Search Results for 'atopic dermatitis'

Dog Food Advisor Forums Search Search Results for 'atopic dermatitis'

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  • #146013

    In reply to: Itchy doggo??

    anonymous
    Member

    Itchy Shih Tzu has allergies
    By Dr. John De Jong | Ask the Vet
    September 8, 2019 at 12:43 am

    My 7-year-old Shih Tzu has just started itching a lot more so I took her to the vet. The itching just started a few weeks ago, seemed to come and go, and got worse recently.
    My friend’s dog also started itching a lot and her vet gave the dog an injection that seemed to work and the dog got better. She also mentioned that there was an anti-itch pill available so I mentioned both. My vet gave me Apoquel pills and the dog is already improved so I’m grateful but I was also told that there is a distinct possibility that this itchiness was due to a seasonal allergy and that I could likely expect it every year from now on. Is that true?
    The more I thought about it, I realized that my dog always seemed itchy in late August in the past few years. Is there any testing that could have given me a heads up and what can I do to prevent a recurrence next year?

    It sounds as if your dog has a seasonal allergy that we refer to as atopy or atopic dermatitis.
    These signs can appear at almost any time after the dog reaches about a year although occasionally it is seen earlier and indeed, it seems to get more problematic with each passing year. Caused often by pollens and airborne matter, it triggers a group of signs including pruritis or itchiness, oily skin, secondary focal infections, hair loss, changes in skin and hair color, and crusts.
    These findings can occur in the ears, ventral abdomen and along the legs, often causing dogs to lick and chew at their feet and inside legs.One does need to rule out other causes, such as ectoparasites like fleas and mange mites, but the seasonality is often a dead giveaway.
    Previous or current testing can be done to determine what your dog is allergic to and then allergy shots can be done to desensitize the dog. Speak with your veterinarian about these options as well as the possibility of using appropriate shampoos as the season approaches. Likely your friend’s dog was given an injection of Cytopoint, however Apoquel works very well and seems to be doing the trick. Both of these work for limited periods but are safe and can be used as needed to control the itch and keep the patient comfortable.
    Often, breaking the itch cycle for a while resolves the problem along with the change of season and weather. Be ready for more of the same and slightly increased intensity next year.
    https://www.bostonherald.com/2019/09/08/itchy-shih-tzu-has-allergies/

    #145998
    anonymous
    Member

    Yes, rabies vaccine every 3 years after initial rabies shot plus booster and puppy shots till the dog is about 1 year old, that’s what many of us do..

    Here is the problem, pet owners that use the services of a dog kennel, groomer, dog sitter, travel by plane, train, go to dog parks, doggy daycare are required to show proof of multiple vaccinations being up to date including kennel cough.

    Many apartment complexes and low income housing allow a pet or two, but they must show proof of not just the rabies vaccine but many of the other vaccines.

    Titers are usually not accepted. You may be able to get a medical waiver regarding your pet not getting the rabies vaccine but these are very hard to obtain, often the pet has to be terminally ill, geriatric or have a medical condition such as seizures/neurological.
    I finally obtained a rabies vaccine waiver for my dog with atopic dermatitis after almost a decade of asking.
    So it is worth a discussion with your vet if you have concerns.
    However, all of the above businesses/housing have the right not to accept the waiver or titers in lieu of vaccinations.

    PS: Mercola is a homeopathic practitioner. https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/kibble-way-down-on-list-of-appropriate-diet/#post-143727

    #143872
    anonymous
    Member

    I knew it (carpeting)! If the dog has a flea allergy, you may not see any signs of fleas. Again one flea bite can wreak havoc.
    Work closely with your vet, however…
    If the dog’s symptoms continue, please consider consulting a veterinary dermatologist, that was the only thing that helped my dog. Intradermal allergy testing
    https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/canine-atopic-dermatitis-environmental-allergies-in-dogs
    Final words about atopic dermatitis in dogs
    “It is also very important for any dog with atopic dermatitis to be on a year-round, comprehensive flea control program. Atopic dogs tend to be more sensitive to the bites of fleas, so even occasional fleabites should be prevented. Speak with your veterinarian about a safe and effective flea prevention program for all the pets in your home, and learn more about fleas here”.

    “Managing this lifelong condition takes some patience. By using various combinations of therapy, and altering the treatment when needed, your veterinarian can help your atopic dog feel and look their best. And for cases that prove difficult to manage, there are board-certified veterinary dermatology specialists that are available to help. You can search for a specialist in your area on the website for the American College of Veterinary Dermatology”.

    The only accurate way to do a food elimination trial is with prescription/therapeutic diet food.

    Otherwise, it’s a waste of time.

    #143507

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems

    anonymous
    Member

    Yeah, tried all that.

    The only thing that helped was having the anal glands expressed at least once a week by a vet tech.
    You can ask your vet to have the vet tech show you how to do it yourself.

    My dog with environmental allergies had anal gland issues, once she started treatment for atopic dermatitis by a veterinary dermatologist all anal gland issues went away.

    She does well on a variety of foods. The dog food did not appear to have anything to do with it.

    PS: GSDs have specific anal gland problems related to the breed.

    anonymous
    Member

    If you click on the link you will see hundreds of comments I have posted on the subject.
    It would take several hours to repeat the information you will find there.
    There is a search engine here for that reason.

    Better yet, make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist asap to get your dog properly diagnosed and treated. There is no veterinary healthcare professional at this site. Even if there were they have not examined your dog nor can they provide specific advice regarding your pet. Best of luck!

    Example “The diet helps but it can only do so much.
    A multifaceted approach is often needed for environmental allergies. There is no cure.
    But there are effective treatments/management.
    PS: Bacterial skin infections that require antibiotics are common with atopic dermatitis. It is painful. Itchiness and burning….
    Next, ear infections.”

    example: “Please visit a board certified veterinarian asap for testing/diagnosis/treatment.
    It’s been a year/4 seasons without significant results by the regular vet.
    Do not give over the counter meds/supplements or apply ointments, creams that are not intended for veterinary use unless advised to do so by a veterinarian that has examined your dog”.

    Example: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/hes-got-good-and-environmental-allergies/#post-113364
    “Make an appointment with a board certified veterinary dermatologist. It’s not the food. Just my opinion, based on my experience and knowledge”.

    Very good information here: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=environmental+allergies

    Cody D
    Member

    So back from the vet for my dog. They thought demodectic mange like I did. BUT it isn’t. No excess in mites on his skin. Which means a type of allergy, so you’re likely right anon and it’s atopic dermatitis. Good news is I didn’t even have to ask they gave me apoquel. Pricey from them though so I’ll have to try chewy or something. How long before you saw the apoquel starting to work? And any other advice for dealing with this? We’re gunna stay on his special diet for another month and a half to see if that still maybe helps, and if not try one other or go to a dermatologist-vet. Ad for the topic of this thread, my husky Zeus, got his new hypoallergenic food today too. Now just slowly switch him over and hope that just this allows alot of improvement. Wait and see game now. My least favorite activity.

    anonymous
    Member

    Well, it certainly sounds like atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) or some other skin condition. It sounds like the dog is in extreme discomfort and at risk for bacterial skin infection.

    Anything anyone tells you on these forums is just speculation and opinion (myself included)

    If your veterinarian has not been helpful I would ask for a referral to a veterinary dermatologist for testing to come up with an accurate diagnosis and treatment options.

    There is no miracle cure or magical supplement or food that will fix this.

