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  • #143533

    anonymous
    Member

    I have never tried any supplements for coprophagia, the price deterred me and the fact that they look like chemical junk? Also, you would have to give them to every dog in your household, plus I have heard that they don’t work.
    PS: Has the vet ruled out medical issues? Good article here : http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/coprophagia-eating-feces (excerpt below)
    Medical Problems to Rule Out
    Starvation, Malnutrition or Malabsorption Disorders
    If your dog isn’t getting sufficient food or isn’t able to digest the nutrition in his food, he may resort to coprophagia as a way to supplement his diet. Before doing anything else, it’s important to have your dog thoroughly examined by a veterinarian to rule out medical problems that could cause coprophagia.

    #143532

    anonymous
    Member

    I have had a dog or two over the years that was a feces eater (coprophagia)
    The only thing I found that worked, was to follow them around with a pooper scooper when you think they are due for a bowel movement, scoop and discard immediately, out of sight out of mind. After awhile they stop turning around to look for it. In my experience, it doesn’t matter what you feed them. Sometimes puppies will out grow this nasty habit as they mature. It is what it is. You cannot let these dogs alone with their feces.
    Has the vet ruled out medical issues?

    Excerpt from the article I provided via link below https://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/pet-behavior-training/coprophagia-eating-feces-behavior-in-dogs/

    Coprophagia is not an abnormal behavior for canines in certain situations. Bitches naturally consume their own pup’s feces – presumably, to keep the nest clean. This behavior provides a survival benefit as it prevents unhygienic conditions from developing in the nest; a state of affairs that could lead to disease. The biological drive to eat feces, which is implanted as a survival instinct, compels nursing bitches to ingest their pups’ feces.
    In addition, many puppies go through an oral stage in which they explore everything with their mouths, sometimes ingesting a variety of non-food items, including feces.

    As time goes by, the majority of pups eventually learn that food tastes better than feces and they swear off the stool-eating habit for the rest of their lives. Some older puppies may continue to eat feces for a few months, but most grow out of the habit after the first year.
    Barring nursing bitches, the majority of “normal” adult dogs have absolutely no interest in eating feces.
    Slow learners, “oral retentives,” and pups in which habits are easily ingrained may continue to engage in coprophagia well beyond the accepted “norm” and may engage in it to excess. Such hard-core coprophagics continue the behavior long after their peers have developed new interests. Dogs like this, that seem addicted to the habit, may best be described as “compulsive.”

    Below is a list of possible contributing factors though more than one may be operating in any one case.
    The opportunity to observe the dam eating stool
    High protein, low residue, puppy food
    Irregular feeding schedule
    Feeding inadequate amounts of food
    Under-stimulating environment
    Constant opportunity to ingest feces
    Inadequate attention/supervision

    #141225

    In reply to: Home made diet


    anonymous
    Member
    #119562

    anonymous
    Member

    Please see my previous posts in this thread, example https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/coprophagia-poop-eating-advice/#post-94786
    and https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/coprophagia-poop-eating-advice/#post-94787
    Don’t feed him for at least 3 hours prior to leaving him unattended, offer him a bathroom break just prior to leaving. Always have fresh water available 24/7

    #119560

    Anonymous

    My 4 months old maltese is eating his poop for almost a month now. i always pick up his poop when he’s done pooping outside our backyard. but if he had an accident on his play pen that is when he eats his poop. i tried the naturVet coprophagia stool eating deterrent and the meat tenderizer but he still eat his poop. any suggestion on how to make him stop eating his poop? thank you!

    #104715

    In reply to: Poop eating


    anonymous
    Member

    Follow the dog around when he is due for a bowel movement. Scoop and discard immediately. Out of sight, out of mind. After a while they stop turning around to look for it.
    You cannot leave these dogs alone with their feces.
    The supplements don’t work. They are expensive and you would have to treat every dog in the household.
    Do not free feed, if you feed twice a day it will be easier to predict when they will have a bowel movement.

