Search Results for 'presoak kibble'

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  • #153600
    anonymous
    Member

    “What would you say is a “reasonable amount of time”?

    Three months without significant improvement. Ten days or sooner if symptoms get worse or are severe.
    Ask your General Practice Vet for a referral to a specialist. It may be cost effective in the long run.

    You must follow the instructions of your General Practice Vet exclusively, diet and all, if you want to see results.
    Listening to folks on the internet/forums will only sabotage the dog’s treatment and decrease the chance for positive results. Stop messing with the dog’s diet. Only feed what the treating vet recommends. You can add water/presoak the kibble if you want.

    There are NO veterinarians or veterinary nutritionists affiliated with this site.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by anonymous.
    anonymous
    Member

    https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-small-breed-adult-gold-food-for-dogs
    Fromm has several grain inclusive formulas.

    Kibble does nothing to clean teeth. If the dog needs a professional dental cleaning I would get it done then just brush the teeth once a day, ask the vet tech to demonstrate if you don’t know how. Or check youtube.

    You can presoak dry food in water in the fridg for a few hours, or just add a generous amount of water to the kibble prior to serving the dog will lap up the water to get to the food.
    Don’t free feed (leave food down all day)
    Or you could mix the kibble with a little canned food and add water.
    Serve 2 or 3 small meals per day.
    I would not rotate foods, that may cause GI upset in a senior dog.

    #135410
    anonymous
    Member

    It’s easier to digest and sometimes puppies don’t know to drink water so if you presoak/ add water you will know that she is getting adequate hydration.

    Just start mixing a little canned food of your choice in with the kibble, increase the amount of soft food till the kibble you don’t like is gone.

    Blue chicken and rice canned food is soft, I can find it at my market or check Chewy dot com.

    PS. start housebreaking by taking her outside every 2 hours, but don’ t expect too much right now, she is an infant.
    Oh, and you know she will cry at night. 🙁
    You’ll figure it out.

    #130415
    anonymous
    Member

    It depends on the type of stones, you may want to consider consulting with a specialist for follow up care. There are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.

    Below copied from a previous post:

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/

    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.

    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.

    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Regarding supplements, I would check with your vet first. He may recommend something specific for your dog”. Otherwise, I would be careful, not all supplements are benign.

    Good luck

    anonymous
    Member

    No.
    Have you checked the internet for prices? As long as your vet okays it you don’t have to buy it from him.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/
    Copied from a previous post:
    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.
    Work closely with your vet, when the dog has been stable 6 months to 1 year then you can talk about diet changes.
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266
    Good luck

    #129524

    In reply to: Crystals in Dog Urine

    anonymous
    Member

    https://bichonhealth.org/kidneysbladder/management-of-bichons-with-urinary-stones/

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/

    Copied from a previous post:
    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.
    Work closely with your vet, when the dog has been stable 6 months to 1 year then you can talk about diet changes.
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266
    Good luck

    #125457
    anonymous
    Member

    I would not make any changes in diet for at least a month. You can presoak the kibble in the fridg overnight in water to make sure the pup is getting adequate nutrition.
    Ideally the pup should stay with it’s mother and littermates till at least 10 weeks.

    I would make an appointment with a local vet asap to discuss a vaccination schedule and general advice and guidance.

    https://www.tractorsupply.com/know-how_pets-livestock_pet-care_pet-deworming-schedule-for-dogs-and-cats (excerpt below)
    At the age of 8 weeks, your puppy should get its first distemper / parvo combination vaccine, or 5-in-1 vaccine. It is also time to give the puppy the first dewormer to eliminate intestinal parasites such as roundworm or hookworm.

    PS: No milk additives!

    #120034
    anonymous
    Member

    Did you ask the vet why a prescription diet was prescribed? I would feed him soft food only if there is an issue with his trachea. Or presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridg.
    What other health issues does he have? Did the vet give you a diagnosis?
    If the problem is neurological then the food won’t make a difference anyway.