    In fact the dog may have to go on steroids and antibiotics again to temporarily stop the suffering.
    Consult your vet, asap.

    Cody D
    Member

    I know this is getting off topic here but I’m doubting atopic dermatitis in my other dog. Unless he somehow doesn’t have the traditional clinical signs and it is manifesting in other ways (heck I guess that’s what happened to my Husky boy according to the vet!). I just checked him over and his scabs are spreading for sure though. Two on one leg, one on another. Multiple on his lower back where they started, and they’ve moved to the base of his tail. hum…. When it rains it pours…. Hairloss all areas except a few, and I expect that to follow soon. When inspecting one on his lower leg (almost his foot) yesterday I realized tuffs of fur just come off with the scab. It’s not quite bald in the spot, but close too. He’s a malamute cross so the scabs can be hard to find through all that fur until we see the bald spots or him attacking it. Ugh.

    anonymous
    Member

    The diet helps but it can only do so much.

    A multifaceted approach is often needed for environmental allergies. There is no cure.

    But there are effective treatments/management.

    PS: Bacterial skin infections that require antibiotics are common with atopic dermatitis. It is painful. Itchiness and burning….

    Next, ear infections.

    anonymous
    Member

    But what did the specialist suggest it is? Surely she must have an idea, what did she advise to do next? Besides the scope.

    I have been through it, it’s a nightmare.
    I never had a dog scoped though, usually they have a diagnosis after labs and x-ray.

    I currently have an a dog with atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) there is no cure, just management ($$) and even with the best of treatment they can have flareups. She’s on antibiotics currently for a bacterial skin infection and we are trying Apoquel. Immunotherapy worked for years till now…

    I sure hope your dog feels better soon. And you and your wife too.

    #131652

    In reply to: Anxiety Scratching

    anonymous
    Member

    Yes, make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist and get the dog diagnosed.

    Pruritus is not a typical response to anxiety. Your vet is correct.

    She probably has atopic dermatitis/environmental allergies. There is no cure, allergies wax and wane. There is effective treatment but it will cost a few bucks.

    Environmental allergies tend to show up between ages 1 to 3 and get worse with age.
    Maybe that was why she was given up/abandoned.

    Don’t keep changing the food and trying all kinds of bogus remedies, it won’t work.

    Please see my posts, you may find something helpful.
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/atopic+dermatitis/

    Take the dog out for bathroom breaks every 2 hours and first thing in the morning and the last thing before bedtime. Try to be patient, it sounds like this dog has been through a lot.
    When her skin condition is properly diagnosed and treated you may notice a much more relaxed and comfortable dog.

    Regarding the separation anxiety you may want to talk to your vet about medication, as the dog continues to stabilize after a few months to a year she can be tapered off. It doesn’t have to be forever.

    #131619

    In reply to: yeast infection

    anonymous
    Member

    Yeast infections are often a symptom of atopic dermatitis. In other words it may have absolutely nothing to do with his diet.
    Ask your vet for a referral to a veterinary dermatologist for testing and an accurate diagnosis.
    Your regular vet has no choice but to treat the symptoms and hope that they will go away for a while. It is very important to prevent infection, only antibiotics and other medications can do that once the skin condition is out of control.

    You seem to ask the same questions over and over again, maybe you are expecting different answers? No one here has examined your dog?

    Anyway, you can review my previous responses, I hope that you will find something helpful.
    Good luck

    #125285

    In reply to: Malaseb

    anonymous
    Member

    “Last time it was out of stock on chewy.com I bought Dechra MichonaHex+ Triz which is very similar and works just as well. Just smells worse IMO”.

    @ Pitlove
    Thanks
    Yes, something is going on with Bayer Malaseb.
    Dermcare is not the same thing, even the label is different.

    For now I have ordered Dechra Mal-A-Ket Shampoo. I alternate with a gentle puppy shampoo in conjunction with other treatments including allergen specific immunotherapy as directed by the veterinary dermatologist that has been treating my dog for several years.

    As you know, atopic dermatitis requires a multipronged approach for best results.

    PS: Some previous posts where I have mentioned Malaseb: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/rescue-possible-food-allergy/#post-109393
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/rescue-possible-food-allergy/#post-109394

    #113432
    anonymous
    Member

    For the best results, make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist.
    Here is a good article about what you might be looking at, keep in mind there are even newer treatment options than when this article was written
    http://www.nevetdermatology.com/canine-atopic-dermatitis-treatment/
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/allergies-and-itchy-dogs/
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies

    #113364
    anonymous
    Member

    Please visit a board certified veterinarian asap for testing/diagnosis/treatment.

    It’s been a year/4 seasons without significant results by the regular vet.

    Do not give over the counter meds/supplements or apply ointments, creams that are not intended for veterinary use unless advised to do so by a veterinarian that has examined your dog.
    See my posts:
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/atopic+dermatitis/

    Intradermal skin testing done by a veterinary dermatologist.
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/
    Good luck
    PS: The initial testing can run about $800. the solution for allergen specific immunotherapy can run about $200 or more maybe 3 times a year. We just see the dermatologist once a year for a checkup. Otherwise he is available by phone and will talk to the regular vet if need be.
    The treatment is lifelong, but it is natural, similar to the allergy shots people get to desensitize. No prednisone. Don’t get me wrong, it can take up to a year to kick in, but we saw results right away. They can still have flare-ups but they tend to be mild.

    #113089
    anonymous
    Member

    Okay, so the blood test.

    Intradermal skin testing done by a veterinary dermatologist is the most accurate way to test for environmental allergies.

    I suspect the test you had done detects sensitivities and not true allergies.
    Check with your vet.

    Per the search engine: http://www.nevetdermatology.com/canine-atopic-dermatitis-treatment/
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/allergies-and-itchy-dogs/
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies

    #111744

    In reply to: Pea free food

    anonymous
    Member

    I skipped the blood test, the veterinary dermatologist told me after examination that her allergies appeared to be environmental. I had the intradermal skin test done and started asit (allergen specific immunotherapy). The test i’s not cheap but it’s the most accurate way to identify allergens.
    Asit is the most natural way to treat environmental allergies, the treatment is lifelong.
    My dog has been stable over 5 years. She eats a variety of different foods, but does best with Zignature
    whitefish kibble as a base.
    Frequent bathing with a vet recommended shampoo helps too.
    There is no cure for environmental allergies but there is effective treatment.
    Food allergies are rare, food sensitivities tend to fluctuate.
    Environmental allergies tend to wax and wane.
    Apoquel is prescribed for environmental allergies.
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/poop-less-and-scratching/#post-111715
    http://www.nevetdermatology.com/canine-atopic-dermatitis-treatment/ There are even newer treatment options since this article was written.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies

    #111715
    anonymous
    Member

    You could try a different food, however it sounds like it could be environmental allergies. Hopefully, if it is, they are mild and/or seasonal.
    I would consult your vet, you don’t want him to scratch till he gets infections.
    He may suggest a prescription/therapeutic diet to rule out food sensitivities, also, ask your vet about adding fish oil to combat skin dryness.
    If it continues for 4 seasons/1 year without significant periods of relief despite treatment by the regular vet. Or the symptoms become worse and the dog is suffering, I would find a board certified veterinary dermatologist for accurate testing/diagnosis and treatment.
    That would be your best bet.
    Your vet should be able to refer you.
    Hope these articles help
    Keep in mind there are even newer treatment options than when this article was written
    http://www.nevetdermatology.com/canine-atopic-dermatitis-treatment/