    Per the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/coprophagia/

    #94787

    anonymous
    Member

    I have never tried any supplements for coprophagia, the price deterred me and the fact that they look like chemical junk? Also, you would have to give them to every dog in your household, plus I have heard that they don’t work.
    PS: Has the vet ruled out medical issues? Good article here : http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/coprophagia-eating-feces (excerpt below)
    Medical Problems to Rule Out
    Starvation, Malnutrition or Malabsorption Disorders
    If your dog isn’t getting sufficient food or isn’t able to digest the nutrition in his food, he may resort to coprophagia as a way to supplement his diet. Before doing anything else, it’s important to have your dog thoroughly examined by a veterinarian to rule out medical problems that could cause coprophagia.

    #94786

    anonymous
    Member

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/Coprophagia/
    I have had a dog or two over the years that was a feces eater (coprophagia)
    The only thing I found that worked, was to follow them around with a pooper scooper when you think they are due for a bowel movement, scoop and discard immediately, out of sight out of mind. After awhile they stop turning around to look for it. In my experience, it doesn’t matter what you feed them. Sometimes puppies will out grow this nasty habit as they mature. It is what it is. You cannot let these dogs alone with their feces.
    Has the vet ruled out medical issues?
    http://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/behavior-training/behavior-problems/coprophagia-in-dogs
    PS: Do not free feed. Feed at the same time, twice a day and you will be able to predict when the dog will have a BM.

    #94135

    anonymous
    Member

    Copied from a previous comment per the search engine.

    I have had a dog or two over the years that was a feces eater (coprophagia)
    The only thing I found that worked, was to follow them around with a pooper scooper when you think they are due for a bowel movement, scoop and discard immediately, out of sight out of mind. After awhile they stop turning around to look for it. In my experience, it doesn’t matter what you feed them. Sometimes puppies will out grow this nasty habit as they mature. It is what it is. You cannot let these dogs alone with their feces.
    Has the vet ruled out medical issues?
    http://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/behavior-training/behavior-problems/coprophagia-in-dogs
    PS: Do not free feed. Feed at the same time, twice a day and you will be able to predict when the dog will have a bowel movement.
    Or, feed once a day when you are able to take him out every 2 hours (after eating) for at least 3 times to offer bathroom breaks. A long walk/exercise will speed up the process of elimination. It works.
    Always have fresh water available.

    #92459

    anonymous
    Member

    Check the search engine here and return if you have any more questions.
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/Coprophagia/
    I have had a dog or two over the years that was a feces eater (coprophagia)
    The only thing I found that worked, was to follow them around with a pooper scooper when you think they are due for a bowel movement, scoop and discard immediately, out of sight out of mind. After awhile they stop turning around to look for it. In my experience, it doesn’t matter what you feed them. Sometimes puppies will out grow this nasty habit as they mature. It is what it is. You cannot let these dogs alone with their feces.
    Has the vet ruled out medical issues?
    http://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/behavior-training/behavior-problems/coprophagia-in-dogs
    PS: Do not free feed. Feed at the same time, twice a day and you will be able to predict when the dog will have a bowel movement.

    Or, feed once a day when you are able to take her out every 2 hours (after eating) for at least 3 times to offer bathroom breaks. A long walk/exercise will speed up the process of elimination. It works.
    Always have fresh water available.

    #86963

    anonymously
    Member

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/Coprophagia/

    I have had a dog or two over the years that was a feces eater (coprophagia)

    The only thing I found that worked, was to follow them around with a pooper scooper when you think they are due for a bowel movement, scoop and discard immediately, out of sight out of mind. After awhile they stop turning around to look for it. In my experience, it doesn’t matter what you feed them. Sometimes puppies will out grow this nasty habit as they mature. It is what it is. You cannot let these dogs alone with their feces.

    Has the vet ruled out medical issues?
    http://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/behavior-training/behavior-problems/coprophagia-in-dogs

    PS: Do not free feed. Feed at the same time, twice a day and you will be able to predict when the dog will have a BM.
    If he doesn’t finish after 10 minutes pick up the food, store in the fridg, and offer at the next mealtime.

    Regarding the undigested kibble, is he wolfing down his food? Eating too fast? Get him one of those stainless steel dome bowls that are designed to slow him down, you could find one online, most pet supply stores carry them. Are you mixing with a soft food? Maybe that would help. Or a topper like a little scrambled egg or chopped up cooked lean chicken/meat, ground turkey…mixed in. Then you could just use the kibble as a base and use a little less of it.

