Dog Food Advisor Forums anonymously

anonymously

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 749 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: DinoVite #90137 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/herbs-and-supplements/ http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/nutrition/
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=probiotics
    Nothing being sold at the above sites, no supplements, no t-shirts, no membership fees, no books, nothing.

    in reply to: DinoVite #90136 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Why does the dog need supplements?

    I would take the dog to a vet, has he had a senior workup? Labs, exam etc. If not, that is where I would start. Get him diagnosed and then evaluate the treatment options presented.
    Supplements are not medication.

    in reply to: Best budget-friendly healthy food #90128 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Nothing is being sold at the below sites, no supplements, no books, no t-shirts, no member fees, nothing. Hope this helps.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/herbs-and-supplements/
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=probiotics
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/nutrition/

    Science -based veterinary medicine.

    in reply to: Best budget-friendly healthy food #90092 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Newman’s Own Organics Advanced Formula dry and Nutrisca dry. I have been mixing the 2 for my terrier with good results.
    Check the reviews at chewy.com

    PS: I use kibble as a base, 1/3 to 1/2 of the diet, I add a tasty topper such as: a bit of cooked chopped chicken breast, lean meat, scrambled egg…..I always add a little water to the meal, no free feeding. Two meals per day measured amounts, a bite of something for a midday snack as a reward after a walk.
    Also, check the reduced price section at your local market for boneless meat/chicken, I have been doing this for years with no adverse effects. Sometimes, you have to divide stuff up in 1-2 day serving size baggies and freeze.

    in reply to: epilepsy and how to prevent #90049 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    You’re welcome. How old is the dog? I find idiopathic seizures start when they are young adults (9 months-1year). Of course, a healthy diet, exercise, keeping weight within normal limits will help, but it won’t stop the seizures.
    If they are occurring more than once a month and or are severe, I would not hesitate to start medication. If you have any doubts, you could consult a veterinary neurologist, but usually the regular vet can treat this.
    It doesn’t change their personality if they are on anticonvulsants, not from what I have observed, anyway.
    PS: When the dog has been stable for a while, maybe a year, you can work with your vet to taper the dog off of meds for a trial period and see what happens…..

    in reply to: Suggested Raw Dog Food Menus? #90045 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member
    in reply to: epilepsy and how to prevent #90041 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    From one of my previous posts:

    Seizures in canines are often idiopathic (unknown cause) and genetic. It’s neurological. Like a brainstorm that will occur at certain intervals, of course sensitivities could trigger, things like thunderstorms can lower the seizure threshold.
    Probably best to avoid unnecessary additives and chemicals and make sure the dog is getting adequate exercise.
    If he has more than 1 seizure a month the vet will advise medication, this is necessary and will help him.
    Uncontrolled seizures can lead to brain damage, not to mention the suffering and confusion the dog experiences.
    I had a dog with seizures that lived to old age on a daily low dose of phenobarbital. Listen to your vet regarding diet recommendations, I didn’t avoid any particular foods. However, a simple ingredient food might make sense. I like Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea
    Also, ask your vet about a rabies vaccine waiver, he may qualify, if he is diagnosed with a neurological disorder.

    in reply to: epilepsy and how to prevent #90040 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Seizures are a neurological disorder. Food won’t help. Supplements won’t help. Medication prescribed by veterinarian that has examined and diagnosed the dog helps and may prevent the brain damage and suffering caused by untreated seizures.

    Check this blog for science-based veterinary medicine http://skeptvet.com/Blog/

    in reply to: Dinovite Reaction? #90028 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Several negative reports per the search engine here https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/dinovite/

    I hope your vet warned you about supplements, most do nothing and some can cause harm.
    If your dog has a skin condition I would go to a board-certified veterinary dermatologist, get her diagnosed and then you can evaluate the treatment options presented.
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    in reply to: serious concerns about blue buffalo #89901 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    First go to the vet. Seriously, he has been vomiting for 2 weeks and consistently for the last 3 days. At the least, he may be dehydrated. You have to rule out medical issues before assuming the food is causing problems.

    in reply to: Crystals in urne #89895 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Call your vet and leave a message for him to call you back when he has a minute regarding what vitamin C product he recommends for your dog, and clarify the dosage. Don’t forget, add water to meals.

    in reply to: Questions concerning raw #89888 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    One of your articles regarding “sled dogs” is from 1973, the other is from a book that cost $150 and I can’t find the name of one veterinarian that has anything to do with the book.

