Search Results for 'idiopathic seizures'

Dog Food Advisor Forums Search Search Results for 'idiopathic seizures'

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  • #135382

    anonymous
    Member

    PS: If your dog is diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy (neurological disorder) speak to your vet about signing a waiver regarding vaccines.

    A good diet may help (avoid rosemary) but it won’t prevent seizures.

    #135379

    anonymous
    Member

    None that I know of. Idiopathic epilepsy is a neurological disorder. There are several medications that will significantly decrease the frequency of seizures so that the dog does not have to suffer.
    The general rule of thumb is if the dog is having 1 seizure or more per month or the seizures are severe, medication is indicated.
    Uncontrolled seizures can lead to brain damage and much stress and anxiety for the animal.

    Best thing to do would be to take her to see your vet about treatment options asap.

    #130130

    anonymous
    Member

    Per the search engine. Hope this helps: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/idiopathic+seizures/
    Seizures in canines are often idiopathic (unknown cause) and genetic. It’s neurological. Like a brainstorm that will occur at certain intervals, of course sensitivities could trigger, things like thunderstorms can lower the seizure threshold.
    Probably best to avoid unnecessary additives and chemicals and make sure the dog is getting adequate exercise.
    If he has more than 1 seizure a month the vet will advise medication, this is necessary and will help him.
    Uncontrolled seizures can lead to brain damage, not to mention the suffering and confusion the dog experiences.
    I had a dog with seizures that lived to old age on a daily low dose of phenobarbital. Listen to your vet regarding diet recommendations, I didn’t avoid any particular foods. However, a simple ingredient food might make sense. I like Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea
    Also, ask your vet about a rabies vaccine waiver, he may qualify, if he is diagnosed with a neurological disorder.

    #120336

    anonymous
    Member

    My small breed was on a daily low dose of phenobarbital for over 10 years, no side effects.
    He was alert and active. He had been diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy at a young age just by his behavior and symptoms. This was years ago. The vet may recommend annual routine lab work, see what she says.
    Sometimes they can have break through seizures but they tend to be infrequent and mild.

    Write down all your questions so that you can go over them with the vet. Please don’t let people discourage you and tell you medications are bad. They were invented for a reason and have helped many pets and people. Any medication that is effective could have possible side effects. Don’t get hung up on that.
    Too bad the vet you spoke to couldn’t start the medication today? Did you call and ask? They won’t charge you for phone calls, I hope :-/

    #118631

    In reply to: Frontline Side Effects


    anonymous
    Member

    Next time you talk to the vet, ask her if it could be idiopathic epilepsy.
    Also, if your dog is sensitive to the ingredients in flea/tick preventives. I might be inclined to try the Seresto collar, discuss with your vet.

    If your dog is diagnosed with seizures (neurological disorder) talk to your vet about vaccinations, ask what is absolutely necessary, some vets may advise against……

    #118442

    Becca
    Member

    Idiopathic seizures can be caused by food.
    Holistic and homeopathic is the best way to go!
    Feeding raw does wonders.

    #118395

    anonymous
    Member

    How long have you had the dog? No, idiopathic seizure disorder is not caused by food.

    Environmental allergies are not caused by food.

    The dog may need an anticonvulsant for the rest of her life. Sure there are triggers, in fact I would avoid vaccines with this dog and ask your vet to sign a waiver (rabies vaccine).

    Regarding allergies, see a veterinary dermatologist. Food allergies are rare.

    Use the search engine here at this site to look up “environmental allergies” and “seizures” and see my posts.

    Unfortunately, these issues may be why the dog was given up. There are good vets out there that will help you.

    Bottom line, it will cost about $1000 to $2000 a year to keep this dog comfortable.

    I could be way off, as only a veterinarian that has examined the dog and reviewed it’s history can advise you accordingly.

    PS: Be careful, don’t fall down the homeopathic rabbit hole.

    #116757

    anonymous
    Member

    @ Eileen

    A veterinary neurologist would be your best bet if the regular vet has not been helpful.
    The correct medication and dosage is key in treating idiopathic epilepsy.
    I had a dog that did well on a low dose of phenobarbitol for years, no side effects.
    But, that was a long time ago, there are other medications that they use now too, as Taylor mentioned.

    Uncontrolled seizures are very stressful for a dog and can result in more neurological damage and other medical issues.