    You could pre-soak the kibble a little, hard kibble doesn’t clean teeth, brushing the teeth every day does, now would be a good time to start, YouTube has some “how to” videos.
    Most dogs don’t drink enough water anyway, so I would add a splash.

    Orijen is my current favorite, it does have hard solid kibble and keep in mind it is higher in calories than some other brands. I also like Nutrisca which has smaller kibble, I’ve been mixing them together with good results and may continue to do so.
    My neighbor’s dog does well on Fromm, medium sized kibble.

    #84962

    anonymously
    Member

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/Coprophagia/

    I have had a dog or two over the years that was a feces eater (coprophagia)

    The only thing I found that worked, was to follow them around with a pooper scooper when you think they are due for a bowel movement, scoop and discard immediately, out of sight out of mind. After awhile they stop turning around to look for it. In my experience, it doesn’t matter what you feed them. Sometimes puppies will out grow this nasty habit as they mature. It is what it is. You cannot let these dogs alone with their feces.

    What you describe regarding eating foreign objects is called “pica” ask your vet for more information and treatment options.

    Has the vet ruled out medical issues?
    http://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/behavior-training/behavior-problems/coprophagia-in-dogs

    PS: Do not free feed. Feed at the same time, twice a day and you will be able to predict when the dog will have a BM.


    Allie S
    Member

    Coprophagia – dog who eats their or other dogs poop

    Hi there, my dog BLUE (blue merle pomeranian, 1 year old on April 21, 8lbs, neutered) struggles with Coprophagia, I’ve researched online and it could be parasites (I’m getting him dewormed in about 2 hours at the vet), nutrients deficiency from his food, or some underlying health condition.. While I don’t think its a underlying health issue – I really am leaning towards it just being a repulsive behavior or not getting enough nutrients from his current dog food. Before I spend hundreds of dollars on tests for why he has Coprophagia, I would like to try to do the simple stuff first before I get myself neck deep.
    I try to pick up poop after they eliminate (I have a 5 year old pomapoo female – she is disgusted by even the thought of poop LOL), and I do pick up poop atleast 1 time a day, but of course I’m not perfect lol. My husband thinks he eats poop just to eat it, he eats everything he can get ahold of (frogs, plastic, dead bees, black widows, one time i broke glass and he ran from across the house to try and start eating it, yard mulch, rocks) you name it, he’s probably ate it when I’ve not looked or has had it in his mouth at one time & has given us numerous heart attacks – I literally watch him like a hawk 24/7 to prevent himself from ingesting something that could kill him…
    Anyways, I need recommendations on dog food varieties, Blue is currently on Acana Pacifica – he’s been on it since I’ve had him, we did try solid gold and blue buffalo but he just could not stop having diarrhea. The thing with Acana is his coat is phenomenal, but he legit poops about 3-5 times a day (big poops and small) no gas though. I’ve done some research and think I’ll be trying FROMM Gold Holistic… It doesn’t help that the dog food he’s currently on is like the most recommended premium stuff on the internet, but if anyone could give me recommendations on other dog foods I should try let me know – if somehow I could stop getting him to poop so often maybe he’d be healthier (in thinking of aspects where he absorbed more nutrients than the dog food he’s currently on therefore pooped less)? IDK LOL?
    Thank you in advance everyone!

    #83863

    anonymously
    Member
    #83860

    anonymously
    Member

    I have had a dog or two over the years that was a feces eater (coprophagia)

    The only thing I found that worked, was to follow them around with a pooper scooper when you think they are due for a bowel movement, scoop and discard immediately, out of sight out of mind. After awhile they stop turning around to look for it. In my experience, it doesn’t matter what you feed them. Sometimes puppies will out grow this nasty habit as they mature. It is what it is. You cannot let these dogs alone with their feces.

    Regarding the excess gas, I assume you have checked for anal gland blockage….