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/allergies-and-itchy-dogs/

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies

    #111660

    In reply to: Itchy ears

    anonymous
    Member

    Zignature and Nutrisca have no potato, has your vet suggested a prescription/therapeutic diet? That would be the only accurate way to rule out food sensitivities.
    Keep in mind your dog may have environmental allergies which tend to wax and wane, they may be mild, seasonal or uncomfortable enough that the expertise of a specialist may be needed.
    See my prior posts per the search engine
    examples:
    How long has this been going on? Because I have a dog with environmental allergies, I had good results, but, only after going to a veterinary dermatologist.
    I thought it was the food too, tried all kinds of things with poor results, my dog is doing well now on ASIT allergen specific immunotherapy times 5 years.
    Turns out she can eat most foods but does best on Zignature whitefish (before that Nutrisca salmon) as a base.
    So, I would consider going to a specialist if her symptoms go on for more than a year (4 seasons) without significant relief.
    Food allergies are rare, environmental allergies are usually the culprit.

    and
    For the best results, make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist.
    Here is a good article about what you might be looking at, keep in mind there are even newer treatment options than when this article was written
    http://www.nevetdermatology.com/canine-atopic-dermatitis-treatment/
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/allergies-and-itchy-dogs/
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies

    #111451
    anonymous
    Member

    “It might just be that he is sensitive to them and it’s not a full blown allergy”

    That is an allergy! Only an intradermal skin test performed by a veterinary dermatologist can determine how sensitive your dog is to the allergens and what if any treatment is recommended.

    Here is a good article, keep in mind there are even newer treatments available since the article was written
    http://www.nevetdermatology.com/canine-atopic-dermatitis-treatment/

    #111203
    anonymous
    Member

    For the best results, make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist.

    Here is a good article about what you might be looking at, keep in mind there are even newer treatment options than when this article was written
    http://www.nevetdermatology.com/canine-atopic-dermatitis-treatment/

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/allergies-and-itchy-dogs/

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies

    #110255
    anonymous
    Member

    You are assuming that the symptoms are behavioral.

    More than likely you are dealing with a skin condition known as atopic dermatitis.

    Extremely uncomfortable for the dog and requires the expertise of a veterinarian, a veterinary dermatologist for the best results.

    Testing, diagnosis and treatment.

    #110059

    In reply to: Need advice on food!

    anonymous
    Member

    For best results I would make an appointment with a board certified veterinary dermatologist for accurate testing, diagnosis and treatment.

    Environmental allergies? Has mange been ruled out? Atopic dermatitis? Medical condition? Has lab work and skin testing been done?
    Treatment is often a multifaceted approach. It’s not just about finding the right food, or the right shampoo, or the right supplement.
    In fact the food may have nothing to do with his symptoms.

    Do you have pet health insurance? You may want to consider getting it before he is officially diagnosed. Treatment can be a little expensive.
    If it is environmental allergies, there is no cure. There is effective treatment, however it is lifelong, allergies tend to wax and wane so you may get lucky, they could be mild or seasonal (if that’s what he has). He could very well have some other skin disorder or medical condition that is causing these issues.

    Bathing with a very gentle puppy shampoo at least once a week may help, but not if the skin is red, bleeding or irritated, in that case I would defer to the vet.
    Talk to your vet, if you want to rule out food sensitivities ask about a prescription/therapeutic diet, that might be a good place to start, it depends on how severe his symptoms are and how uncomfortable the dog is.

    I would go directly to the specialist if it was my dog, my dog sees a veterinary dermatologist once a year and has had a positive response to treatment.
    She did well on Nutrisca salmon for years but is now on Zignature whitefish or catfish.
    You could add fish oil (approved for veterinary use) once a day to his food, it’s supposed to help with dry skin. I add a little water and a topper, like a bit of scrambled egg (2 meals per day)

    #109394
    anonymous
    Member

    Some allergens are airborne, like I said, impossible to avoid.
    In the summer these allergy dogs do best in air conditioning.
    At one point I had an air purifier and a dehumidifier going (all went to the Goodwill), even tried raw food (disgusting and caused an emergency vet visit) absolutely nothing worked till she saw the dermatologist.
    I also had countless shampoos and creams going on, all a waste of money.
    The Malaseb did nothing until it was used in conjunction with other treatments prescribed by the specialist.
    Allergies are very complicated and every dog is different.

    Here is a good article about what you might be looking at, keep in mind there are even newer treatment options than when this article was written
    http://www.nevetdermatology.com/canine-atopic-dermatitis-treatment/

    #103756
    anonymous
    Member

    Obviously your dog may have environmental allergies. Intradermal skin testing is the only accurate way to identify the allergens. I can’t believe your veterinary dermatologist hasn’t recommended this?
    Then you can identify the treatment options. Allergen specific immunotherapy (desensitization) subq or shots is the most natural treatment.
    There is no cure. Atopic dermatitis is a serious condition and requires lifelong treatment. It has nothing to do with the food.
    The skin discoloration you describe is hyperpigmentation, common in dogs with environmental allergies.

    There is no cheap way out of this, testing will run. close to $1000, maintenance will run a few hundred a year.
    There are no miracle cures for this condition.
    Use the search engine to see my posts, https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/
    Good luck

    #102306
    anonymous
    Member

    This topic comes up so frequently that I thought I would post this article from LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital, it stresses the importance of an accurate diagnosis being the first step in treatment.
    “This is the reason that we encourage diagnosis of the underlying cause of the allergy and more specific or less potentially harmful treatments”.

    Introduction
    Coping with an itchy pet can be an extremely frustrating experience for you, the pet owner and can truly test the limits of the human-animal bond.  Persistent scratching and chewing by the pet can also result in self-excoriation and open wounds.  The following information is intended to provide the pet owner with a basic understanding of the most common underlying causes of itching and allergies in the small animal.
     
    The Most Common Causes of Chronic Itching
    The common causes fall into two groups: external parasites and allergies.  External parasites that most commonly cause chronic itching dermatitis include fleas and sarcoptic mange.  We often recommend therapeutic trials for sarcoptic mange in chronically and severely itchy dogs.  We always recommend stepped-up flea control and monitoring for fleas, as flea infestation can really make allergy worse!
     
    What are allergies?
    Allergy is a state of hypersensitivity in which exposure to a harmless substance known as an allergen induces the body’s immune system to “overreact”.  The incidence of allergies is increasing in both humans and their pets.  People with allergies usually have “Hay Fever” ( watery eyes, runny nose and sneezing) or asthma. While dogs can rarely also have respiratory allergies, more commonly they experience the effects of allergic hypersensitivities as skin problems.  Though there are a variety of presentations, this can often be seen as redness and itching, recurring skin or ear infections, and hair loss.  This is sometimes called ‘eczema’ or atopic dermatitis.  

    What are the Major Types of Allergies in Dogs?
    Flea Allergy
    Flea allergic dermatitis is the most common skin disease in dogs and cats.  For the flea allergic patient, 100% flea control is essential for the pet to remain symptom-free.  “But doctor, I never see fleas on my pet.”
     
    You may not see them, but that does not mean they are not there.  The allergy is caused by the flea’s saliva, and it only takes a few bites to induce the problem.  Also, the itchy pet often scratches so much that adult fleas are removed, making them hard to find.  “If fleas are the problem, why is my pet still itchy in the winter.” – In warm climates like we have Louisiana, fleas may survive in low numbers year-round.  Because flea allergy is so common, we recommend that complete flea control be instituted before proceeding with diagnostics for other allergies and that year-round flea control be maintained for all allergy patients.

