific nutrients I would stick with a prescription food. I really like Farmina’s prescription foods and Royal Canin is another good option. Since I am not a vet, I would not feel comfortable recommending a random food for a dog that I assume has some kind of ailment.

    in reply to: Feeding Guidelines w/ Added Toppers #130962 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Absolutely not bad to try it at all! Don’t beat yourself up over it, some dogs are just soo much more sensitive than others and there isn’t much we can do about it. Honestly, the ingredients do not look awful in that food at all. It may be a little low in meat but dogs do not NEED high amounts of meat to be healthy. I would have no problem trying this food if my dog was miserable on everything else. If it works, it will be oh so worth it to see your dog have relief. Trust me, if it works any guilt you have about feeding it will be gone. The “best food in the world” is garbage at the end of the day if your dog’s system is not happy on it.

    A few years back, I tried to feed my dogs some 40% protein 20% fat grain free type foods. I was dead set on feeding my dog these kinds of foods because they are supposedly so high in meat which is supposedly the only way to feed a dog. So much wasted time with my dog being miserable, gassy, huge loose stools, itching. I finally said F it and started from scratch. Dumped the high protein food, stuck with something between 25-30% protein 11-16% fat and rice, millet, or barely for the starch since this is kind of similar to what she was on as a pup. What a difference. Such small firm stools that took a maximum of 20 seconds to pass. No nasty residue left behind. It may not have the highest meat content but who cares?? My dog is like a normal dog, no poop or skin issues, no stressing about what might happen next on this food lol. As an example of what I like to see in a food, while I was in the States I fed my dog Victor Senior and that worked so perfectly for her. The brands I feed now here in Europe all have very similar ingredients/analysis.

    Geez I let this get very long, sorry sometimes I ramble on 🙂 I just wanted to let you know I know where you are coming from and do not let the guilt get to you over the brand/ingredients. Both you and your dog will be happier for it

    in reply to: Feeding Guidelines w/ Added Toppers #130954 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Oh that is a shame! Poor thing, I hate when my dogs get digestive upset. They look so miserable. If you still want to try adding your own topper, I wouldn’t bother with “recipes”. Especially for more sensitive dogs, I think it is better to add things one at a time instead of introducing mixes. I would just give plain chicken or beef added to their food for example. Then if they can eat that consistently for a week or so you can try adding something else.

    I’m sure you know this already but just in case.. also make sure your meat has no added sodium, and the leaner the better for sensitive dogs.

    in reply to: Feeding Guidelines w/ Added Toppers #130909 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Regardless of what I am feeding I know about how many calories both my dogs need to maintain their weight so that is how much I feed in a day. I mix raw meat, sardines, veggies, eggs etc in their food every day and simply make sure that the added food + dry food = their needed calories. I keep calories from added food to a max of 25% of their daily calories as that is what my vet suggested I stay around.

    I always recommend people know how many calories their dog eats from their normal food. Makes it so much easier to know how much dry to reduce if adding canned for example.

    in reply to: Help! Puppy food #130826 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Just my personal opinions of these brands.. I would not bother with Blue Buffalo. So many people seem to have digestive issues on that brand. I also do not like the company as a whole, seems shady. Orijen and Acana are imo very overpriced for what they are. So much beans/lentils/peas which in my experience are not very easy to digest. My dogs get gas and huge loose stools on foods that use beans/lentils as the starch source. I have had much better digestion results with foods that use rice/barely/potato/sweet potato, that is just my personal experience though. With all the odd cases of DCM/low taurine with dogs on Acana, I would hold off on that food anyway until more is found on that.

    I am not too familiar with Innova or Solid Gold. Wellness seems pretty decent. My go to puppy formulas are Farmina Puppy and Annamaet Original Puppy or Ultra. It really is trial and error though, what works for mine may not work for yours. You will only know what works for him by experience.