    I would stop focusing on dog food ingredients. Just find something that agrees with him.
    Ask the vet if you can mix the prescription stuff in with the food that he likes?
    Leave a message for the vet to call you back when he has a minute. Have a list of questions ready. As far as I know, most vets don’t charge for phone calls.

    PS: Ask for a complete copy of all your dogs records, this is better than having them faxed. You should keep your own records anyway.

    You can bring a copy of them with you to the new vet.

    #115371
    anonymous
    Member

    @ Jason O

    I hope that you will consider continuing to work closely with your vet regarding your dog’s diet.

    Kidney disease is a serious illness and requires the expertise of a veterinary health professional for treatment and management.

    You can presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridg, ask your vet about adding a spoonful of plain chicken broth to meals?

    Nausea is a common symptom of kidney disease.

    PS: Be careful. Don’t fall down the homeopathic rabbit hole.
    Science based veterinary medicine is best.
    Hope this helps http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=kidney+disease

    #113167
    anonymous
    Member

    Per the search engine: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/bladder+stones/
    See my posts
    Also regarding prescription food:
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/
    I have used Royal Canin SO for a dog for a dog with bladder stones with good results.
    Zignature is a quality food, copy the ingredient list from Chewy and show your vet, maybe the dog could have that? Or, 1/2 and 1/2 with the prescription food? Check with your vet.
    Whatever you feed, add water and maybe soft food, presoak kibble and add water.
    Dogs that get bladder stones often have a genetic predisposition (struvite and calcium oxalate are the most common), not enough water is another contributing factor.
    Has she had an x-ray/ultrasound to rule out bladder stones? Because, they can have more than one type of stones. This also. can result in recurrent urinary tract infections.
    Add water to the kibble, and you can also presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridge prior to serving.
    Offer frequent bathroom breaks/opportunities to urinate, keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conductive to stone formation.
    Don’t free feed, 2 or 3 small meals a day is better and always have fresh water available. Maybe add a little plain chicken broth (no onion) to the kibble.
    A blocked urethra is a medical emergency and can result in surgery to save the dog’s life.
    Did the vet talk to you about prescription meds for stubborn cases? Don’t confuse supplements with medication.
    Work with your vet, prescription food and all, when the dog has been stable for 6 months to 1 year you can discuss diet changes.
    Use the search engine here to see more threads on this topic.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    Ps: You may find some helpful information here http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=urinary+tract+infection

    #113166
    anonymous
    Member

    Copied from a previous post:
    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.
    Work closely with your vet, when the dog has been stable 6 months to 1 year then you can talk about diet changes.
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266
    Good luck

    anonymous
    Member

    Zignature or Nutrisca or Pro Plan Focus for sensitive skin and stomach are good kibbles (for a base)
    What works for my dogs is to add some cooked chopped chicken or boiled egg, use the kibble as a base 1/2 to 2/3rds of the meal and always add water or plain chicken broth.
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/help-food-change-disaster/#post-111832
    PS: I would start with the prescription kibble recommended by the vet, at least as a base, presoaked in water.

    #109970
    anonymous
    Member

    I have never tried Evo, therefore I am not familiar with it.
    I have had good luck with Zignature whitefish and Nutrisca salmon.
    Both are grain free and potato free.
    Pro Plan Focus for sensitive stomach and skin is potato free, not grain free.
    Three or four small meals per day instead of two.

    The most important thing, as you have learned is, add water, presoak kibble too, if need be. Also, make sure to offer frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate.
    Stagnant conditions in the bladder contribute to stone formation.
    Some dogs just don’t drink enough, if at all. Combine that with a genetic predisposition and you have trouble.

    copied from one of my previous posts regarding a similar topic:
    “Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet”.
    “Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs”.

    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266

    #109553

    In reply to: Frequent UTIs

    anonymous
    Member

    Copied from a previous post:

    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.
    Work closely with your vet, when the dog has been stable 6 months to 1 year then you can talk about diet changes.
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.

