Dog Food Advisor Forums Jerry R

Jerry R

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Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • in reply to: European Dog Foods Available in USA/North America #150993 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    Spoiled, contaminated, or outdated dog food from the states isn’t bad enough? Now you want your dog’s food to sit in shipping docks waiting to clear customs in less than ideal conditions for God knows how long then shipped in shipping containers?
    Glad I’m not your dog!

    in reply to: Freshly killed food #150717 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    The cause of the most common of tapeworms is eating an infested flea.

    in reply to: has anyone fed Farmina N&D? thoughts? #150693 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    Well no wonder some of you are jumping from one dog food to the next because of issues. Pototoes? Seriously? If raw potatoes are toxic to dogs why would you feed kibble that has potatoes in any form?
    And seriously hay? Sorry I find that unbelievable. Grains and cereals are the main cause of food allergies in dogs. I wonder how many of their ancestors were out grazing in a hay field?

    As far as labels go, I wouldnt trust a dang thing any of them said anyway. As a truck driver, I’ve been in enough dog food plants to know I wouldnt feed that garbage to my dogs. Dead animals rotting away that stink to high heaven are ground up and put in dog food.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by Jerry R.
    in reply to: has anyone fed Farmina N&D? thoughts? #150686 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    You feed your dog hay?

    in reply to: Non-Grain Free, Chicken and Beef Free Food #150680 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    Carbohydrates, in particular grains, are not a natural part of the dog’s diet. Dogs do not have the ability to digest grains properly, so instead, an extra strain is put on the liver as it has to produce more bile to break down the insoluble fibre.

    Russell Swift, D.V.M. feels that grains suppress the immune system. Grains are mucous forming and provide an ideal environment for parasites to thrive in. Grains also contribute to the formation of dental plaque and tartar on the teeth, as well as bad breath and flatulence. Dr. Swift details how cats and dogs have no dietary requirements for carbohydrates nor are they equipped with the teeth to process them.

    in reply to: Non-Grain Free, Chicken and Beef Free Food #150679 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    Carbs have no place in a dog’s diet in any amount.

    in reply to: Starting Raw #150640 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    You continue to post links from vets. Vets are not educated in pet nutrition! If they were they wouldn’t recommend science diet for gawd sakes! That stuff is crap! Read the label!

    in reply to: Eating Raw Meaty Bones #150635 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    NEVER COOKED BONES! Raw only. Almost any poultry bones are soft enough for any dog to chew up and digest. I avoid turkey drumsticks as they are considerably harder for my little guy. I do let him chew the raw meast off them but the bones seem to be too hard. Turkey wings he puts away no problem.
    Chicken feet on the other hand he chews on and swallows whole once he has them crunched up. He just put away 2 of them in less than 30 minutes. Those are his treats.
    Excellent source of glucosamine and chondroitin. Glucosamine is a drug your vet will prescribe for arthritis btw. Avoid the need for such intervention by feeding it to your dog BEFORE he suffers such a painful condition.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by Jerry R.
    in reply to: Eating Raw Meaty Bones #150527 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    This is age old argument that will survive the test of time for many years to come. If feedings dogs what they are meant to eat and love to was as bad as makers of kibble and people like anonymous that promote and advertise for suggest, no one would be feeding it to their best friends.
    Truth is, people that have seen first hand how healthy their dogs are seldom go to back to feeding that garbage to their pets.
    Read the labels!

    in reply to: Rescue dog won't eat kibble, need help #150461 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    Disregard the unfounded nonsense about raw. My pup wouldn’t eat kibble either. After months of trying every good dog food under the sun, I finally realized he’s smarter than I thought. He knows that crap kibble is bad and being the spoiled, stubborn dachshund that he is, he knew I’d get it sooner or later.
    Now he’s a happy, healthy 18 month old that eats raw meat, meaty bones, and organs. Everything he needs and none of the crap he doesn’t that kibble is full of.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by Jerry R.
    in reply to: Starting Raw #150459 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    The vast majority of vets have little to no experience in pet nutrition. The little they do have is what kibble companies that pay for their education tell them. This is no BS either.
    Science diet is a major contributor to their education which clearly explains how such a poor dog food can be #1 vet recomended.
    Don’t let people like anonymous contribute to these myths about raw feeding and meaty bones.
    Vets are counting on exactly that because feeding raw significantly cuts into their livlihood in greatly reduced vet visits for health issues from allergies to arthritis.
    My 18 month old red longhaired dachshund recently got an A++ clean bill of health from his dr. after a brief exam while getting his rabies booster giving mention to his very healthy skin and coat and unusually clean, white chompers not normally seen in his breed.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by Jerry R.
    in reply to: Eating Raw Meaty Bones #150458 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    That explains it…educated in vet medicine.
    They could get hit by a car too. You’re barking up the wrong tree. No pun intended.