    Food Allergy
    Some pets develop specific hypersensitivities to components of their diets.  The allergen usually is a major protein or carbohydrate ingredient such as beef, chicken, pork, corn, wheat, or soy.  Minor ingredients such as preservatives or dyes are also potential allergens.  The diagnosis of food allergy requires that we test your pet by feeding special strict diets that contain only ingredients that he has never eaten before. This is often achieved by feeding a prescription diet for a period of 10 – 16 weeks.  If the signs resolve, a challenge is performed by feeding the former diet and watching for a return of the itching.  If this occurs, a diagnosis of food allergy is confirmed.  

    Atopic Dermatitis
    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inherited predisposition to develop skin problems from exposure to variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances including the pollens of weeds, grasses and trees, as well as house dust mites and mold spores.  Diagnosis of AD is made based on the results of intradermal skin testing or by in vitro blood testing.  Skin testing is the preferred method; small injections of many different allergens are made in the skin on the pet’s side, under light sedation.  Observation of the reactions helps us compile a list of allergens for a “vaccine” that is made to decrease the pet’s sensitivity.  Sometimes multiple skin and/or blood tests are necessary to accurately assess the patient’s allergies.

    Secondary Infections
    Allergies are often the underlying cause of recurring skin and/or ear.  Bacterial and yeast infections, though secondary to the allergy, can cause an increase in your pet’s level of itching. Long term treatment with antibiotics and anti-yeast medications is commonly required, along with medicated bathing programs.

    Can allergies be cured?
    Unfortunately, there is no cure for allergy and it is usually a life-long problem. We seek to control allergy and improve the quality of life for both you and your pet.  We will formulate the best program of management that suits all involved with your pet’s care.  

    Can I have the itching treated without the expense of diagnostic testing?
    Symptomatic drug therapy can help to reduce itching.  Steroids, such as prednisone tablets, in particular, are often employed to stop the itch.  However, without addressing the underlying cause, the itching will return.  Long term use of steroids can result in many health problems.  This is the reason that we encourage diagnosis of the underlying cause of the allergy and more specific or less potentially harmful treatments.
    – See more at: http://www.lsu.edu/vetmed/veterinary_hospital/services/dermatology/patient_information/allergies_in_dogs.php#sthash.tAEI8WbV.dpuf

    #102218
    anonymous
    Member

    You may find this article helpful, it describes the various treatments, written by a veterinary dermatologist.
    http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/it-s-not-magic-skinny-treating-canine-atopic-dermatitis

    Another option, ask your vet about an elimination diet/prescription food.

    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #102217
    anonymous
    Member

    Pruritus can be very uncomfortable, untreated it can lead to skin infections, ear infections and malaise and sometimes even aggressive behavior.
    This subject comes up at least twice a week. Rather than treat the symptoms and change the diet multiple ways. The first step would be to get h1s condition diagnosed by a veterinarian. Atopic dermatitis is often caused by environmental allergies, not the food.
    Food sensitivities fluctuate and tend to result in gastrointestinal disturbances rather than pruritus. Food allergies are rare.
    Environmental allergies tend to wax and wane, they may be mild and may be treated with prescribed meds such as Apoquel certain times of the year or severe and need year round treatment such as allergen specific immunotherapy (desensitization) which is now available sublingual (by mouth).
    I got the best results after going to a veterinary dermatologist. I spent a year going back and forth to the regular vet and didn’t get any answers. Although, they did offer temporary comfort measures. Allergies are complicated, they don’t go away, there is no cure.
    However there is effective treatment.

    Here is my response to a similar question:
    “Have environmental allergies been ruled out? What you describe sounds like that’s what your dog may have vs food sensitivities”.
    “They usually start around 1-2 years old and get worse with age. Environmental allergies tend to wax and wane making it almost impossible to tell which foods work or not”.
    “Everyone blames the food, but I have found my dog tolerates a lot of different foods since beginning allergen specific immunotherapy (desensitization). The treatment tends to be lifelong, but no more ear infections, rashes, anal gland issues (5 years in)”
    “The initial testing, intra dermal skin testing is expensive, maintenance isn’t that bad.
    For best results, an accurate diagnosis and treatment options that work, I would make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist. Allergies are complicated and often require the expertise of a specialist.”
    And another:
    “When you call for the appointment with the veterinary dermatologist, the office will explain how to prepare the dog for testing, depending on the results of the exam, the specialist may recommend intra dermal skin testing to identify environmental allergies. The expertise of the specialist in interpreting the results is crucial to the treatment he will recommend.
    He may want to do a blood test, in my dog’s case we skipped it as he determined the symptoms to be clearly environmental.”
    “We were in and out in about an hour with a list of allergies and a course of treatment to begin”.
    “Allergen specific immunotherapy, 5 years in and my dog is doing very well, we see the dermatologist once a year”.
    “Now, if your dogs allergies are mild/seasonal he may suggest medication certain times of the year instead”.
    “Forget about hair and saliva tests they are scams (imo)”
    “Ps: Let us know how it goes, I was very pleased with how smoothly the testing went.
    They say it may take a while to see results, but I saw improvement right away”

    If you click on my avatar and scan “replies created” you will find a multitude of comments I have provided related to allergies.
    Ps: I can’t stress this enough. I would not apply anything to the rash, no over the counter meds, creams (nothing) unless recommended by a veterinarian that has examined the dog. Also, too much bathing may make the rash worse.
    You can’t treat a condition until you know what it is 🙂

    I agree with pitluv, if Iams works, stick with it. Maybe the fish doesn’t agree with him?

    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #101839
    anonymous
    Member

    You may find this article helpful, it describes the various treatments, written by a veterinary dermatologist.

    http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/it-s-not-magic-skinny-treating-canine-atopic-dermatitis

    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #94718
    anonymous
    Member

    And:

    I would encourage you to make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist. It may be seasonal, it may be mild, or not. Only testing by a specialist can give you answers and a treatment plan. Saliva and hair mail-in tests are not allergy tests.
    Per the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    “Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment”.

    “There are two types of allergy tests, the intradermal allergy test and blood testing for allergies (serologic allergy testing). In an intradermal allergy test, the fur is clipped on one side of the chest and very small amounts of common allergens are injected into the skin. This test is very precise and is only performed by Veterinary Dermatology services. Because most pets with environmental allergies become exposed to their allergens through their skin, the intradermal allergy test may also best simulate a pet’s natural allergies. In a blood allergy test, a blood sample is obtained and submitted to a laboratory for testing”.

    “If a pet is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, there are three methods of therapy. The first method of therapy involves removing the allergen from the pet’s environment”. “Unfortunately, this is not possible in most cases. The second method of therapy involves the use of anti-itch drugs such as anti-histamines or steroids (cortisone). Some of these anti-itch medications do not work in every pet. Other pets develop side-effects from taking certain anti-itch medications”.

    “The third method of therapy for atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) is allergy injections. Other names for allergy injections include desensitization, hyposensitization, allergy vaccine, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immunotherapy involves a series of injections of diluted allergens. Over time, these injections make a pet less sensitive to their allergens and thus less allergic. Most pet owners are able to learn how to give the injections at home. When based on the results of intradermal allergy testing, immunotherapy helps manage the allergies in approximately 70-90% of pets. Most pets will respond to immunotherapy within 6-9 months, but some pets will require up to a year of immunotherapy injections before a full benefit can be noted”.

    http://www.mspca.org/vet-services/angell-boston/dermatology/boston-dematology-allergies.html

    #94455

    In reply to: Pinpointing allergies?

    anonymous
    Member

    I would encourage you to make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist. It may be seasonal, it may be mild, or not. Only testing by a specialist can give you answers and a treatment plan.