    PS: Do not free feed. Feed at the same time, twice a day and you will be able to predict when the dog will have a BM.
    Have you checked the search engine here? https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/coprophagia/

    #82664

    losul
    Member

    Interesting theory on the palatibilty enhancers, Dr Carol.

    I don’t think this is the one that Aimee referenced, but here is a survey/study that could give insight.

    http://www.associationofanimalbehaviorprofessionals.com/boze412010.pdf

    At least 50% of my dogs diet is homemade raw, with limited (35%) kibble, but I have had no experience with coprophagia so couldn’t help there.

    I found in the the following article in Can Vet, that seems to be relative to what you have asked.

    “The dog should be fed a consistent, good quality
    diet, high in fat and protein and low in carbohydrate,
    with no treats or scraps. Diets high in carbohydrate
    tend to enhance the drive to eat stool. The dry food
    component of the diet should be reduced and replaced
    with a high protein food. Although dry food is generally
    a good diet, it has been shown clinically that the
    above diet change will often lessen the drive to eat
    stool. The addition of vegetable oil (increased slowly
    over 7 days, to 15 mL/4.5 kg of body weight/day) is
    also helpful. Sufficient food should be given twice
    daily, on a regular schedule. Adding the fat and feeding
    twice a day helps suppress the appetite for a longer
    period, reducing this particular stimulus for stool
    eating. Often, a diet change, maintained for 4-8 weeks,
    may be all that is required to stop the behavior, in conjunction
    with the decreasing strength of the drive as
    the animal ages.”

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1680886/pdf/canvetj00575-0079.pdf

    #82641

    aimee
    Member

    Hi Dr. Carol,

    Dr Hart at UC Davis did an extensive survey on the topic which you can find summarized here:

    http://drsophiayin dot com/blog/entry/coprophagia-the-scoop-on-poop-eating-in-dogs

    Since you are a vet maybe you can get the full paper and see if there is more detail in it than is in the summary.

    #82632

    anonymously
    Member

    Has the vet ruled out medical issues? Good article here : http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/coprophagia-eating-feces (excerpt below)
    Medical Problems to Rule Out
    Starvation, Malnutrition or Malabsorption Disorders
    If your dog isn’t getting sufficient food or isn’t able to digest the nutrition in his food, he may resort to coprophagia as a way to supplement his diet. Before doing anything else, it’s important to have your dog thoroughly examined by a veterinarian to rule out medical problems that could cause coprophagia.
    .

    #82630

    anonymously
    Member

    No, never heard anything about it. I can tell you though, that I have had a dog or two over the years that was a feces eater (coprophagia)
    The only thing I found that worked, was to follow them around with a pooper scooper when you think they are due for a bowel movement, scoop and discard immediately, out of sight out of mind. After awhile they stop turning around to look for it. In my experience, it doesn’t matter what you feed them. Sometimes puppies will out grow this nasty habit as they mature. It is what it is. You cannot let these dogs alone with their feces.

    PS: Do not free feed, feed at the same time, twice a day and you will be able to predict when the dog will have a BM.
    Have you checked the search engine here? https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/coprophagia/

    #82629

    Carol B
    Member

    Is anyone aware of any research on the question of whether or not there is a connection between palatants and coprophagia?

    #79681

    In reply to: Coprophagia Deterrent


    anonymously
    Member

    The only thing that worked for my dogs that had developed this nasty habit was to follow them around, when they had a bowel movement, scoop/discard immediately.
    Out of sight, out of mind. After a while they stop turning around to look for it, lol.

    Also, if you are feeding 1 or 2 measured meals per day, you will learn the dog’s pattern and will be able to predict when he will have a bowel movement and avoid surprise eliminations.
    In other words don’t free feed, and don’t give them the opportunity to be alone with their feces. Some dogs outgrow it, but often it is something you will always have to keep a eye on.
    I have never tried any supplements for coprophagia, the price deterred me and the fact that they look like chemical junk? Also, you would have to give them to every dog in your household, plus I have heard that they don’t work.

    PS: Has the vet ruled out medical issues? Good article here : http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/coprophagia-eating-feces (excerpt below)
    Medical Problems to Rule Out
    Starvation, Malnutrition or Malabsorption Disorders
    If your dog isn’t getting sufficient food or isn’t able to digest the nutrition in his food, he may resort to coprophagia as a way to supplement his diet. Before doing anything else, it’s important to have your dog thoroughly examined by a veterinarian to rule out medical problems that could cause coprophagia.

