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Joseph G

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  • in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #141931 Report Abuse
    Joseph G
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    Dogs are not carnivores. It is a myth that dogs have similar dietary needs as wolves. Down to the genetic level, dogs are omnivores. For example, dogs have 30-times the starch digesting capability of wolves (the gene for the analysis enzyme is activated in dogs much more than in wolves).

    Dogs do not require carbs like humans do so it’s reasonable to feed them a diet with a fair amount of meat, but there’s no scientifically sound reason to avoid starches or vegetables.

    Methionine, the building block for taurine, is rich in some grains and poor in pulses, but no food tested had unusually low levels of methionine.

    Behaviorally as well, dogs are very different from wolves. This is why kooks like Cesar Milan are frowned upon by the dog training profession.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by Joseph G.
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by Joseph G.
    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #141505 Report Abuse
    Joseph G
    Member

    The FDA has released an update, detailing for the first time the brands with the most problems associated with them. The brands with at least 10 reported cases follow, but many other smaller brands are named in the full report:
    1. Acana
    2. Zignature
    3. Taste of the Wild
    4. 4 Health
    5. Earthborn Holistic
    6. Blue Buffalo
    7. Nature’s Domain
    8. Fromm
    9. Merrick
    10. California Natural
    11. Natural Balance
    12. Orijen
    13. Nature’s Variety
    14. NatruSource
    15. Nutro
    16. Rachel Ray Nutrish

    91% of cases involved Grain-Free foods. 93% used pulses in their formulation. Most were dry food. More cases were observed in males than females. Animal protein source was from many different sources.

    Golden retrievers tens to be prone to taurine deficiency and were the breed most affected, but amino acid profiles in the food were all normal. No other nutrient abnormalities have been found so far.

    More information is here, but the cause is still unknown: https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/news-events/fda-investigation-potential-link-between-certain-diets-and-canine-dilated-cardiomyopathy

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by Joseph G.
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by Joseph G.
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by Joseph G.
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