    “And there’s my vet, who explicitly told me there’s no need for dogs to eat carbs, it’s just nearly impossible to make dry kibble without them”.

    Exactly, that is why many of us use a quality kibble as a base, 1/3 to 1/2 of the diet and add healthy toppers. Maybe you should give your vet a call and ask him to clarify what he meant by that statement, see what he recommends…

    in reply to: Questions concerning raw #89885 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Where are you getting your information? From well meaning folks on the internet and Doctor Google?
    Consult a professional, some of your comments don’t make any sense. Only a veterinarian that has examined your dog and reviewed it’s history can make specific recommendations regarding diet. Just my opinion. It appears that you have already decided what you want to do and are just looking for posters to support your opinions.
    Best of luck.

    in reply to: Questions concerning raw #89883 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Regarding carbs, you made me think of the grapefruit diet made famous years ago during the era of a celebrity model named Twiggy. Anyway, a lot of humans ended up with kidney damage on diets that completely eliminated carbs…just saying.

    in reply to: Questions concerning raw #89878 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Maybe this link will help:
    http://www.homeovet.net/dynamic/php/downloads/dog-c8470f2c75dbe4b683205c3919ee2310/dog_diet_complete.pdf

    I am leery of homeopathic vets, however, this one seems to be legit. The article is a few years old, but I think it has some good guidelines.

    in reply to: Questions concerning raw #89875 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    “To whomever the anonymous person is: I see these Skeptvet articles linked in a lot of the raw threads”.

    I am someone who has tried raw diets for my pets, as I would speculate the others that are trying to alert you to the possible dangers probably are.
    I don’t enjoy going to the emergency veterinary clinics.

    PS: I am an RN and have owned dogs for a few decades.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 11 months ago by anonymously.
    in reply to: Questions concerning raw #89871 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    From a previous link provided: “The real “experts” in this area are board-certified veterinary nutritionists, individuals who have advanced residency training in nutrition and have passed the board certification exam of the American College of Veterinary Nutrition”.

    Maybe you should consider consulting a board-certified veterinary nutritionist.

    in reply to: Questions concerning raw #89864 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/choosing-the-right-diet-for-your-pet/ (excerpt below, click on link for full article)
    “Raw diets are another popular option on the market today. Studies have shown that 20-35% of raw poultry and 80% of raw food dog diets tested contained Salmonella. This poses a health risk for your pet, but also for humans. This is especially true for children or immunocompromised adults, whether exposed to the raw food directly, or the feces of the pet eating the raw food. Additionally, there is increased risk of other bacterial infections and parasitic diseases when feeding raw diets. And the bottom line is there is no reason to believe raw food is healthier than cooked food”.
    http://support.mspca.org/site/PageServer?pagename=latestnews_GenericPetFoodRecipes
    More information below:
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/

    in reply to: Want to switch to better quality food #89863 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Oops! Posted on wrong thread. Please delete.

    in reply to: SHEP Dog Food (Wet) #89853 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Before you blame the food, take your dog to the vet and rule out medical reasons for loose stools/diarrhea. If it goes on for more than 72 hours in a row.
    Annual checkups are essential, check for worms, heartworm/Lyme etc. Bring a feces sample.

    in reply to: Want to switch to better quality food #89821 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Did the vet that examined her say she was in good health? If so, I would stay with the same brand. What did the veterinarian recommend? You can leave him a message for him to call you when he has a minute and see what dog food he suggests.
    My small breeds like Nutrisca dry foods. Check Chewy.com for reviews. I have never tried Blue Wilderness. The Nutrisca is a small kibble so I find the little ones do well on it.
    Hope this helps:
    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/choosing-the-right-diet-for-your-pet/