    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266
    Good luck

    #109173
    anonymous
    Member

    Prescription food/therapeutic diet under the guidance of your veterinarian is how I would proceed.
    Increase fluids, add water to kibble and presoak kibble.
    Retest in a month or two or however your vet recommends.
    A lot of bogus information on the internet, don’t be fooled.

    Some science based veterinary medicine information here that you may find helpful
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/

    #108698
    anonymous
    Member

    First of all, if your dog appears to be having difficulty chewing kibble then he probably needs a dental exam, cleaning and extractions as needed. Then he will be able to eat any kibble you choose for him.

    I would schedule the vet appointment as soon as possible, senior checkup, labs and other testing as recommended by the veterinarian. Dental care for senior pets is very important.

    If your dog prefers softer food, you can always presoak the kibble in the fridg overnight prior to serving and it will be soft, the extra moisture is good for him too.

    #106066
    anonymous
    Member

    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.
    Work closely with your vet, when the dog has been stable 6 months to 1 year then you can talk about diet changes.
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Per the search engine: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/urinary+tract+infections/
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266
    Good luck

    #105363
    anonymous
    Member

    Okay, at 7 weeks the pup is an infant, it is a miracle that the pup can eat on it’s own, let alone walk. The pup pretty much needs 24/7 care.
    The pup requires several small feedings of soft food a day, fresh water available and a splash added to meals.
    At 12 weeks the pup should be out of the woods, for now, the pup is vulnerable to all kinds of problems.
    Don’t expect housebreaking to begin for at least a few weeks…..
    I would work closely with a veterinarian.
    PS: If you are feeding kibble, presoak overnight in water.

    #104899
    anonymous
    Member

    Per the search engine: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/bladder+stones/
    See my posts
    Also regarding prescription food:
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/
    I have used Royal Canin SO for a dog for a dog with bladder stones with good results.
    Zignature is a quality food, copy the ingredient list from Chewy and show your vet, maybe the dog could have that? Or, 1/2 and 1/2 with the prescription food? Check with your vet.
    Whatever you feed, add water and maybe soft food, presoak kibble and add water.

    Dogs that get bladder stones often have a genetic predisposition (struvite and calcium oxalate are the most common), not enough water is another contributing factor.
    Has she had an x-ray/ultrasound to rule out bladder stones? Because, they can have more than one type of stones. This also. can result in recurrent urinary tract infections.
    Add water to the kibble, and you can also presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridge prior to serving.
    Offer frequent bathroom breaks/opportunities to urinate, keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conductive to stone formation.
    Don’t free feed, 2 or 3 small meals a day is better and always have fresh water available. Maybe add a little plain chicken broth (no onion) to the kibble.
    A blocked urethra is a medical emergency and can result in surgery to save the dog’s life.
    Did the vet talk to you about prescription meds for stubborn cases? Don’t confuse supplements with medication.
    Work with your vet, prescription food and all, when the dog has been stable for 6 months to 1 year you can discuss diet changes.
    Use the search engine here to see more threads on this topic.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    Ps: You may find some helpful information here http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=urinary+tract+infection

    #104740
    anonymous
    Member

    Are his teeth okay (you can’t tell by looking). When was his last dental exam? Dental x-rays? They can have root remnants that need extraction, this can cause pain, not visible until the cleaning is underway and x-rays are done (general anesthesia) They are usually in and of the vet clinic the same day, within a few hours.
    I ask because I have had several small breeds and none of them had any trouble eating kibble regardless of the size, unless they had periodontal disease and needed a professional dental cleaning and extractions.
    That being said, some dogs do better if the kibble is presoaked in water prior to serving, or maybe the dog would prefer soft/canned food.

    #104713
    anonymous
    Member

    See my posts regarding dementia in this thread
    .https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/blood-work-still-off/

    I would give small frequent meals, presoaked in water if you are using kibble. Wet food is fine, whatever works.

    Talk to your vet, ask about medication, see what he recommends. Especially to get through the night.
    If possible, keep him awake during the day, take him for walks as tolerated.