    #116659

    Eileen L
    Member

    Good morning all. I am a member of this unhappy club. I have a three year old boxer who has had three of these episodes in the past nine months, each worst than the one before. No bloat, clean stool, no traumas. Sila was a happy go lucky girl but along with these episodes has also developed anxiety in the care.

    My last Boxer Nysa, started having similar activity at age 8 and was ultimately diagnosed with idiopathic seizures. I really think that is what is going on here. Sila is at the vet as we speak for ultrasound to see if there is anything to see. I doubt they will see anything as the ER vet did xrays and there was nothing of note.

    When not having these issues, which like many folks here always occur at night out of the blue, she is happy, playful, eats well, has good stool, etc. I have another dog who eats what she eats and he is fine, though I know not all diets suit all dogs.

    So my question is directed at those folks who have tried the anti-convulsants. Have you had long term success and do you find one drug better than another? I am only familiar with Pheno. Any and all input is most welcome and appreciated. Thank you !

    #109170

    anonymous
    Member

    @ Patty R

    It sounds like the veterinary er treated the dog’s condition as an acute emergency

    It is very important that you follow up with your regular vet and/ or a specialist (neurologist) asap.

    Please read some of prior posts.

    An accurate diagnosis and the correct treatment is crucial. You won’t find that on the internet.

    Often it may just be getting started the right medication, if it’s a seizure disorder. This shouldn’t be too expensive and will stop the suffering you are seeing.
    She is at the age when idiopathic epilepsy shows up. It is treatable and will not effect her longevity
    But untreated seizures will cause more damage. Her condition may not be diet related, other than possible
    environmental and dietary triggers.

    #97577

    anonymous
    Member

    Per the search engine. Hope this helps: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/idiopathic+seizures/

    Seizures in canines are often idiopathic (unknown cause) and genetic. It’s neurological. Like a brainstorm that will occur at certain intervals, of course sensitivities could trigger, things like thunderstorms can lower the seizure threshold.
    Probably best to avoid unnecessary additives and chemicals and make sure the dog is getting adequate exercise.
    If he has more than 1 seizure a month the vet will advise medication, this is necessary and will help him.
    Uncontrolled seizures can lead to brain damage, not to mention the suffering and confusion the dog experiences.
    I had a dog with seizures that lived to old age on a daily low dose of phenobarbital. Listen to your vet regarding diet recommendations, I didn’t avoid any particular foods. However, a simple ingredient food might make sense. I like Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea
    Also, ask your vet about a rabies vaccine waiver, he may qualify, if he is diagnosed with a neurological disorder.

    #92427

    anonymous
    Member

    What you describe sounds like seizure activity, pre-ictal, ictal and post-ictal. At age 14 your dog is elderly (even for a small breed). It may be idiopathic, or age related.
    I doubt if your vet would recommend extensive testing and x-rays at her age to rule out brain tumor. As the treatment options may be limited anyway. I would focus on care and comfort. I agree that feeding 3 or 4 small meals a day works better for a senior than 1 or 2. I would add a little water to her meals. Walks/exercise as tolerated. I would discuss medication options with your vet that may decrease seizures. I would avoid vaccines for this dog due to the diagnosis of a neurological disorder. Discuss these things with your vet, don’t be afraid to ask him to call you when he has a minute, make a list of your questions and have it ready. She may do better on a bland diet, however, her neurological issues may not be diet related.

    #90049

    anonymously
    Member

    You’re welcome. How old is the dog? I find idiopathic seizures start when they are young adults (9 months-1year). Of course, a healthy diet, exercise, keeping weight within normal limits will help, but it won’t stop the seizures.
    If they are occurring more than once a month and or are severe, I would not hesitate to start medication. If you have any doubts, you could consult a veterinary neurologist, but usually the regular vet can treat this.
    It doesn’t change their personality if they are on anticonvulsants, not from what I have observed, anyway.
    PS: When the dog has been stable for a while, maybe a year, you can work with your vet to taper the dog off of meds for a trial period and see what happens…..