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/ see blogs on nutrition

    in reply to: Want to switch to better quality food #89818 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    What are your questions? If she is doing well on her current food just go to the adult formula. Don’t free feed (leave food down all day) offer 2 meals a day, measured amounts, pick up and store anything not eaten in 10 minutes in the fridg and offer at the next meal time.
    Add a splash of water to meals, and brush the teeth once a day (see YouTube for how to videos) small breeds tend to have lousy teeth.
    I use kibble as a base and add a bite of something tasty to it, chopped up cooked lean meat, a spoonful of scrambled egg…you get the idea.

    Oh, btw, the same folks that answer in the Editors Choice Forum tend to answer questions here too.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 11 months ago by anonymously.
    in reply to: Is It the ingredients or the brand? #89815 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Because, different diets and foods agree with different dogs. There is no one perfect food for all dogs. Raw is not worth the risk, in my opinion.
    Be glad your friend has found a food that his dogs appear to be doing well on.
    Hope this helps:

    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/choosing-the-right-diet-for-your-pet/

    http://support.mspca.org/site/PageServer?pagename=latestnews_GenericPetFoodRecipes

    in reply to: Best dog food for yeast #89809 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    http://www.greerlabs.com/index.php/veterinary_allergy/veterinary_dermatologist/

    This is an example of a pharmacy that prepares “Allergenic Extract” the solution used for allergen specific immunotherapy per veterinary dermatologist’s orders.
    The veterinary dermatologist that performs the IDT (intradermal testing) determines the solution based on the results of testing, how often to be given, etc.
    That is why the expertise of the veterinarian is so crucial to successful results.

    “At GREER®, we are committed to providing quality products and services to veterinary dermatologists. You can be confident in the extensive line of GREER® Extracts™ − trusted by over 160 dermatology practices and 27 veterinary colleges in the United States. GREER offers products to support all aspects of your allergy practice”

    in reply to: Best dog food for yeast #89807 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    The product is a solution especially made for the dog by the lab/pharmacy that the veterinary dermatologist is affiliated with. It is prepared with various ingredients according to exactly what the dog is allergic to. It is different for each dog.

    List of dermatologists by area: http://www.acvd.org/tools/locator/locations.asp?distance=10&zip=&city=&state=CA&Submit=Submit

    See my post above (7/25 7:18am) for a detailed description of Intra Dermal Skin Testing,
    btw: It can be given sublingually now versus sub q (injections).

    The initial testing is expensive but the maintenance is not so bad. We only go to the dermatologist once a year. Only go to the regular vet for annual heartworm testing.
    Also, talk to your vet about it, but I avoid vaccines for allergy dogs.

    in reply to: Best dog food for yeast #89804 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    I noticed improvement right away, after the first month with gradual improvements, at 1 year to 1 1/2 year she was completely stable. Occasional flare-ups (mild) certain times of the year.
    I never did any blood tests as related to diagnosing her allergies. The dermatologist said we could skip, as her allergies appeared to be environmental. Just did the intradermal skin testing.

    Each dogs allergens are unique, there is no blanket treatment. Not all allergies are seasonal, there are thousands of airborne allergens present year round , no matter what area you live in. The household dust mite, and dander (shedding off the skin of all living things) microscopic and impossible to avoid. I tried for 1 year with poor results, even had an air purifier and de-humidifier going. They both went to the Goodwill.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2010/06/evidence-based-canine-allergy-treatment/
    Respit is discussed in comments starting on 6/14/10 of the above blog.

    in reply to: Best dog food for yeast #89774 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    It is a medicine prescribed for dogs that are suffering with environmental allergies.
    http://www.2ndchance.info/Apoquel.htm
    “Apoquel, a Zoetis product, is a medication designed to interrupt the inflammatory process that occurs in the skin of most dogs with allergies (blocks or inhibits the pro-inflammatory cascade)”.