    PS:You may find this site helpful. https://dogdementia.com/treatment/

    #104016
    anonymous
    Member

    Presoak the food in plain homemade (no onion) chicken broth or water, skip the veggies and mussels or maybe there is something in the supplement he doesn’t like?
    Did your vet discuss prescription medication for pain management of arthritis with you?
    Add a splash of water to meals, don’t leave food down (free feed).
    Don’t panic unless he eats nothing times 3 days, as long as he is drinking water.
    I assume he will. Call the vet if he doesn’t.

    PS: How about adding a little of the old kibble that he likes in with the prescription food…for now.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by anonymous.
    #103130
    anonymous
    Member

    Add warm water to soften the kibble or presoak kibble overnight in the fridge.
    Also, maybe mix with soft food.

    #102994
    anonymous
    Member

    Bump (response from previous thread on the same subject)
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Bump (response from a previous thread on the same subject)
    Per the search engine: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/urinary+tract+infections/
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry

    I’m hoping someone might find this information helpful (even if the op doesn’t) 🙂
    After all, this topic comes up at least once a week.

    #102935

    In reply to: Prescription Diet

    anonymous
    Member

    Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem.
    Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation.
    Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7.
    Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog.

    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.

    #102672
    anonymous
    Member

    Dogs that get bladder stones often have a genetic predisposition (struvite and calcium oxalate are the most common), not enough water is another contributing factor.
    Has she had an x-ray/ultrasound to rule out bladder stones? Because, they can have more than one type of stones. This also. can result in recurrent urinary tract infections.
    Add water to the kibble, and you can also presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridge prior to serving.
    Offer frequent bathroom breaks/opportunities to urinate, keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conductive to stone formation.
    Don’t free feed, 2 or 3 small meals a day is better and always have fresh water available. Maybe add a little plain chicken broth (no onion) to the kibble.
    A blocked urethra is a medical emergency and can result in surgery to save the dog’s life.
    Did the vet talk to you about prescription meds for stubborn cases? Don’t confuse supplements with medication.
    Work with your vet, prescription food and all, when the dog has been stable for 6 months to 1 year you can discuss diet changes.
    Use the search engine here to see more threads on this topic and others.

    Ps: You may find some helpful information here http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=urinary+tract+infection
    Btw: I’d skip the supplements, glucosamine and such. They don’t really help and could contribute to the formation of bladder stones.
    Increase water intake and frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate is your best bet, just add water to the kibble of your choice, they lap it up to get to the food.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #102642
    anonymous
    Member

    I would stop all supplements. I might try Pro Plan Focus Sensitive Stomach as a base. Add a tablespoon of cooked ground turkey or something.
    Add water or/and presoak with water. Don’t free feed (leave kibble out all day)
    Two feedings per day, maybe a bite of something for a snack once or twice a day.
    Long walks as tolerated.
    Give the dog some time to adjust, the symptoms you describe most likely may be stress related.

    #102627
    a c
    Member

    I am in process of slowly transition her to Purina Smartblend Weight Management kibbles( this is my vet’s suggestion). Currently is 50/50. I presoaked the kibbles. I also add some fresh zucchini, squash, blueberries, and add additional water to the mixture. She also gets 1tsp cottage cheese and 2 slices of Apple for snack.

    However, it seems like her stool is little on the hard side. What can I do to make it little softer?

    #102587
    anonymous
    Member

    Zignature or Fromm
    Zignature is Adult, All Stages
    Fromm has a puppy food.
    I never have used a “puppy food” I go right to adult, I also do not rotate. I stick with one brand I am happy with. My current favorite is Zignature Whitefish kibble as a base.
    You are on the right track adding water and/or presoaking. Many dogs don’t drink enough water which can lead to bladder stones later on, especially if they have a predisposition.

    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #102582
    a c
    Member

    I have a 8 weeks old miniature schnauzer puppy. He weight almost 4 lbs. I got him when he was 6 weeks old. I was told by the breeder that he is eating puppy chow kibbles soaked in the water. I quickly switched him to Orijen puppy food with no problem. I still presoaked the kibbles in the water. He loves the food. I am just afraid the fat content on Orijen is on the higher end. He also get apples and low fat cottage cheese for treats.