    #90041

    anonymously
    Member

    From one of my previous posts:

    Seizures in canines are often idiopathic (unknown cause) and genetic. It’s neurological. Like a brainstorm that will occur at certain intervals, of course sensitivities could trigger, things like thunderstorms can lower the seizure threshold.
    Probably best to avoid unnecessary additives and chemicals and make sure the dog is getting adequate exercise.
    If he has more than 1 seizure a month the vet will advise medication, this is necessary and will help him.
    Uncontrolled seizures can lead to brain damage, not to mention the suffering and confusion the dog experiences.
    I had a dog with seizures that lived to old age on a daily low dose of phenobarbital. Listen to your vet regarding diet recommendations, I didn’t avoid any particular foods. However, a simple ingredient food might make sense. I like Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea
    Also, ask your vet about a rabies vaccine waiver, he may qualify, if he is diagnosed with a neurological disorder.

    #87159

    anonymously
    Member

    From another one of my previous posts:

    Seizures in canines are often idiopathic (unknown cause) and genetic. It’s neurological. Like a brainstorm that will occur at certain intervals, of course sensitivities could trigger, things like thunderstorms can lower the seizure threshold.
    Probably best to avoid unnecessary additives and chemicals and make sure the dog is getting adequate exercise.
    If he has more than 1 seizure a month the vet will advise medication, this is necessary and will help him.
    Uncontrolled seizures can lead to brain damage, not to mention the suffering and confusion the dog experiences.
    I had a dog with seizures that lived to old age on a daily low dose of phenobarbital. Listen to your vet regarding diet recommendations, I didn’t avoid any particular foods. However, a simple ingredient food might make sense. I like Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea
    Also, ask your vet about a rabies vaccine waiver, he may qualify, if he is diagnosed with a neurological disorder. He is at the age (young adult) where seizures tend to appear.

    #87157

    anonymously
    Member

    It’s called Idiopathic Seizures, cause unknown , probably genetic. The old rule of thumb was, if the seizures are severe or occurring more than once a month, the veterinarian would recommend medication.

    From one of my previous posts via the search engine at this site:
    “This was years ago but my dog had (idiopathic) seizures that started at the age of 9 months, he did well on a low dose of phenobarb and lived to be 14”.

    “He was never drowsy or had any side effects, the vets may have other medications they use now”.
    “I would consider asking your vet about treatment options, or have him refer you to a neurologist”.

    “Otherwise the dog suffers, it’s like a fire storm in the brain when they are experiencing a seizure. Uncontrolled seizures can cause more neurological damage”. In example: brain damage.
    This is a neurological disorder….food won’t do much. That being said, it would be best to keep the diet simple to avoid possible triggers, look for a limited ingredient food. And of course avoid chemicals and vaccinations, he may qualify for a rabies vaccine waiver. Consider seeing a specialist ASAP.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 3 months ago by  anonymously.
    #83933

    anonymously
    Member

    This was years ago but my dog had (idiopathic) seizures that started at the age of 9 months, he did well on a low dose of phenobarb and lived to be 14.

    He was never drowsy or had any side effects, the vets may have other medications they use now.
    I would consider asking your vet about treatment options, or have him refer you to a neurologist.

    Otherwise the dog suffers, it’s like a fire storm in the brain when they are experiencing a seizure. Uncontrolled seizures can cause more neurological damage…..

    #83932

    anonymously
    Member

    Idiopathic seizures……sometimes there is no explanation. Keep the diet simple, avoid chemicals and junk. See what the vet recommends. I’d go with a quality kibble as a base. I’d skip the bones, been to the emergency place 2-3 times over the years, twice for GI blockage and another time for a broken tooth. All caused by feeding “raw meaty bones”.

    Don’t free feed if you want him to lose weight, feed measured amounts twice a day, pick up the food after 10 minutes if he doesn’t eat and store in the fridg, offer at the next mealtime.
    Have fresh water available, add a splash to his food if he’s not a drinker.
    Walk him for an hour a day, it may help decrease the frequency of seizures and aid with weight loss.
    Don’t be afraid of the medication, I had a peke who lived a long time on a low dose of phenobarbital. They can still have an occasional breakthrough seizure, but it is usually mild.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/nutrition/

    #80801

    anonymously
    Member

    Seizures in canines are often idiopathic (unknown cause) and genetic. It’s neurological. Like a brainstorm that will occur at certain intervals, of course sensitivities could trigger, things like thunderstorms can lower the seizure threshold.
    Probably best to avoid unnecessary additives and chemicals and make sure the dog is getting adequate exercise.
    If he has more than 1 seizure a month the vet will advise medication, this is necessary and will help him.
    Uncontrolled seizures can lead to brain damage, not to mention the suffering and confusion the dog experiences.
    I had a dog with seizures that lived to old age on a daily low dose of phenobarbital. Listen to your vet regarding diet recommendations, I didn’t avoid any particular foods. However, a simple ingredient food might make sense. I like Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea
    Also, ask your vet about a rabies vaccine waiver, he may qualify, if he is diagnosed with a neurological disorder. He is at the age (young adult) where seizures tend to appear.