    Per the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    Saliva and hair mail-in tests are not allergy tests.
    “Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment”.
    “There are two types of allergy tests, the intradermal allergy test and blood testing for allergies (serologic allergy testing). In an intradermal allergy test, the fur is clipped on one side of the chest and very small amounts of common allergens are injected into the skin. This test is very precise and is only performed by Veterinary Dermatology services. Because most pets with environmental allergies become exposed to their allergens through their skin, the intradermal allergy test may also best simulate a pet’s natural allergies. In a blood allergy test, a blood sample is obtained and submitted to a laboratory for testing”.
    “If a pet is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, there are three methods of therapy. The first method of therapy involves removing the allergen from the pet’s environment”. “Unfortunately, this is not possible in most cases. The second method of therapy involves the use of anti-itch drugs such as anti-histamines or steroids (cortisone). Some of these anti-itch medications do not work in every pet. Other pets develop side-effects from taking certain anti-itch medications”.
    “The third method of therapy for atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) is allergy injections. Other names for allergy injections include desensitization, hyposensitization, allergy vaccine, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immunotherapy involves a series of injections of diluted allergens. Over time, these injections make a pet less sensitive to their allergens and thus less allergic. Most pet owners are able to learn how to give the injections at home. When based on the results of intradermal allergy testing, immunotherapy helps manage the allergies in approximately 70-90% of pets. Most pets will respond to immunotherapy within 6-9 months, but some pets will require up to a year of immunotherapy injections before a full benefit can be noted”.
    http://www.mspca.org/vet-services/angell-boston/dermatology/boston-dematology-allergies.html

    #93346
    anonymous
    Member

    Have you made an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist? That’s where would start. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only thing that worked for my dog with environmental allergies.
    Dust mite allergies and such are environmental, airborne and present year round, shed from the skin of all living things, including you.
    Have you checked the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    “Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment”.
    “There are two types of allergy tests, the intradermal allergy test and blood testing for allergies (serologic allergy testing). In an intradermal allergy test, the fur is clipped on one side of the chest and very small amounts of common allergens are injected into the skin. This test is very precise and is only performed by Veterinary Dermatology services. Because most pets with environmental allergies become exposed to their allergens through their skin, the intradermal allergy test may also best simulate a pet’s natural allergies. In a blood allergy test, a blood sample is obtained and submitted to a laboratory for testing”.
    “If a pet is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, there are three methods of therapy. The first method of therapy involves removing the allergen from the pet’s environment”. “Unfortunately, this is not possible in most cases. The second method of therapy involves the use of anti-itch drugs such as anti-histamines or steroids (cortisone). Some of these anti-itch medications do not work in every pet. Other pets develop side-effects from taking certain anti-itch medications”.
    “The third method of therapy for atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) is allergy injections. Other names for allergy injections include desensitization, hyposensitization, allergy vaccine, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immunotherapy involves a series of injections of diluted allergens. Over time, these injections make a pet less sensitive to their allergens and thus less allergic. Most pet owners are able to learn how to give the injections at home. When based on the results of intradermal allergy testing, immunotherapy helps manage the allergies in approximately 70-90% of pets. Most pets will respond to immunotherapy within 6-9 months, but some pets will require up to a year of immunotherapy injections before a full benefit can be noted”.
    http://www.mspca.org/vet-services/angell-boston/dermatology/boston-dematology-allergies.html

    #93279

    In reply to: Dog Food Intolerant

    anonymous
    Member

    Saliva and hair mail-in tests are not allergy tests.

    “Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment”.
    “There are two types of allergy tests, the intradermal allergy test and blood testing for allergies (serologic allergy testing). In an intradermal allergy test, the fur is clipped on one side of the chest and very small amounts of common allergens are injected into the skin. This test is very precise and is only performed by Veterinary Dermatology services. Because most pets with environmental allergies become exposed to their allergens through their skin, the intradermal allergy test may also best simulate a pet’s natural allergies. In a blood allergy test, a blood sample is obtained and submitted to a laboratory for testing”.
    “If a pet is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, there are three methods of therapy. The first method of therapy involves removing the allergen from the pet’s environment”. “Unfortunately, this is not possible in most cases. The second method of therapy involves the use of anti-itch drugs such as anti-histamines or steroids (cortisone). Some of these anti-itch medications do not work in every pet. Other pets develop side-effects from taking certain anti-itch medications”.
    “The third method of therapy for atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) is allergy injections. Other names for allergy injections include desensitization, hyposensitization, allergy vaccine, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immunotherapy involves a series of injections of diluted allergens. Over time, these injections make a pet less sensitive to their allergens and thus less allergic. Most pet owners are able to learn how to give the injections at home. When based on the results of intradermal allergy testing, immunotherapy helps manage the allergies in approximately 70-90% of pets. Most pets will respond to immunotherapy within 6-9 months, but some pets will require up to a year of immunotherapy injections before a full benefit can be noted”.
    http://www.mspca.org/vet-services/angell-boston/dermatology/boston-dematology-allergies.html

    #89407
    anonymously
    Member

    Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment.

    There are two types of allergy tests, the intradermal allergy test and blood testing for allergies (serologic allergy testing). In an intradermal allergy test, the fur is clipped on one side of the chest and very small amounts of common allergens are injected into the skin. This test is very precise and is only performed by Veterinary Dermatology services. Because most pets with environmental allergies become exposed to their allergens through their skin, the intradermal allergy test may also best simulate a pet’s natural allergies. In a blood allergy test, a blood sample is obtained and submitted to a laboratory for testing.

    If a pet is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, there are three methods of therapy. The first method of therapy involves removing the allergen from the pet’s environment. Unfortunately, this is not possible in most cases. The second method of therapy involves the use of anti-itch drugs such as anti-histamines or steroids (cortisone). Some of these anti-itch medications do not work in every pet. Other pets develop side-effects from taking certain anti-itch medications.

    The third method of therapy for atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) is allergy injections. Other names for allergy injections include desensitization, hyposensitization, allergy vaccine, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immunotherapy involves a series of injections of diluted allergens. Over time, these injections make a pet less sensitive to their allergens and thus less allergic. Most pet owners are able to learn how to give the injections at home. When based on the results of intradermal allergy testing, immunotherapy helps manage the allergies in approximately 70-90% of pets. Most pets will respond to immunotherapy within 6-9 months, but some pets will require up to a year of immunotherapy injections before a full benefit can be noted.

    Allergy Diagnosis and Management
    Allergies are a common cause of skin and ear conditions in pets. Dogs and cats with allergies may scratch, chew, lick their paws, rub their face or have recurrent ear infections.

    Three types of allergies are common in dogs and cats: food allergies, flea allergy dermatitis and atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies). We offer:
    •Intradermal and serologic allergy testing for atopic dermatitis
    •On-site, custom immunotherapy formulation for the treatment of atopic dermatitis
    •Custom diet formulation for food allergies with the Angell Nutrition Specialty Service

    Above are excerpts from:https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/

    PS: The initial testing is expensive (dermatologist) but the maintenance isn’t that bad, I found the treatment ASIT (allergen-specific immunotherapy) to be effective.
    The house mite is a common allergen, it is microscopic and everywhere all year round.
    Impossible to avoid…….see how the fall and winter go. Good luck

    anonymously
    Member

    Environmental allergies wax and wane, they get worse with age.