    I declined it for my dog and chose instead to go to a Board Certified Veterinary Dermatologist, had IDT (intradermal testing) identified the allergens within an hour of the first appointment and started Allergen Specific Immunotherapy, with positive results for over 4 years now.
    There is no cure for allergies, it is a lifelong treatment, with stable periods and occasional flareups. Fortunately there are effective treatments available. Allergen Specific Immunotherapy is the most natural way to treat environmental allergies, it is not a medication…..

    However, until the dogs condition is stable the veterinarian will prescribe a variety of medications to stop the suffering until the ASIT kicks in (if the dog is started on this) or certain times of the year to control seasonal allergies. And during occasional flare-ups meds may be needed. The meds are helpful and often necessary short-term. I have heard of side effects when they are used long-term. It would be best to discuss these issues with the veterinarian that is treating the dog.

    in reply to: My Homemade dog food recipe #89760 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=raw+diet

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/

    Hope this helps:

    By Klaus Loft, DVM
    Angell Dermatology Service

    Anyone who suffers debilitating environmental allergies tied to changing seasons, pet dander or household dust mites knows first-hand the misery of a scratchy throat, itchy eyes or painful rashes.

    Not everyone knows, however, that our pets can experience similar allergic reactions — and other very bothersome dermatological issues. But our pets need not suffer in silence. Modern veterinary science has evolved such that advanced, comprehensive treatments are now available to treat a range of skin conditions.

    Top pet dermatological issues

    Our four-legged friends suffer from some of the same skin issues as we do — and several that we do not. The most common conditions we see at Angell include:

    •Parasites, such as mites, fleas and mange (scabies)
    •Infectious diseases, such as Staphylococcal pyoderma (“Staph”) skin infections, yeast and fungal infections and skin fold infections
    •Systemic diseases, such as autoimmune diseases
    •Skin cancer, such as Squamous cell carcinoma, cutaneous lymphoma, Mast cell tumors
    •Allergies, such as flea allergy dermatitis, adverse food reactions, environmental allergies, etc.

    All of these conditions can become serious and, if untreated, dramatically reduce quality of life. But the tremendous strides made in veterinary innovation, however, is very good news for our pets. Specifically, the testing and treatments for allergies now rivals human healthcare in its sophistication, quality of care and long-term health outcomes.

    Unlike humans, dogs and cats cannot tell us about their dermatological health issues. So we as pet owners must look for the signs. The most common indicators that a pet is suffering from some kind of allergy involve frequent episodes of ear infections, red raised or open sores on the skin, constant licking or biting of paws or groin — sometimes causing wounds that will not go away.

    Allergies present a particular challenge because there can be hundreds (even thousands) of potential allergens that impact pet health, from foods to pollen from grasses, weeds, trees, dust mites and more. Today’s specialty veterinary hospitals have access to the very latest diagnostic tests to get to the bottom of what’s ailing our pet. Among these tests is the Intra Dermal Test (IDT).

    IDT is generally considered the gold standard of testing for identifying allergens that cause pets to suffer from chronic skin and/or ear diseases. IDT involves injections of a series of concentrated allergens into the skin to determine which of them generate allergic reactions in a given animal. The use of fluorescein — a chemical that illuminates the inflammation caused by the injected allergens in order to visualize the strength of individual reactions — is key to accurately diagnosing pet allergies, and is just one of the many ways veterinarians use new technologies to improve care and diagnostics.

    The results of IDT (as well as a review of the pet’s medical history) can then inform comprehensive immunotherapy treatments to relieve suffering. Veterinary dermatologists rely on IDT to build customized treatment plans for patients called Allergen Specific Immuno Therapy or “ASIT” for short.

    ASIT involves a series of injections specifically created for the allergic animal’s skin. These injections, of diluted allergens, are designed to make a pet less sensitive to their allergens over time. In most cases these injections must be continued for life to reduce symptoms, but they are highly effective. Seventy to 90 percent of pets experience a reduction in symptoms as a result of ASIT treatment. These treatments can be delivered even more easily via droplets under the tongue, perfect for pet owners who are squeamish about giving injections to their pet.