    #71767

    In reply to: Seizures in my dog


    Anonymous
    Member

    No, I never noticed anything unusual in the morning. They all have those weird dreams where they are running in place, moving around, barking a little. But, not seizure activity.

    I don’t like the powders or sprays…they can become airborne, I really don’t want to inhale that stuff. I’m leaning toward the Virbac amitraz collars, in fact I am trying to order some now and they are sold out at a lot of places, that’s a good sign imo.

    It is very rare, but a brain tumor, among other medical conditions could cause seizure activity. The vet would have to do x-rays and maybe lab work to rule out, you don’t want to go there if you don’t have to.

    Most seizures are diagnosed as “idiopathic” which is a fancy medical term for saying, they don’t know what caused it.

    #69715

    In reply to: Seizures in my dog


    Anonymous
    Member

    This was years ago but my dog had (idiopathic) seizures that started at the age of 9 months, he did well on a low dose of phenobarb and lived to be 14.

    He was never drowsy or had any side effects, the vets may have other medications they use now.
    I would consider asking your vet about treatment options, or have him refer you to a neurologist.

    Otherwise the dog suffers, it’s like a fire storm in the brain when they are experiencing a seizure. Uncontrolled seizures can cause more neurological damage…..

    #56568

    Amy H
    Member

    Thanks!
    Bobby dog – from my initial research, I don’t necessarily need a low sodium diet so long as I keep his sodium intake consistent as it competes with the meds for absorption, so an increase in salt will lower the level of meds in his blood and a decrease in salt will increase his blood levels of the meds. But I will take a look at that list.
    Susan – I will look for that book. Is your list of supplements from it?
    BCnut (Patty Vaughn?) – his seizures started after eating the poison. He almost died. I don’t know what specific kind of poison. My vet has yet to see him or his chart, but in a pre-adoption phone conversation said that generally speaking, his concern with cutting back on KBr is that when you do that, if the seizures return they frequently no longer respond to the medication, so as long as he is free of side effects he would prefer to stick with what seems to be working. An article on canine-epilepsy-guardian-angels(dot)com advises waiting 1-2 years without seizures before phasing it out. But that might be geared toward idiopathic epilepsy, which of course we aren’t sure we are dealing with. I have 2 young 2-legged kids, and my daughter has asthma, so our house and yard are already pretty chemical-free.
    This is a lot to take in. Hope I haven’t bit off too much!

    #47712

    Sarah Y
    Member

    It’s highly doubtful that its the food unless there something specific in it that causes a very rare and allergic reaction to the food. I’m thinking it’s coincidental? Most epileptic dogs have their first seizures between 6 months and 5 years…or approximately that.

    The frustrating thing with idopathic seizures is there is no known cause. A neurologist might be able to pinpoint the cause of seizures though. When a cause can’t be found it’s idopathic, meaning they just don’t know what caused it and it’s your classic case of idiopathic seizures.

    With that said, we don’t know what caused the seizure and as stated above if it brings you piece of mind to stop the wellness food I would certainly understand. Seizures are very scary and not having answers makes it more frustrating.

    The good news is some dogs have one seizure and never have one ever again. We have a beagle who has seizures…he had his first at age 3, and second at age 4. Good luck to you! We certainly know how scary it is to you see your baby have a seizure.