    Tried raw diets and bones, ended up at the emergency vet x2 ($)
    No thank you. To each his own.

    PS: I am sure there is a veterinary dermatologist closer to you. Just ask your current vet for a referral……or maybe she can suggest treatment for the Canine Atopic Dermatitis your dog appear to be suffering from (based on your description of symptoms)

    #87718
    anonymously
    Member

    Allergies

    Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment.

    There are two types of allergy tests, the intradermal allergy test and blood testing for allergies (serologic allergy testing). In an intradermal allergy test, the fur is clipped on one side of the chest and very small amounts of common allergens are injected into the skin. This test is very precise and is only performed by Veterinary Dermatology services. Because most pets with environmental allergies become exposed to their allergens through their skin, the intradermal allergy test may also best simulate a pet’s natural allergies. In a blood allergy test, a blood sample is obtained and submitted to a laboratory for testing.

    If a pet is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, there are three methods of therapy. The first method of therapy involves removing the allergen from the pet’s environment. Unfortunately, this is not possible in most cases. The second method of therapy involves the use of anti-itch drugs such as anti-histamines or steroids (cortisone). Some of these anti-itch medications do not work in every pet. Other pets develop side-effects from taking certain anti-itch medications.

    The third method of therapy for atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) is allergy injections. Other names for allergy injections include desensitization, hyposensitization, allergy vaccine, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immunotherapy involves a series of injections of diluted allergens. Over time, these injections make a pet less sensitive to their allergens and thus less allergic. Most pet owners are able to learn how to give the injections at home. When based on the results of intradermal allergy testing, immunotherapy helps manage the allergies in approximately 70-90% of pets. Most pets will respond to immunotherapy within 6-9 months, but some pets will require up to a year of immunotherapy injections before a full benefit can be noted.

    Allergy Diagnosis and Management
    Allergies are a common cause of skin and ear conditions in pets. Dogs and cats with allergies may scratch, chew, lick their paws, rub their face or have recurrent ear infections.

    Three types of allergies are common in dogs and cats: food allergies, flea allergy dermatitis and atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies). We offer:
    •Intradermal and serologic allergy testing for atopic dermatitis
    •On-site, custom immunotherapy formulation for the treatment of atopic dermatitis
    •Custom diet formulation for food allergies with the Angell Nutrition Specialty Service

    Above are excerpts from:https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/

    PS:Have you checked the search engine here for “allergies” This topic comes up at least once a week if not more. The initial testing is expensive (dermatologist) but the maintenance isn’t that bad, I found the treatment AST (allergen-specific immunotherapy) to be effective.

    #84366

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems

    anonymously
    Member

    Food sensitivities usually result in GI distress such as vomiting and diarrhea. Food allergies are rare.
    It may be time to consider getting the skin testing done by a dermatologist/specialist.

    You may find this site informative. http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies
    And:
    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/
    “Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment”.

    PS: If your vet has suggested surgery, your dog’s condition must be serious. I would listen to him and/or consult an internal medicine specialist.

    excerpt below from: http://www.2ndchance.info/Apoquel.htm
    Food Allergies are probably over-diagnosed in dogs (they account for, perhaps 5-10%). Hypoallergenic diets are occasionally, but not frequently, helpful in canine atopy cases but you should always give them a try. Food intolerances are more common – but considerably more likely to result in digestive disturbances and diarrhea than in itching problems.

    Also, via the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    BTW: Allergen Specific Immunotherapy does not address food allergies (rare) or food sensitivities.

    A common environmental allergen is the household dust mite, also known as Cockroach, American and Tyropagus putrecentiae. And, no, you don’t have to have cockroaches in your home. These microscopic particles are everywhere, airborne and on the skin of all living things…including you! Constantly being shed all year round.

    Frequent bathing (Malaseb) might help but it won’t completely solve the problem. Also, allergies tend to get worse as the dog gets older.

    Folks will recommend an elimination diet, but how will you know if the dog is responding to environmental allergies, which is causing what? I didn’t find elimination diets helpful.

    #83329

    In reply to: Flaxseed sensitivity?

    anonymously
    Member

    Food sensitivities usually result in GI distress such as vomiting and diarrhea. Food allergies are rare.
    It may be time to consider getting the skin testing done by a dermatologist/specialist.

    You may find this site informative. http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies
    And:
    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/
    “Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment”.

    excerpt below from: http://www.2ndchance.info/Apoquel.htm
    Food Allergies are probably over-diagnosed in dogs (they account for, perhaps 5-10%). Hypoallergenic diets are occasionally, but not frequently, helpful in canine atopy cases but you should always give them a try. Food intolerances are more common – but considerably more likely to result in digestive disturbances and diarrhea than in itching problems.

    Also, via the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    BTW: Allergen Specific Immunotherapy does not address food allergies (rare) or food sensitivities.

    A common environmental allergen is the household dust mite, also known as Cockroach, American and Tyropagus putrecentiae. And, no, you don’t have to have cockroaches in your home. These microscopic particles are everywhere, airborne and on the skin of all living things…including you! Constantly being shed all year round.

    Frequent bathing (Malaseb) might help but it won’t completely solve the problem. Also, allergies tend to get worse as the dog gets older.

    Folks will recommend an elimination diet, but how will you know if the dog is responding to environmental allergies, which is causing what? I didn’t find elimination diets helpful.
    However, my dog does best on Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea.

    #83202
    anonymously
    Member

    You may find this site informative. http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies
    And:
    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/
    “Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment”.

    excerpt below from: http://www.2ndchance.info/Apoquel.htm
    Food Allergies are probably over-diagnosed in dogs (they account for, perhaps 5-10%). Hypoallergenic diets are occasionally, but not frequently, helpful in canine atopy cases but you should always give them a try. Food intolerances are more common – but considerably more likely to result in digestive disturbances and diarrhea than in itching problems.

    Also, via the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    BTW: Allergen Specific Immunotherapy does not address food allergies (rare) or food sensitivities.

    A common environmental allergen is the household dust mite, also known as Cockroach, American and Tyropagus putrecentiae. And, no, you don’t have to have cockroaches in your home. These microscopic particles are everywhere, airborne and on the skin of all living things…including you! Constantly being shed all year round.

    Frequent bathing (Malaseb) might help but it won’t completely solve the problem. Also, allergies tend to get worse as the dog gets older.

    Folks will recommend an elimination diet, but how will you know if the dog is responding to environmental allergies, which is causing what? I didn’t find elimination diets helpful.
    However, my dog does best on Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea.

    #82688
    anonymously
    Member

    You may find this site informative. http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies
    And:
    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/
    “Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment”.

    excerpt below from: http://www.2ndchance.info/Apoquel.htm
    Food Allergies are probably over-diagnosed in dogs (they account for, perhaps 5-10%). Hypoallergenic diets are occasionally, but not frequently, helpful in canine atopy cases but you should always give them a try. Food intolerances are more common – but considerably more likely to result in digestive disturbances and diarrhea than in itching problems.

    Also, via the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    BTW: Allergen Specific Immunotherapy does not address food allergies (rare) or food sensitivities. See my posts for more information.