    This treatment is very new to the North American field of medicine (both human and veterinary) and underscores just how far innovation in veterinary medicine has come.

    When it’s time to see the vet

    Many pet owners are understandably concerned about taking their animals to the veterinarian because the cost (to say nothing of the fear some animals experience when going do the doctor) may outweigh any perceived reduction in suffering. To help pet owners know when it’s time to bring Fido to the doctor I’ve compiled my “Top Ten” list of dermatological symptoms that should never be ignored:

    •Intense itching of the skin (head shaking, running the face into the carpet, furniture, etc.)
    •Biting at the skin that creates red, raw crusting areas of the skin
    •Multiple ear infections (head shaking, odor from ears, scratching at the ears with hind legs)
    •Paw licking or chewing and frequent infections of the skin in the webbed skin of the paws
    •Staining of the fur of the paws and nails on multiple feet
    •Reoccurring skin infections in the groin, under the shoulders, perianal areas (on or under the tail)
    •Greasy scaling skin and/or fur with odorous skin
    •Hair loss, or thinning of the fur
    •Dark pigmentation of the skin that is chronically infected
    •Sudden depigmentation of skin

    Allergies and other dermatological issues can be as frustrating for pet owners and their veterinarians as they can be for pets. I encourage any pet owner whose animal is experiencing any of these symptoms to consult with their veterinarian.

    in reply to: My Homemade dog food recipe #89757 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    I strongly recommend making an appointment with a Board Certified Veterinary Dermatologist, The food may have nothing to do with his allergies. It is impossible to avoid all allergens, for example: The common household dust mite is everywhere all year round on the skin and dander of all living things and constantly being shed, lots of airborne allergens too. See my posts via the search engine: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    “If the symptoms have been going on for more than 1 year/4 seasons and have not responded in a significant way to treatment by a veterinarian. Consider making an appointment with a dermatologist”.

    “This subject comes at least once a week. People are reluctant to go to a specialist because they are concerned about the cost, and yet they end up spending much more going back and forth to the regular vet and trying all kinds of gobbledygook remedies”.

    Environmental allergies.
    excerpt below from: http://www.2ndchance.info/Apoquel.htm
    “Food Allergies are probably over-diagnosed in dogs (they account for, perhaps 5-10%). Hypoallergenic diets are occasionally, but not frequently, helpful in canine atopy cases but you should always give them a try. Food intolerances are more common – but considerably more likely to result in digestive disturbances and diarrhea than in itching problems”.

    Mail-in hair and saliva tests do not test for allergies and tend to be inaccurate. Food sensitivities fluctuate. Food allergies are rare.

    Also:http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies

    in reply to: Crystals in urne #89688 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Did you check the search engine here? https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/bladder+stones/

    Excerpts from previous posts:

    As your vet will confirm, dogs that have a tendency to make bladder stones have to be on a special diet the rest of their lives, this is a serious condition and it just doesn’t go away.

    I would comply with the prescription food for now.
    And don’t forget, water, water, and more water added to the diet. Ask the vet ….but I believe this helps big time. And frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate.

    “My dog had both (struvite and calcium oxalate), no symptoms till the age of 11, started with UTIs. He has had no recurrences in 4 years since his emergency surgery.

    “There is a genetic component and some breeds are more prone to bladder stones”.

    “Anyway, if you do nothing else, add water and take her out to urinate frequently”.

    PS: Soak the kibble, even the prescription food in water overnight in the fridg, add more water prior to serving. Keep the bladder flushed. Maybe add a little canned prescription food as a topper.