    I like to get maybe one or two more quality puppy food to rotate. Can anyone make some suggestions?

    #102477
    anonymous
    Member

    Cancer tends to be genetic, some cancers such as hemangiosarcoma strike between 8 and 10 years of age. Often, by the time they show symptoms, it is too late.

    Some dogs do better on canned food (especially seniors). You can presoak kibble in the fridg overnight, also, adding a splash of water is a good idea, a lot of dogs don’t drink enough water.

    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #102471
    anonymous
    Member

    Dogs that get bladder stones often have a genetic predisposition (struvite and calcium oxalate are the most common), not enough water is another contributing factor.
    Has she had an x-ray/ultrasound to rule out bladder stones? Because, they can have more than one type of stones. This also. can result in recurrent urinary tract infections.
    Add water to the kibble, and you can also presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridge prior to serving.
    Offer frequent bathroom breaks/opportunities to urinate, keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conductive to stone formation.
    Don’t free feed, 2 or 3 small meals a day is better and always have fresh water available. Maybe add a little plain chicken broth (no onion) to the kibble.
    A blocked urethra is a medical emergency and can result in surgery to save the dog’s life.
    Did the vet talk to you about prescription meds for stubborn cases? Don’t confuse supplements with medication.
    Work with your vet, prescription food and all, when the dog has been stable for 6 months to 1 year you can discuss diet changes.
    Use the search engine here to see more threads on this topic.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    Ps: You may find some helpful information here http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=urinary+tract+infection

    #101795
    anonymous
    Member

    What are you feeding her?

    Dogs can suffer from depression, just like people. She may be grieving her former family.
    Dogs bond with people even if they were not treated well (think Stockholm Syndrome).

    Have you tried presoaking the kibble? And then mix it with a bite of people food.
    I would give her some time…..

    Ps: I hope you are not free feeding, leaving kibble down all day, not a good idea.

    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #101507
    anonymous
    Member

    What is the big deal about adding a spoonful of real food (chopped cooked chicken breast, lean cooked hamburger, a bite of scrambled egg) mixed in with the kibble. Feed twice a day, measured amounts, pick up after 10 minutes and store in fridg offer at the next meal time.
    Let him skip meals, as long as he is drinking water, if he doesn’t eat times 3 days (he will) consult your vet.
    Always have fresh water available, in fact add a little to the kibble and or presoak kibble, especially for seniors.
    All kibble is like cereal, no matter how much you pay for it, dry and boring.
    How would you like to eat nothing but cheerios for the rest of your life? You might be inclined to skip a meal or two, lol
    Ps: If you boil a chicken breast in a little water you will have a pseudo broth (3 day supply) that you can pour over the kibble along with a bite of chicken
    Zignature is a quality dry food, maybe he would prefer that? My small breeds vomited when I fed them Orijen, also, the product has changed.

    #101215
    anonymous
    Member

    How about 4 or 5 small meals several times a day instead of 1 or 2 big meals. Same amount of food, just divided up.
    I would presoak the kibble overnight (fridg). I would stick with the prescription food till she’s stable or as your vet recommends.
    When you go to commercial dog food, I would look for a kibble with no potato, such as Zignature Whitefish. Some dogs with sensitive stomachs find potato and sweet potato hard to digest.
    Make sure she is drinking water, if not, add a splash to the presoaked kibble.
    Continue to work with your vet, and I wouldn’t dispense over the counter meds unless okayed by the vet. Good luck
    Ps: ask your vet if it would be okay to add a bite of boiled chopped chicken breast or homemade plain chicken broth (no onion) to her kibble?