    #82525
    anonymously
    Member

    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/
    “Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment”.
    excerpt below from: http://www.2ndchance.info/Apoquel.htm
    Food Allergies are probably over-diagnosed in dogs (they account for, perhaps 5-10%). Hypoallergenic diets are occasionally, but not frequently, helpful in canine atopy cases but you should always give them a try. Food intolerances are more common – but considerably more likely to result in digestive disturbances and diarrhea than in itching problems.

    The best choice would be to see a board-certified veterinary dermatologist, if one is available near you (here is a list: http://www.acvd.org/).

    My dog was tested for environmental allergies by a dermatologist and has responded well to allergen-specific immunotherapy. We didn’t do the blood test for food allergies. As food sensitivities tend to fluctuate anyway.
    I would never consider any mail-in saliva or hair test. Most people complain that their dogs test positive for everything!

    I assume you have checked via the search engine here https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    #82319
    anonymously
    Member

    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/

    “Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment”.

    #74331
    Anonymous
    Member

    Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment.

    There are two types of allergy tests, the intradermal allergy test and blood testing for allergies (serologic allergy testing). In an intradermal allergy test, the fur is clipped on one side of the chest and very small amounts of common allergens are injected into the skin. This test is very precise and is only performed by Veterinary Dermatology services. Because most pets with environmental allergies become exposed to their allergens through their skin, the intradermal allergy test may also best simulate a pet’s natural allergies. In a blood allergy test, a blood sample is obtained and submitted to a laboratory for testing.

    If a pet is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, there are three methods of therapy. The first method of therapy involves removing the allergen from the pet’s environment. Unfortunately, this is not possible in most cases. The second method of therapy involves the use of anti-itch drugs such as anti-histamines or steroids (cortisone). Some of these anti-itch medications do not work in every pet. Other pets develop side-effects from taking certain anti-itch medications.

    The third method of therapy for atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) is allergy injections. Other names for allergy injections include desensitization, hyposensitization, allergy vaccine, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immunotherapy involves a series of injections of diluted allergens. Over time, these injections make a pet less sensitive to their allergens and thus less allergic. Most pet owners are able to learn how to give the injections at home. When based on the results of intradermal allergy testing, immunotherapy helps manage the allergies in approximately 70-90% of pets. Most pets will respond to immunotherapy within 6-9 months, but some pets will require up to a year of immunotherapy injections before a full benefit can be noted.
    http://www.mspca.org/vet-services/angell-boston/dermatology/boston-dematology-allergies.html

    #73328

    Topic: Allergies

    in forum Diet and Health
    Anonymous
    Member

    http://www.itchology.com/dog-allergy-help/dog-itchy.html

    “Watching your dog suffer from allergies can be frustrating and heartbreaking. As pet parents, we want to be involved in helping our pets when they are struggling. This feature-rich app empowers YOU to take control of your dog’s allergy management and provide substantial data to your veterinarian. When you use Itchology it will help your veterinarian uncover causes of your dog’s itch and identify effective treatments”.

    http://www.itchology.com/dog-allergy-help/atopic-dermatitis-faq.html

    “Atopic dermatitis, one form of allergic dermatitis, is one of the most common causes of chronic itching in dogs, along with flea allergy dermatitis and food allergy. The persistent itch can make your pet miserable, even changing his personality. The symptoms may occur seasonally or throughout the year”.

    “Atopic dermatitis is caused by an allergic reaction to dust mites, pollens, or molds. Symptoms can flare up with changes in the weather or with dry skin”.

    #73120
    Anonymous
    Member

    Contact dermatitis is atopic dermatitis (described in the article above).
    I got incorrect information from the regular vet, I know you want to minimize the symptoms and find a solution, food, medication, shampoos, supplements, dehumidifier, air purifier…..

    That’s what I did too, if you read my posts, you’ll see that nothing worked until my dog saw the specialist and started allergy specific immunotherapy.
    Most allergens are airborne, impossible to avoid.

    Now she can roll around in the grass! Eat a variety of things, in fact she has cooked chicken several times a week.

    It’s so frustrating to watch people go through this with their pets. They don’t want to spend the money to go to a specialist and yet they end up spending much more than that going back and forth to the regular vet and buying all kinds of things that don’t work.

    Not to mention all the discomfort the dog goes through.

    PS: The supplements and diet and frequent baths have their place, in fact I still bath my dog once a week with Malaseb or a GNC antifungal shampoo for dogs. But they are not strong enough (alone) the stop the symptoms.

    Some good info here http://www.allergydogcentral.com/

    Also, allergies get worse with age, not better. My dog is so much more relaxed now, it’s like a different personality. They can become snappy and neurotic with all that pruritus.

    The symptoms you describe sound worse than what my dog had, and she was suffering.

    #73103
    Anonymous
    Member

    Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment.

    There are two types of allergy tests, the intradermal allergy test and blood testing for allergies (serologic allergy testing). In an intradermal allergy test, the fur is clipped on one side of the chest and very small amounts of common allergens are injected into the skin. This test is very precise and is only performed by Veterinary Dermatology services. Because most pets with environmental allergies become exposed to their allergens through their skin, the intradermal allergy test may also best simulate a pet’s natural allergies. In a blood allergy test, a blood sample is obtained and submitted to a laboratory for testing.

    If a pet is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, there are three methods of therapy. The first method of therapy involves removing the allergen from the pet’s environment. Unfortunately, this is not possible in most cases. The second method of therapy involves the use of anti-itch drugs such as anti-histamines or steroids (cortisone). Some of these anti-itch medications do not work in every pet. Other pets develop side-effects from taking certain anti-itch medications.

    The third method of therapy for atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) is allergy injections. Other names for allergy injections include desensitization, hyposensitization, allergy vaccine, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immunotherapy involves a series of injections of diluted allergens. Over time, these injections make a pet less sensitive to their allergens and thus less allergic. Most pet owners are able to learn how to give the injections at home. When based on the results of intradermal allergy testing, immunotherapy helps manage the allergies in approximately 70-90% of pets. Most pets will respond to immunotherapy within 6-9 months, but some pets will require up to a year of immunotherapy injections before a full benefit can be noted.
    http://www.mspca.org/vet-services/angell-boston/dermatology/boston-dematology-allergies.html

    #72292
    Anonymous
    Member

    Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment.

    There are two types of allergy tests, the intradermal allergy test and blood testing for allergies (serologic allergy testing). In an intradermal allergy test, the fur is clipped on one side of the chest and very small amounts of common allergens are injected into the skin. This test is very precise and is only performed by Veterinary Dermatology services. Because most pets with environmental allergies become exposed to their allergens through their skin, the intradermal allergy test may also best simulate a pet’s natural allergies. In a blood allergy test, a blood sample is obtained and submitted to a laboratory for testing.

    If a pet is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, there are three methods of therapy. The first method of therapy involves removing the allergen from the pet’s environment. Unfortunately, this is not possible in most cases. The second method of therapy involves the use of anti-itch drugs such as anti-histamines or steroids (cortisone). Some of these anti-itch medications do not work in every pet. Other pets develop side-effects from taking certain anti-itch medications.

    The third method of therapy for atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) is allergy injections. Other names for allergy injections include desensitization, hyposensitization, allergy vaccine, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immunotherapy involves a series of injections of diluted allergens. Over time, these injections make a pet less sensitive to their allergens and thus less allergic. Most pet owners are able to learn how to give the injections at home. When based on the results of intradermal allergy testing, immunotherapy helps manage the allergies in approximately 70-90% of pets. Most pets will respond to immunotherapy within 6-9 months, but some pets will require up to a year of immunotherapy injections before a full benefit can be noted.
    http://www.mspca.org/vet-services/angell-boston/dermatology/boston-dematology-allergies.html

    #71952
    Anonymous
    Member

    Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment.