    #79674

    Jeffrey S
    Member

    Anyone tried supplements for preventing a dog from eating poop? Any of them work? I’ve read that organ meats help, and there are freeze-dried supplements offered. Also, I’ve read that certain enzymes help. Any suggestions? Thanks.

    #75037

    Sam Koch
    Member

    Now when I watch my two dogs at home they do not eat their poop. Apparently my mom has seen it more to actually say something, though.
    We have two Chihuahuas about 4 lbs each. They get Merricks Grain Free Limited Ingredient food, they like the salmon.
    I really want to go get them checked for everything–like bloodwork, fecal, and urine tests but my mom doesn’t want to do it because she thinks it’s unnecessary.
    When we feed them we go by tablespoons and just keep offering until they walk away. They don’t eat in the morning so we started feeding them only at night, and they only eat about 3-4 tbsp. I really want them to eat more but they just won’t.
    I just need suggestions. I wish I could just take them to the vet but I don’t have any money at the moment.
    Sam

    #72701

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Hi Carrie-

    Yes, adding canned food and water would be the best for a dog with frequent UTIs. I buy four and five star budget friendly canned food at Walmart, Tractor Supply Stores and Costco to add to my dogs’ meals. Orijen is crazy expensive. I’ve never even thought about buying it! I have way too many mouths to feed to be able to afford that food. While the berries in the food are a good start, they are highly processed and probably not enough of them to be very medicinal for your situation.

    Here is a link on poop eating from holistic vet Dr. Becker: http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/08/23/coprophagia-poop-eating.aspx

    Hopefully this is helpful. Pineapple contains enzymes. That is why it is often recommended, but it does have to be fresh otherwise the enzymes are destroyed during processing. I wish I had understood that with my dogs because I was adding canned and it did not good. I think it just made it yummier!

    My pups have slowed down on that issue quite a bit, but one of them will still take a bite now and then. I am the one who usually picks up the poop. I am a poop nazi at our house. LOL! I cannot stand it when they smell like they have eaten it. And worse yet…..(this is very gross) but, if they throw up after eating it, I guarantee you that you will never, ever, ever want to have to clean up that again and it will cure you from not wanting to race out and clean it up before it gets eaten!!! Good luck!

    #72693

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Hi Carrie-
    Well, shoot, sounds like the food helped solve one issue, but maybe helped create another. As far as the UTI problem, adding moisture to the diet and providing frequent bathroom breaks is the best thing you can do. There are also several urinary and bladder support products on the market that contain cranberry or d-mannose that are also helpful. Do you add any canned food or water to their meals? Keeping their urinary tract flushed out is very important.
    Now, the very gross problem of stool eating (coprophagia). It is a very difficult one. There are many theories on why dogs do it. Since your dog only started after food change, it very well could be related to that. My dogs have always done it and none of the remedies have worked except for picking it up immediately. There are products you can buy that may help at most pet stores. Also digestive enzymes and/or fresh pineapple in their food are also frequently recommended. Good luck!

    #51105

    In reply to: orange liquid poop


    2nd2none
    Member

    yeah, flagyl usually works like a charm!
    transitioning feed should be a slow process, typically from 7-10 to help prevent stomach upset. *white meat should be used with the rice. avoid the dark, as it’s higher in fat and beef should be your last choice unless it’s REALLY lean. same deal with turkey: white meat and stay away from the skin=can cause pancreatitis~another issue….
    poop eating (coprophagia) has many different theories. from a nutritional deficiency to just being *really, really hungry. perhaps with the new feed, your dog will do well, get any nutrients he/she may be lacking and feel satisfied upon finishing his food. out of 7 i have one who will eat the other’s stool if i would let her, but being diligent about clean up and watching where she goes when out walking helps to ward off that unwanted behavior.
    best wishes.

    #38453

    T
    Member

    Coprophagia is normally a juvenile behavior that dogs outgrow. Some dogs may continue into adulthood. The behavior may have different origins, not the least of which is “stomach heat” and inadequate nutrition (i.e. non-species appropriate food, non-fresh food, etc.).

