Weight Loss Advice for 2 Pomeranians

Dog Food Advisor Forums Diet and Health Weight Loss Advice for 2 Pomeranians

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  • #96856 Report Abuse

    Brittany
    Member

    Hello,

    I own 2 Pomeranians, Samson and Lacey. They have both gained some weight over the last year, and I’m at a loss on how to slim them down. I already tried restricting treats and cutting back on the amount of food they get, but to no avail. Samson weighs 15 lbs when the vet thinks he should weigh 10lbs. Lacey is a mix, and weighs 21 lbs when she should weigh about 17 lbs. I feed them 2x a day. Samson gets 1/8 cup of dry food with a spoonful of wet, while Lacey gets 1/4 cup dry with a spoonful of wet also. The dry food is California Natural Venison and wet is Wervua.

    I try to walk them when I can. In the warmer months, I pretty much will walk them everyday. They are both seniors. Samson is 8, and Lacey 10.

    If anyone has any advice, PLEASE help! The vet recommended a low protein diet, but I heard high protein is better… I just don’t know what to do anymore.

    #96874 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Go what the vet that has examined them recommends. I would give no snacks except raw carrots (1/4) to chew on once or twice a day. Add water to their kibble. In fact, if you presoak it, it puffs up and they think they are getting more.
    I would find a way to increase their activity, more walks around the block, even if leisurely and only for a few minutes at a time.
    Swimming is the best activity for burning calories and it’s easy on the joints for seniors.
    By any chance, do you have pet health insurance? I ask, because I have heard that if the vet orders aqua therapy (swimming in a heated pool, offered at pet rehab facilities) for weight loss or a medical condition it may be covered. One minute of swimming equals 4 minutes of running.

    #96885 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Excerpt below from: https://www.vetinfo.com/aquatic-therapy-for-dogs.html
    Aquatic therapy for dogs is a form of rehabilitation and athletic conditioning. In both cases, canine aquatic therapy prevents injury, lessens pain, strengthens muscles, and restores or enhances mobility. Dogs do not have to live near water or like to swim to undergo aquatic therapy, which occurs indoors in a shallow tank. Aquatic therapy for dogs is also known as canine hydrotherapy, canine aqua training and canine underwater training.

    #96886 Report Abuse

    Acroyali
    Member

    Brittany, did the vet mention WHY he or she would suggest low protein?

    #96887 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    “If anyone has any advice, PLEASE help! The vet recommended a low protein diet, but I heard high protein is better… I just don’t know what to do anymore.”

    I just assumed that lab work was done that included kidney function tests and maybe the bun and creatinine was slightly elevated? Often this is the case with seniors. I would make sure their water intake was adequate, add a splash to the kibble.

    #96914 Report Abuse

    Brittany
    Member

    She didn’t really say why, but apparently it’s supposed to help??

    #96915 Report Abuse

    Brittany
    Member

    They both drink water enough I think… Lacey didn’t get bloodwork done, but Samson’s showed up fine, besides slightly elevated calcium levels. My vet looked into this, and said there is possibly a mass on his parathyroid, but more testing has to be done because they are still not sure. Other then that, everything is ok with them as far as I know…

    #96916 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Have the dogs had senior workups? Lab work? Was it within normal limits?
    Give the vet a call and ask that she call you back when she has a minute, I’m sure she won’t mind answering your questions. But, dogs that are inactive tend to have difficulty tolerating rich, high protein, high calorie diets…. See what the vet recommends.

    PS: Add a splash of water to meals. Most dogs, especially seniors don’t consume enough water. Offer frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate, otherwise, certain breeds are vulnerable to develop bladder stones (calcium oxalate and struvite come to mind).

    #97014 Report Abuse

    Acroyali
    Member

    I agree–I’d call the vet and question a bit further, not in a confrontational manner of course, but just tell the vet you want to do what’s right but you need to understand what’s happening in order to make the best decision possible.
    With that said, even though dogs need protein (as do we), I’m a little weary of some of the super duper high protein dry diets simply because they’re fed on a dry matter basis, but that’s just my opinion and comfort level coming into play. Best of luck, Brittany!

    #97048 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    I’ve never heard of low protein for weight loss; this is just me but I’d do the opposite. I used Wellness Core reduced fat for a dog we adopted; I’d try Annamaet Lean now. No treats but if you must, use fresh green beans. Play games inside with them for exercise.

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