    There are two types of allergy tests, the intradermal allergy test and blood testing for allergies (serologic allergy testing). In an intradermal allergy test, the fur is clipped on one side of the chest and very small amounts of common allergens are injected into the skin. This test is very precise and is only performed by Veterinary Dermatology services. Because most pets with environmental allergies become exposed to their allergens through their skin, the intradermal allergy test may also best simulate a pet’s natural allergies. In a blood allergy test, a blood sample is obtained and submitted to a laboratory for testing.

    If a pet is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, there are three methods of therapy. The first method of therapy involves removing the allergen from the pet’s environment. Unfortunately, this is not possible in most cases. The second method of therapy involves the use of anti-itch drugs such as anti-histamines or steroids (cortisone). Some of these anti-itch medications do not work in every pet. Other pets develop side-effects from taking certain anti-itch medications.

    The third method of therapy for atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) is allergy injections. Other names for allergy injections include desensitization, hyposensitization, allergy vaccine, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immunotherapy involves a series of injections of diluted allergens. Over time, these injections make a pet less sensitive to their allergens and thus less allergic. Most pet owners are able to learn how to give the injections at home. When based on the results of intradermal allergy testing, immunotherapy helps manage the allergies in approximately 70-90% of pets. Most pets will respond to immunotherapy within 6-9 months, but some pets will require up to a year of immunotherapy injections before a full benefit can be noted.
    http://www.mspca.org/vet-services/angell-boston/dermatology/boston-dematology-allergies.html

    #70834

    In reply to: PLEASE HELP!!

    Anonymous
    Member

    Allergies? If the current treatment is not effective and the dog is seriously uncomfortable, you may want to consider seeing a specialist/dermatologist, especially if this has been going on for 1 year/4 seasons without any significant periods of relief.

    http://www.allergydogcentral.com/2011/06/30/dog-allergy-testing-and-allergy-shots/#comment-1283

    Or consult a homeopath http://theavh.org/

    Dr Falconer’s latest blog http://vitalanimal.com/natural-dog-food-work/

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/atopic-dermatitisyeast-issues-smartest-food-choice/

    Helpful article below:
    By Klaus Loft, DVM
    Angell Dermatology Service

    Anyone who suffers debilitating environmental allergies tied to changing seasons, pet dander or household dust mites knows first-hand the misery of a scratchy throat, itchy eyes or painful rashes.

    Not everyone knows, however, that our pets can experience similar allergic reactions — and other very bothersome dermatological issues. But our pets need not suffer in silence. Modern veterinary science has evolved such that advanced, comprehensive treatments are now available to treat a range of skin conditions.

    Top pet dermatological issues

    Our four-legged friends suffer from some of the same skin issues as we do — and several that we do not. The most common conditions we see at Angell include:

    •Parasites, such as mites, fleas and mange (scabies)
    •Infectious diseases, such as Staphylococcal pyoderma (“Staph”) skin infections, yeast and fungal infections and skin fold infections
    •Systemic diseases, such as autoimmune diseases
    •Skin cancer, such as Squamous cell carcinoma, cutaneous lymphoma, Mast cell tumors
    •Allergies, such as flea allergy dermatitis, adverse food reactions, environmental allergies, etc.

    All of these conditions can become serious and, if untreated, dramatically reduce quality of life. But the tremendous strides made in veterinary innovation, however, is very good news for our pets. Specifically, the testing and treatments for allergies now rivals human healthcare in its sophistication, quality of care and long-term health outcomes.

    ‘Doc, it itches when I do this!’

    Unlike humans, dogs and cats cannot tell us about their dermatological health issues. So we as pet owners must look for the signs. The most common indicators that a pet is suffering from some kind of allergy involve frequent episodes of ear infections, red raised or open sores on the skin, constant licking or biting of paws or groin — sometimes causing wounds that will not go away.

    Allergies present a particular challenge because there can be hundreds (even thousands) of potential allergens that impact pet health, from foods to pollen from grasses, weeds, trees, dust mites and more. Today’s specialty veterinary hospitals have access to the very latest diagnostic tests to get to the bottom of what’s ailing our pet. Among these tests is the Intra Dermal Test (IDT).

    IDT is generally considered the gold standard of testing for identifying allergens that cause pets to suffer from chronic skin and/or ear diseases. IDT involves injections of a series of concentrated allergens into the skin to determine which of them generate allergic reactions in a given animal. The use of fluorescein — a chemical that illuminates the inflammation caused by the injected allergens in order to visualize the strength of individual reactions — is key to accurately diagnosing pet allergies, and is just one of the many ways veterinarians use new technologies to improve care and diagnostics.

    The results of IDT (as well as a review of the pet’s medical history) can then inform comprehensive immunotherapy treatments to relieve suffering. Veterinary dermatologists rely on IDT to build customized treatment plans for patients called Allergen Specific Immuno Therapy or “ASIT” for short.

    ASIT involves a series of injections specifically created for the allergic animal’s skin. These injections, of diluted allergens, are designed to make a pet less sensitive to their allergens over time. In most cases these injections must be continued for life to reduce symptoms, but they are highly effective. Seventy to 90 percent of pets experience a reduction in symptoms as a result of ASIT treatment. These treatments can be delivered even more easily via droplets under the tongue, perfect for pet owners who are squeamish about giving injections to their pet.

    This treatment is very new to the North American field of medicine (both human and veterinary) and underscores just how far innovation in veterinary medicine has come.

    When it’s time to see the vet

    Many pet owners are understandably concerned about taking their animals to the veterinarian because the cost (to say nothing of the fear some animals experience when going do the doctor) may outweigh any perceived reduction in suffering. To help pet owners know when it’s time to bring Fido to the doctor I’ve compiled my “Top Ten” list of dermatological symptoms that should never be ignored:

    •Intense itching of the skin (head shaking, running the face into the carpet, furniture, etc.)
    •Biting at the skin that creates red, raw crusting areas of the skin
    •Multiple ear infections (head shaking, odor from ears, scratching at the ears with hind legs)
    •Paw licking or chewing and frequent infections of the skin in the webbed skin of the paws
    •Staining of the fur of the paws and nails on multiple feet
    •Reoccurring skin infections in the groin, under the shoulders, perianal areas (on or under the tail)
    •Greasy scaling skin and/or fur with odorous skin
    •Hair loss, or thinning of the fur
    •Dark pigmentation of the skin that is chronically infected
    •Sudden depigmentation of skin

    Allergies and other dermatological issues can be as frustrating for pet owners and their veterinarians as they can be for pets. I encourage any pet owner whose animal is experiencing any of these symptoms to consult with their veterinarian.

    Anonymous
    Member

    Allergies? If the current treatment is not effective and the dog is seriously uncomfortable, you may want to consider seeing a specialist/dermatologist, this has been going on for 4 months….seasonal?
    http://www.allergydogcentral.com/2011/06/30/dog-allergy-testing-and-allergy-shots/#comment-1283
    Or consult a homeopath http://theavh.org/

    Dr Falconer’s latest blog http://vitalanimal.com/natural-dog-food-work/

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/atopic-dermatitisyeast-issues-smartest-food-choice/

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