    As for mixing add ins, my dogs starting since they were pups get raw meat, boiled eggs, and tinned sardines added to their dry food. They are very used to this though as like I said this started very early on. I would not add in a bunch of stuff too quickly with your pup though. You could start with just some egg or chicken added in a few times a week and go from there.

    in reply to: Wet food vs Dry Kibble #130543 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Regardless of dry or tinned, you should go by calories. However many calories your dog maintains on with a dry food is going to be around what they need from a tinned food. There is no difference or benefit nutrition wise to dry food. So long as the tinned food you are feeding is labeled as “complete and balanced” you could feed all tinned if you like. The added moisture actually makes it a bit better than dry IMO

    I imagine most large dog owners feed primarily dry food unless they have the proper funds for it, which is of course possible for some.

    I personally feed my bigger dog 3/4 dry food and 1/4 “human food” like sardines, eggs, meat

    in reply to: Grain-free diets linked to heart disease? #130314 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    All of Farmina’s foods are free of those ingredients. Good food made with at least 90% animal protein. Annamaet grain inclusive foods do not have any of those ingredients either. I also like Purina Beyond grain inclusive foods, which are also free of all those ingredients.

    in reply to: Starch free and grain free dog food. #130115 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    If the vegetables are raw then it is still 100% raw. It may not be 100% meat but it is still raw…

    in reply to: Happy Birthday to Boone! #130036 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Happy birthday, he looks like quite a handsome dog!

    in reply to: weight management non grain free? #130034 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    I use Farmina Light for my older dog who needs less calories. Fat is around 11% I think. My dog does great on it

    Victor Select has a Senior/Weight Management food that also looks really good. Fat is around 12%

    Those are the only two I’m familiar with enough to recommend

    in reply to: Looking for Advice #130010 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Hi Alice, yes CBD oil is just as beneficial for humans! You could certainly ask your doctor about it and they may be able to point you in the right direction and tell you what to look for in a brand. I wish I could help you out on where to buy it but I live in the Netherlands so we have different brands.

    One of the best brands I have heard about available for dogs in the States is Super Snouts Hemp Company. They originally started with products for dogs but now have some for humans too. Quite pricey though I think! The people I know who have used this brand for their dogs say they usually only need half the recommended dose though. Still, seems much more expensive for humans. Even so, their website is a great resource for information on what makes a good quality CBD product and how it works, even if you go with a different brand

    in reply to: Looking for Advice #129933 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    I think most people go overboard with too many unnecessary supplements. If your dog is on a complete and balanced food there is no need for supplements unless you want something for a specific problem.

    Extra Omega 3’s are great for skin, joint, and heart health. It is a good overall supplement but I prefer to just feed my dog real mackerel or sardines as opposed to a fish oil supplement. It is cheaper and fresh food is always a good thing.

    Glucosamine, chondroitin, msm, green lipped mussel powder are all great for arthritis. CBD oil I find is even better

    Coq10 can be great for heart health if your dog has any problems with that

    As you can see, most supplements are good for specific issues and do not need to be given just because.

    in reply to: Mature/All Ages/Large Breed #129920 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    Lots of great advice in Susan’s post. Though if your dog has arthritis I would not rely on any food for glucosamine support. They are just not high enough to make any substantial difference. For example, in the Core Large Breed formula, the amount of food my bigger dog would eat of that brand would supply her around 300mg of glucosamine. Her vet recommends closer to 1000mg for her size. My dog would have to eat over a kg of that food just to meet her recommended amount daily lol. Best to use a supplement to add it if your dog needs it.

    On a side note, only thing I found to help my older dog’s aches and pains is CBD oil. Good stuff.

    in reply to: dog food questions #129809 Report Abuse
    Sanne
    Member

    I fed those Freshpet logs while on a trip. I wanted something easy on the stomach since my dogs were getting quite a sudden switch. I picked one of the chicken and brown rice rolls. My dogs LOVED that stuff and poeps were small and firm. Never any digestive upset and one of mine tends to be very sensitive.

    I really like the idea behind it, a fresh less processed food and price was not ridiculous for what you get. The ingredients were nice and simple too – meat, some organ, egg, rice and veggies. That was what drew me to it, I like simple for my dogs. I honestly can’t think of anything that would steer me away from it if it were available here.

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 61 total)