    #100969
    anonymous
    Member

    Have you been back to the vet? Was she diagnosed with a specific condition?
    If she has been medically cleared, I would just add a bite of chopped cooked lean chicken breast or scrambled egg or cooked ground turkey to her kibble, add a splash of water, maybe presoak with water or homemade plain chicken broth. Measured feedings 2 or 3 times a day. Don’t leave food down.
    I had a dog that would only eat off of a mat, just find an attractive small mat and think of it as her bowl, don’t try to force her to do something she is uncomfortable with. Make sure she is drinking water, add a little to her meals, to be on the safe side,
    At 5 months, she must be teething, give her a 1/2 raw carrot to chew on to soothe her gums.
    Small breeds are especially vulnerable to periodontal disease (down the road) so start daily dental brushings now, it helps.
    Ps: She will be going into heat in the next 2-3 months…..so, decide what you want to do, or not do, about that.

    #100817

    In reply to: Food stuck in throat?

    anonymous
    Member

    Good luck. Nothing wrong with adding water/broth or presoaking kibble, in my experience.
    Of course they will need to have more frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate.
    But, I think it’s worth it. Kibble is so dry.

    Ps: Your dogs sound like they are getting excellent care, I was just erring on the side of safety with my advice.

    #100661

    In reply to: Food stuck in throat?

    anonymous
    Member

    He might just have a narrow trachea…make sure you discuss the next time you bring him to the vet.
    I used to presoak food for a senior. I would put the kibble in water and leave in the fridge overnight, either that, or soft food.

    #100260
    anonymous
    Member

    I don’t think the homeopathic stuff will help, in fact it may make him worse.
    I would go back to the vet that knows him best and go by his advice.

    Sorry, but that’s all I’ve got. I would focus on care and comfort, rather than aggressive measures.
    Make sure to add water/presoak his kibble and offer frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate, regarding the bladder stones.

    PS: Those supplements you mentioned are not a good idea, most supplements are scams.
    I prefer science based veterinary medicine.
    I have found this site helpful http://skeptvet.com/Blog/

    • This reply was modified 4 years ago by anonymous.
    #99507
    anonymous
    Member

    Nutrisca is my favorite. Add water to the kibble. Do not leave food down. Feed 2 X per day (or 3 small meals), measured amounts add water to the kibble or presoak overnight. Use the kibble as a base, add a bite of real food, a spoonful of scrambled egg (no milk) or chopped cooked chicken, lean meat.

    Ps: Make sure they are getting enough exercise, frequent bathroom breaks. Walk for at least 1 hour a day, time divided up/leisurely is okay.
    If they are being crated/caged all day, you may want to reevaluate, it can be stressful.
    Food is only a small part of it…
    But, you may want to go along with the recommended prescription food, at least till the pups are stable.

    #98368
    anonymous
    Member

    Wonderful news. Now, please play it safe and keep him on a bland diet, maybe 1/2 cooked chopped chicken and rice or something, but use a quality kibble with water added or presoaked as a base (1/2 of the diet).
    Two or three meals per day.
    You dodged a bullet, stay away from that raw, homeopathic crap. Just my opinion based on the fact that I don’t enjoy going to the emergency veterinary clinic. I tried that stuff too, back when, with negative results. No thank you.

    #98152
    anonymous
    Member

    Apoquel is prescribed for environmental allergies. If the dog responded to the Apoquel, that’s diagnostic. Apoquel has no effect on food sensitivies or food allergies. Food allergies are rare.
    Environmental allergies tend to wax and wane, some allergens are seasonal. Making it almost impossible to tell which food is working best.
    Per the search engine https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/
    I would make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist for the best results to get an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment.
    Make sure your dog is drinking water, add a splash or presoak his kibble if he has a sensitive stomach.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 1 month ago by anonymous.
    #97741
    anonymous
    Member

    Addendum:
    What food did your veterinarian recommend? It doesn’t sound like you are overfeeding him.
    You can presoak the kibble in water or plain homemade (nothing added, boiled chicken water)broth. I would say no snacks, except maybe a raw carrot here and there.
    How about: https://www.chewy.com/natural-balance-fat-dogs-chicken/dp/46804 Only 250 calories per cup!