    Don’t add supplements unless recommended by a veterinarian that has examined the dog.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry

    PS: Start brushing the teeth once a day, see YouTube for how to videos, small breeds tend to have lousy teeth.

    in reply to: Soft diet for diabetic dogs #89666 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    See what your vet recommends, ask if Nutrisca would be a good option?
    “Nutrisca is one of the only grain free recipes without potato or tapioca, which are high on the glycemic index and contribute to weight gain. Instead, low glycemic chickpeas and peas are included as excellent sources of protein, fiber and folic acid”.
    https://www.chewy.com/nutrisca-grain-free-turkey-chickpea/dp/36099

    in reply to: Swallowing/Gulping — Seizure? #89665 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    “Thank you for posting so that I can see a neurologist and have knowledge”.
    @ Susie:
    I would start with a regular veterinarian, find one close to home, ask dog owners in your community who they go to/recommend.
    She needs a senior workup, labs and exam to begin with.
    What you describe sounds neurological, it is not recommended to give a dog with a neurological condition any vaccine, so just decline and remind them she is a senior and she is not medically stable if they bring it up.

    Do not give over the counter meds or supplements to your pet unless recommended by a veterinarian that has examined her. You have no idea what you are treating and could make the situation worse. Especially with medications that are intended for humans.
    First thing is to get her diagnosed by a veterinarian and then evaluate the treatment options that are presented. I wouldn’t make any diet changes right now either.

    anonymously
    Member

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies
    Science Based Veterinary Medicine

    Hope this helps

    PS: Nothing is being sold at that site, no supplements, no books, nothing.

    anonymously
    Member

    I have a dog with allergies, I tried everything, diet changes, listening to homeopathic vets, gobbledygook remedies. Going back and forth to the regular vet.
    After a year of this foolishness, I went to a veterinary dermatologist, I spent a few bucks for testing, but within an hour of the evaluation I received a diagnosis and a treatment plan for my dog. She responded to the recommended therapy.
    She has been stable ever since (5 years). Allergies don’t go away, they wax and wane. This makes it very difficult, if not impossible, to determine what is working and what is not.

    Sometimes it is true, you get what you pay for.

    anonymously
    Member

    Sounds good. Thanks for the update.

    in reply to: Our hearts are filled with sadness #89545 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Thank you, Marie
    I know we don’t always agree, but I know we love animals and are passionate about taking care of them.
    Actually, he was suffering from dementia, more so the past few months. When you have a pack, more than one dog, it is important to keep an eye on them. The dogs with cognitive disorders give off inappropriate body language. My young terrier started to attack him, this is not unusual, it is instinctive.
    I did all I could to keep him comfortable….
    I found a helpful site regarding canine dementia: http://dogdementia.com/blog/

    in reply to: Our hearts are filled with sadness #89541 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Sorry, I had to say goodbye to my red peke recently (age16)
    It never gets easy.

    I so hope that they go to a better place and that we get too see them again. I hope that dogs that have passed before them are there to greet them on the other side.
    I am not religious, but it is times like this that I hope that I am wrong.

    in reply to: My Homemade dog food recipe #89536 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    The recipes were formulated by Rebecca L. Remillard, Ph.D., D.V.M., DACVN Veterinary Nutritionist.
    I think they are good and it was quite generous of her to share them.

    “It is recommended that you consult a Certified Veterinary Nutritionist concerning your pet’s diet if they have any pre-existing medical conditions or might require special dietary needs”

    Regarding: http://support.mspca.org/site/PageServer?pagename=latestnews_GenericPetFoodRecipes

    @ Diane B, the poster whose dog was treated for oxalate stones, I would go by the prescription food that your veterinarian recommends, and add water, frequent bathroom breaks.
    Some of the foods you mentioned were prohibited for my dog that had a history of bladder stones. Most veggies are high in oxalates.

    in reply to: My Homemade dog food recipe #89526 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member
    in reply to: Extreme allergies #89489 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    My dog with environmental allergies (receives Allergen Specific Immunotherapy) does well on Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea as a base. See Chewy.com for reviews.