    #42751

    Nancy A
    Member

    Hello,
    I hope things are going well with your dog. Please do not try to give your dog anything by mouth during or shortly after a seizure. Our 5-year-old Chihuahua mix began having grand mal seizures out of the blue about 5 years ago and was diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy after getting an MRI. You may want to go to MedHelp.org and read this topic:
    http://www.medhelp.org/posts/Dogs/Phenobarbital-side-effects–how-long/show/1525013?page=1
    While the topic is Phenobarbital, you will find a great deal of information there to help. Our little guy has been taking Phenobarbital, and his seizures are very mild now. It didn’t seem fair to him to not medicate him–especially because the seizures were so frequent. The doggie neurologist told us that if a dog had a grand mal seizure more than once every 3 to 4 months, he recommended medication. As a funny aside: we set an alarm that goes off at 8:00 AM and PM. We now call our guy, “the pill that goes off before the pill” because he gets the pill in a bit of dog food and gets very excited!
    Good luck. With expert help and a plan to follow, your dog will be fine.

    #38533

    Janis J
    Member

    My Australian Shepherd has idiopathic epilepsy. I just read an article in ‘Veterinary Practice News’ which recommends a ketogenic diet for epileptic dogs – in other words, a diet low in carbohydrates, moderate in proteins, and high in fat. I have encountered similar recommendations elsewhere. I have been looking at grain free dog foods, but none seems quite to fit the description. (My dog is being medicated but still has occasional seizures.) Any suggestions? Janis

    #23335

    MommyToCash
    Participant

    Hello, all–

    First time posting here.

    I adopted my dog in November of last year, so I am unfamiliar with his medical history. He had his first seizure while my mom was watching him for a week after Thanksgiving (end of November). Then, he had another seizure while I was home with my parents on Christmas Day.

    He was good on the seizures until last Sunday (again, we were at my parents), and then he had another one this morning (a week in between seizures this time). This is the FIRST time in 4 seizures that he has had one at my house.

    Now, when he is at my parents house, he eats the food that my mom feeds her dogs (which includes t/d Hill’s Prescription Diet for dental health). When he is at my house, I feed him Blue Buffalo Freedom Grain-Free. HOWEVER, he had his teeth cleaned on Monday (the day after the seizure before last), and the vet recommended I switch him to Hill’s t/d Prescription Diet for Dental Health. I just began giving him this food as his main food (replacing the grain free Blue Buffalo) on Friday of this week (3 days before seizure).

    My question is this: Could his seizures be related to the food? It seems like that to me, but I’m not sure. He has had a full blood work up and has no signs of epilepsy, so if he does have epilepsy, it is idiopathic in nature.

    Thanks!


    BlackAndTan
    Participant

    Hello everyone! First post here. Hope it’s not too long; just want to be thorough 🙂

    My Rottweiler is 6.2 years old with a history of seizures over the last year. Despite the fact it is unusual for dogs of his age and breed to be idiopathic epileptics, we found no evidence of underlying causes in his diagnostics. He is being treated with standard anti-seizure drugs and is doing well, by all measures.

    I’ve had him on Orijen for over 3 years. His neurologist and regular vet agree that grain-free is a particularly important factor for dogs with seizures.

    Over the last 9 months – maybe more? – he developed horrible gas. Seriously, his gas could peel the paint off the walls. In February, I switched his food from Orijen Adult to Orijen 6-fish and this coincided with a cluster of seizures, so I switched him back to be safe. I tried adding probiotics, but no help.

    In the last few months, his energy levels really dropped. He started acting sluggish, would drag on the leash, struggled to get up, etc. I worried about him but didn’t want to panic. I also considered it could be related to age: 6 is senior for a Rottie, I think. A few weeks ago he came down with haemmorhagic gastroenteritis and was hospitalized. But here’s where things get interesting: post-hospitalization and particularly when on the vet’s prescription GI diet (which I don’t even think is particularly high-quality), he has been a renewed dog. A ton more energy, zippy and peppy. His old self. And, the gas was COMPLETELY gone when off Orijen. Since being back on Orijen and off the vet food, the gas is creeping back.

    It’s time for a change. I do not want to see him get sluggish again and the gas certainly is not welcome. There was such a marked difference when he went off Orijen – from acting like an old senior to the endurance athlete he’s always been – that I feel strongly the food isn’t agreeing with him any more. And it isn’t just one suspicious bag; he’d shown these problems over the course of over ten bags of food.

    I welcome all suggestions for a high-quality grain-free alternative.
    I’d been looking into EVO but have read a lot about recalls.
    Ideally I’d like something low-sodium with a limited ingredient list.

    Thank you SO MUCH, everyone, in advance!!!

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