    I hope these articles help: https://www.mspca.org/pet_resources/the-skinny-on-pet-diets/
    and https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/choosing-the-right-diet-for-your-pet/

    I would increase the walks, even if they are slow and leisurely.
    PS: Brush his teeth once a day, they love chicken flavored toothpaste.

    #97249
    anonymous
    Member

    I wouldn’t mess around with his diet, If the stones return it may be difficult for him to tolerate another surgery.as a senior (age11)
    Add water, presoak the kibble with water, add plain homemade chicken broth (no onions or additives)
    Put a call into your vet to call you back when he has a minute. Ask him what you can add as a topper.
    I think your vet will confirm, water added to meals and frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate are important..

    #96874
    anonymous
    Member

    Go what the vet that has examined them recommends. I would give no snacks except raw carrots (1/4) to chew on once or twice a day. Add water to their kibble. In fact, if you presoak it, it puffs up and they think they are getting more.
    I would find a way to increase their activity, more walks around the block, even if leisurely and only for a few minutes at a time.
    Swimming is the best activity for burning calories and it’s easy on the joints for seniors.
    By any chance, do you have pet health insurance? I ask, because I have heard that if the vet orders aqua therapy (swimming in a heated pool, offered at pet rehab facilities) for weight loss or a medical condition it may be covered. One minute of swimming equals 4 minutes of running.

    #95575
    anonymous
    Member

    That’s what I do . It seems to work, depending on the dog, sometimes I go half and half, if It agrees with them. I use a quality kibble as a base. I suppose I do decrease the amount of kibble by adding a topper.
    I like to give them some real food, I don’t trust kibble alone to do that
    Sometimes I add some plain homemade chicken broth instead of water. I had a dog that developed bladder stones because he didn’t drink enough fluids. That’s why I do that. For seniors I presoak the kibble.

    PS: Don’t go by the recommended amount on the bag of kibble, it’s usually too much (IMO)
    Start with the lowest amount…

    #95139

    In reply to: Diet Recommendations?

    anonymous
    Member

    Sounds good, I know what you are talking about. My dogs get less exercise this time of year too.
    Has he had lab work to rule out thyroid issues or other medical conditions that would cause him to gain weight?
    Other than trying the prescription food, I don’t see what you could do. I would hesitate to decrease the amount of food. You could presoak about half of the kibble in the fridg overnight, it expands and gets all puffy and so they think they are getting more food 🙂

    #94580
    anonymous
    Member

    You could try presoaking the kibble in water or plain homemade chicken broth (no onion or additives) overnight in the fridg prior to serving. Maybe mix a little of the prescription food in with it.
    My small breed does well on Nutrisca salmon and chickpea as a base.

    #94496

    In reply to: Struvite Crystals

    anonymous
    Member

    Water, water, and more water, add it to the food, presoak the kibble, tap water is fine. Take them out for frequent bathroom breaks. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to stone formation. Keep the bladder flushed.
    There is a genetic component.
    There are no magic supplements, however, there are prescription meds for stubborn cases you could discuss the options with your vet.
    And at the risk of repeating myself. There is nothing wrong with prescription foods. Have you read the prior posts and threads per the search engine, lots of info has been provided.
    Good luck.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by anonymous.
    #94493

    In reply to: recurrent uti's

    anonymous
    Member

    Please use the search engine under sign in to look up “bladder stones”. and ” struvite” lots of information there that you may find helpful.

    Has he had an x-ray/ultrasound to rule out bladder stones? Because, they can have more than one type of stones. This also. can result in recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Add water to the kibble, and also presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridge prior to serving.
    Offer frequent bathroom breaks/opportunities to urinate, keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conductive to stone formation.

    Don’t free feed, 2 or 3 small meals a day is better and always have fresh water available. Maybe add a little plain chicken broth (no onion) to the kibble.

    A blocked urethra is a medical emergency and can result in surgery to save the dog’s life.
    Did the vet talk to you about prescription meds for stubborn cases? Don’t confuse supplements with medication.

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/bladder+stones/

    Work with your vet, prescription food and all, when the dog has been stable for 6 months to 1 year you can discuss diet changes.

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