    PS: She can’t tolerate Orijen, my terrier likes it, however with the changes coming up and the price increase he may go back to Nutrisca, he does well on that also, including the Chicken dry.

    in reply to: Yeast/Allergy food help? #89477 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Have you tried the search engine here? Example: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    If your vet has not been helpful, consider seeing a specialist. A board certified veterinary dermatologist, he will decide what testing is indicated to properly diagnose your dog.
    Her allergies may be environmental and have nothing to do with the food.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 11 months ago by anonymously.
    anonymously
    Member

    “Swimming is not only fun for your dog…but it also does great things for him. The resistance of water makes your dog work harder to swim than he has to work on land to walk or run. He will show improved muscular strength and tone, while working the cardio-vascular and respiratory systems, without the impact of concussive exercise on land and the associated damage that it may cause”.

    “It may surprise you to know that for a dog, 1 minutes’ swimming is equivalent to about 4 minutes of running, according to Dr Arleigh Reynolds, a Veterinary Surgeon and Canine Physiologist”. (excerpt from:) http://vividlife.me/ultimate/1142/the-benefits-of-swimming-for-your-dog/

    I took my own advice and took my terrier to the local lake today (No Dogs Allowed)
    No one is around early in the morning, anyway he did quite well, jumped right in to retrieve his favorite ball and started swimming to get to it. Eventually we lost the ball. We were only there 15 minutes and he seemed energized, so we will try that again. He is showing some signs of mild arthritis and I want to do what ever I can to prevent it from becoming chronic. I will also ask my vet about aqua therapy (swimming in a pool) not sure I can afford it…but will check it out.

    in reply to: need help! parvo survivor puppy with giardia #89459 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Try not to get discouraged, he is just a puppy, sometimes they stabilize and outgrow these things. My pet shop dog would have episodes of diarrhea, at least twice a week. This went on till she was 9 months old and then it just suddenly stopped!
    I never even got it diagnosed and my other dogs didn’t get it……she remained healthy for many years, but then the big C took her.

    Anyway, maybe get another vet’s opinion as SkeptVet suggested.

    in reply to: advice re: Omega 3 or other type #89442 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Is he drinking enough water? Maybe add a little to his kibble.
    He sounds like my Corgi, she shed constantly, but was easy to groom otherwise.

    PS: About once a week give him a grooming outside, I used a thing called a shedding blade.
    Anyway, a ton of hair would come out. I occasionally caught the birds carrying the fur away for nesting material. So, it went to good use.

    Example:https://www.chewy.com/conairpro-dog-shedding-blade-large/dp/43160

    in reply to: advice re: Omega 3 or other type #89440 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Malaseb shampoo is gentle, my dog with allergies is bathed once or twice a week with it (per instructions from her dermatologist).
    Check Chewy.com

    What breed is Charlie? Some breeds just naturally shed a lot…

    PS: A fish oil capsule per day may help, I just use the human kind from the local drugstore.

    in reply to: advice re: Omega 3 or other type #89438 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Your dog may have environmental allergies, that will cost a few bucks to get under control, it just doesn’t go away. Perhaps that was why the dog was given up. See what a veterinarian that has examined the dog recommends.

    in reply to: advice re: Omega 3 or other type #89436 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Supplements are not medication, they are not FDA approved. They are food supplements, not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure….read the fine print.
    Perhaps you will find some helpful information here:
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/herbs-and-supplements/

    PS: Consult with a local vet, tell him your financial concerns, he will advise you accordingly.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 11 months ago by anonymously.
    in reply to: need help! parvo survivor puppy with giardia #89430 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member
    in reply to: need help! parvo survivor puppy with giardia #89429 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    Great. If you are new to the site it may take a few hours for the comment to show up, once they know you, you get right through.

    What blog did you respond to?

    PS: Depending on how busy he is, it could take a day or two. Sometimes, for whatever reason, he doesn’t respond.

    in reply to: need help! parvo survivor puppy with giardia #89427 Report Abuse
    anonymously
    Member

    You are welcome. I will follow. He has been very helpful to me regarding various issues I have had with my pets. Helped me make some decisions.

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 749 total)