    One of many vets that say otherwise. Including mine.

    http://www.thrivingcanine.com/vet_opinion_raw_meaty_bones

    in reply to: Galliprant for Osteoarthritis anyone? #150345 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    Prevention is the best medicine. This why my dachshund gets plenty of chicken feet and turkey and chicken wings. Necks too.
    Very high in glucosamine which is excellent for joint health and prevention of arthritis.
    I’m obviously concerned about IVDD.
    I realize it doesn’t stop it from becoming an issue all the time but I do what I can to give him the best chance of avoiding such issues.

    in reply to: Eating Raw Meaty Bones #150344 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    I wonder what all the wolves do when they need an ER from eating bones? Must be a lot of dead ones out there from this dangerous practice.
    Mine chews them thoroughly and is always supervised.
    Did you know more dogs choke on dry kibble than they do bones?

    in reply to: Eating Raw Meaty Bones #150338 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    My 18lb dachshund has no problems with working the marrow out af far as he can in the bigger beef bones.
    Loves the turkey wings too. I break them into 3 pieces. He likes the very end best and that 4-5″ wing tip is gone in 20 minutes.
    He’s a hunter by nature so he’s right at home eating these bones, cartilage, and all.
    One of these days he’s going to catch one of these squirrels and have a real treat. If he wasn’t fenced in he would have already.

    in reply to: Can Dog eat Raw Carrot? #150334 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    Oh and as far as vitamins…he gets all he needs from lamb liver and other organ meat, turkey and chicken gizzards and hearts. I quit trying feed him veggies. He doesn’t care for them and he doesn’t need them. Most veggies and fruit goes right thru anyway.

    in reply to: Can Dog eat Raw Carrot? #150333 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    I agree with spy car. My dachshund gets chicken feet or pork tails for a treat. He works at the chicken feet crunching it up for 30 minutes or so then swallows it. Far more nutritional value and cleans his teeth.
    He turns his nose up and walks away from a carrot giving me the look. That’s not meat.

    in reply to: New to raw feeding #150169 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    I switched to raw for my 16 month old red longhaired dachshund after much research and him not liking any kibble I bought for him. Maybe he’s smarter than I think. He is spoiled. I feed him from the grocery store and meat market. He loves chicken and a drumstick/thigh is more than a meal for him.
    He works at it for an hour(skin, bones, and all).
    He gets chicken feet to chew on for a treat. He’ll crunch it up for 30-45 minuted and swallow it.
    He gets turkey wings too. One of them is 3 meals for him!
    Pig tails, chicken and turkey gizzards and hearts, a little lamb liver I bought 10lbs. of for $8 .
    Beef and lamb when reduced for quick sale is a great way to offer variety.
    He’s as healthy as can be. And those chicken feet are very high in glucosamine for joint health. Great for reducing the effects of and preventing arthritis. Cleans their teeth too.
    I try to follow these basic rules but I not naive enough to believe that every meal needs to be properly balanced.
    60% lean muscle meat
    20 % organ meat(5% liver)
    20% bones, cartilage
    He gets everything he needs and none of the crap he doesn’t. Firmer poop and far less of it and it doesn’t stink to high heaven. Clean teeth.
    I use common sense in ths hygiene dept. and don’t use rotten meat like I’m sure kibble has.

    in reply to: Supplement: Nutra Thrive #150095 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    I looked into this stuff when I went to a completely prey diet for my 16 month old dachshund til I realized it just wasn’t necessary and a waste of money.
    No substitute for a proper diet.
    Chicken and turkey feet and necks are high in glucosamine for dogs with arthritis, btw.

    in reply to: French Bulldog puppy food help – loose stool #150093 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    And draining grease isn’t necessary if you don’t cook it in the first place. You’re just removing too many nutrients just like the heat process of all kibbles do. Raw meat and bones including organs. I’ll never go back to commercial dog food of any kind. My dachshund has never been healthier and no more diarrhea.
    I’m glad I went prey after a problem of him not caring for any dog food I bought him. Maybe they know what’s best for them.

    in reply to: French Bulldog puppy food help – loose stool #150092 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    Corn has about as much nutritional value as a box of rocks! Dogs have no business eating such crap. Seriously. What are you thinking!

    in reply to: Suggested Raw Dog Food Menus? #150091 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    Ground egg shells from commercial eggs also contain pesticides.
    I’ve gone to pretty much all prey. I do occasionally mix fresh veggies but my dachshund doesn’t much care for them. Fruits seem to go right thru him if I can even get him to eat any so I much bother.
    Given the right amounts of organ meat they really aren’t critical anyway.
    Chicken feet are great for joint health and teeth cleaning. So are wings, necks.
    I’m still getting into the groove so to speak but for the most part, I trust his judgement too. If he turns his nose up and walks away…yeah he’s a spoiled brat!
    Grinding chicken and turkey bones is totally unnecessary. Except maybe turkey drumsticks. They’re too hard.
    My boy chews most poultry bones right up and he’s a 17lb. Dachshund.

    in reply to: New to raw feeding #150090 Report Abuse
    Jerry R
    Member

    Dogs can handle bacteria tho I do take common sense precautions. I take warninging like the one above with a grain of salt.
    And while my raw feeding started out as buying ground frozen Angus from a local raw food supplier that ships too, I quickly changed to meat from grocery store and meat market. Whole chickens, beef, lamb, turkey.
    Chicken feet and necks, turkey necks are great for joint health. I bought 10lbs of lamb liver for $7 from the local meat market and mix a little with other meat a couple times a week.
    Pork tails, chicken and turkey gizzards and hearts. All from the grocery store and cheap.

Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)