    I sound like a broken record, but consider a gradual change to a real food, grain-free, low-carb. diet whether it be cooked or raw food. Add digestive enzymes to meals and use a probiotic for several months.

    Damage control/breaking the habit in the short term: Only let the dogs out to eliminate when you are there to supervise. Pick up all feces immediately. If you see the dog start to think about eating a pile, give a “no” command and re-direct their attention so you can pick up the poop. Treat it as a training task much as you would teach “sit” or “stay.”

    Hope that helps! By the way, I’m a holistic veterinarian in Phoenix and I have a blog at http://naturalalternativesvet.com/category/blog

    #38412

    Austin L
    Member

    I’ve been a long time reader but thought I’d see if I could get some advice from the knowledgeable people on this board. Our 11 month old hound/boxer mix has recently (past 1-2 months) started eating poop. At first we didn’t even notice as he’d do it when running around on his own in the backyard. But then he had a few bouts of day long vomiting after we caught him doing it. When we keep him away from the poop it’s fine and he doesn’t have vomiting problems. We’ll have my fiance’s parents dog-sit him sometimes when we’re out of town and he’s gotten into poop there as well followed by vomiting. As soon as he vomits we limit him to chicken with yogurt and rice to help calm his stomach for the next few days.

    He’s a VORACIOUS eater and as soon as he finishes eating he’s searching for more food. He’s 60 lbs and we feed him 4 cups a day (feeding twice daily) of high quality grain free food. We’ve rotated between Wellness Core Wild Game, Orijen Adult, Wellness Core Original, and Merrick Duck and Sweet Potato. We feed him in a bowl designed to help slow him down as well. We also just finished a regimen of probiotics that we purchased about 2-3 months ago to help with loose stools, which worked wonders.

    What I’m wondering is if we need to possibly switch him to a food with grain in it. He never ever seems full and will run out and eat poop right after he finished his meal if he’s allowed. Also, should we try a digestive enzyme as well? Any suggestions would be great we just want to find something that we can stick with to help him. Thanks!

    EDIT: Also I forgot to mention he’s always had issues with fairly constant anal gland secretions. Nothing huge, just little bit every couple of days.

    • This topic was modified 5 years, 7 months ago by  Austin L.
    #23636

    theBCnut
    Member

    Mine like the little tiny wild bunny poop the best.

    #23633

    Hound Dog Mom
    Participant

    The only poop my dogs have ever gone after is horse poop. I don’t know why but as soon as they see a horse turd they think it’s a free for all buffet. They’ve never shown any interest in eating other dog’s poop or the cat’s poop.

    #23630

    theBCnut
    Member

    My dedicated poop eater quit cold turkey when I switched to high protein grain free. He still wants to eat the poop of the dog we babysit that is on cheaper food and I don’t know if there is anything that would make kitty fudge unattractive.

    #23626

    Jackie B
    Member

    Try Solid Gold’s SEP product, maybe that will help. One of my forum friends said it works on her dogs. Or pick up quickly after her, if you can. Not that it will help with cat poo.

    #22986

    Hound Dog Mom
    Participant

    I would not feed a hydrolyzed low protein diet. A diet such as that should only be used under extreme medical conditions. They are prescription only and any vet in their right mind would never prescribe it for a dog with coprophagia. Dogs are meant to eat a diet high in animal-based protein, pleas don’t force make your dog eat a food like that. Most of the time coprophagia is not a nutritional issue – it’s a behavioral issue.

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 3 months ago by  Hound Dog Mom.
    #22980

    bellesmom
    Participant

    Belle is driving me nuts. She strains to get to cat poo when we’re walking and even tries to eat her own poop. I’ve used the additives and tried the recommended foods: pumpkin, pineapple, spinach. Nothing works. I just read a recommendation for a hydrolyzed diet that is lower in protein. Any suggestions for food brands for this type diet. She is a Maltese/Scottish Terrier mix and weighs 20 lbs. I currently feed her Blue Lamb and Brown Rice. Any feedback would be appreciated.

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