Canola oil is NOT innocuous as inferred by dog food advisor

Dog Food Advisor Forums Canine Nutrition Canola oil is NOT innocuous as inferred by dog food advisor

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #29211 Report Abuse

    Elcy
    Member

    It really tans my hide that this site promotes the use of canola oil as a harmless and even beneficial ingredient based on the advice of ONE site(snopes) that has reviewed “urban legends” with questionable bias in the past. I could cite dozens of other sites that speak to the dangers of this highly refined product, why are all of those being ignored by Dog Food Advisor? Since when is a “food” that has to be BLEACHED and DEODERIZED to be made edible considered healthy? Not to mention the very high (80%) GMO content!

    Read the below article, funny that snopes only quoted a small portion of it and left out the warnings.

    “But here’s the main problem with canola oil, and why you should think twice before using it – canola oil is highly refined. Like high fructose corn syrup that is not “corn sugar” once it is extracted and processed, canola oil also has to go through a similar regimen. The oil is removed by a combination of high temperature mechanical pressing and solvent extraction. Traces of the solvent (usually hexane) remain in the oil, even after considerable refining. Canola oil goes through the process of caustic <b>refining, bleaching and degumming</b> – all of which involve high temperatures or chemicals of questionable safety. And because itis high in omega-3 and 6 fatty acids, (11% and 21% respectively) which easily become rancid and foul-smelling when subjected to oxygen and high temperatures, it must be <b>deodorized</b>. The standard deodorization process removes a large portion of the omega-3 fatty acids by turning them into trans fatty acids. The Canadian government lists the trans content of canola at a minimal 0.2 percent, but it is speculated that they are actually much higher due to the processing. This processing is much different from that of olive oil, which most often is first cold pressed to reduce the oxidation of the oil. Harmful chemicals and fatty acid-altering processing means do not occur with olive oil as they do with canola oil.

    Another major problem with canola oil is that 80% of the acres sown are <b>genetically modified canola</b>, and it’s not the GMO type of product that has been developed for the benefit of the species of plant, but for the benefit of the herbicide. First introduced to Canada in 1995, genetically modified canola has become a point of controversy and contentious legal battles as Monsanto’s “Roundup Ready” herbicide allows farmers to drench both their crops and crop land with the herbicide so as to be able to kill nearby weeds (and any other green thing the herbicide touches) without killing their crop. The effects of this herbicide on the environment as well as the health of individuals who consume the products have been questioned. (Read more on pesticides and herbicides here.) Superweeds have begun to develop, and much like the overuse of antibiotics, eventually a resistance to the chemical builds up, and a more powerful one must be used. Monsanto is already working on a stronger herbicide (called SmartStax) which they hope to debut soon.” http://www.drgangemi.com/2011/07/canola-oil/

    #29216 Report Abuse

    theBCnut
    Member

    Try to find a scientific document instead of an opinion about why one person doesn’t like it. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t like canola oil, and I believe it is bad stuff. But my belief does not prove it is so. Dr Mike requires proof and so far, there isn’t any. He does advocate a rotational diet though so that your dog will not be continually exposed to harmful ingredients, even the ones we don’t know yet whether they are harmful or not.

    #29217 Report Abuse

    Elcy
    Member

    You need “scientific” proof that canola oil is degummed, deoderized and bleached and that this is a bad thing? I’m not sure I follow.
    http://youtu.be/omjWmLG0EAs

    #29218 Report Abuse

    theBCnut
    Member

    No, I do not need scientific proof of any of those things. As I said “Don’t get me wrong, I don’t like canola oil, and I believe it is bad stuff.”

    Dr Mike needs scientific proof that the fact that canola oil is all of those things actually makes it harmful. Do you see the difference?

    #29219 Report Abuse

    Elcy
    Member

    OK, I guess I was assuming a certain amount of common sense. If someone can’t deduce that eating food that MUST be degummed, deoderized and bleached before it becomes edible is not a good thing for anyone’s health, well, I guess I am fighting a losing battle.

    #29232 Report Abuse

    theBCnut
    Member

    Don’t assume you are fighting a losing battle, if your battle is to inform people. Just because there is no proof that degumming, deoderizing, and bleaching canola is harmful, doesn’t mean that people won’t decide for themselves not to risk it until the science catches up. That’s where I’m at. It does not sound like something I need to risk, so I choose to avoid canola oil until I feel that science has proved that it’s safe, to my satisfaction. Somehow I don’t think they will be able to do that. I would like to see canola listed as a controversial(red flagged) ingredient, because even though the science isn’t there, the controversy is. Keep on letting people know what the controversy is all about.

    #29233 Report Abuse

    losul
    Member

    Interesting video Elcy, thanks for posting.

    #29292 Report Abuse

    theBCnut
    Member

    BTW, canola oil is now a red flag ingredient and here is how Dr Mike describes it

    Much of the objection regarding canola oil appears to be related to the use of genetically modified rapeseed as its source material.

    Yet others find the negative stories about canola oil more the stuff of urban legend than actual science.1

    In any case, plant-based oils like canola are less biologically available to a dog than fish oil as a source of quality omega-3 fats.

    That certainly does not sound like he promotes the use of canola oil to me.

    #30128 Report Abuse

    Elcy
    Member

    “That certainly does not sound like he promotes the use of canola oil to me.”

    Patty, I could agree with you if sources of balanced information had been provided, as it stands they provided one link to a source containing partial information.

    #30133 Report Abuse

    theBCnut
    Member

    Maybe you define the word promote differently than I do.

    pro mote
    transitive verb
    1a: to advance in station, rank, or honor-nope
    b:to change(a pawn) into a piece in chess by moving to the eighth rank-nope
    c:to advance(a student) from one grade to the next higher grade-nope
    2a:to contribute to the growth or prosperity of-nope
    b:to help bring into being-nope
    c:to present(merchandise) for buyer acceptance through advertising, publicity, or discounting-nope
    3 slang: to get possession of by doubtful means or by ingenuity-nope

    He definitely doesn’t condemn it, but that is not the same thing as promoting it.

    #30136 Report Abuse

    Elcy
    Member

    Providing one side of an argument is certainly “promoting” that view.

    #49291 Report Abuse

    Ann P
    Member

    Please don’t wait until you have scientific “proof” to sounds the alarms about the health hazards of Canola oil! You won’t easily find them–especially in relation to dogs. Unfortunately, in the scientific community–to the chagrin of many ethical scientists, money rules! Mary Enig, Ph.D, is a leading authority on lipids and was one of the first scientists to raise serious concerns about the health effects of trans-fatty acids and she was academically black-balled for it. The the power of the vegetable oil lobby did her in–at least for a time. Dr. Enig is a co-author of a cookbook entitled, “Nourishing Traditions”. In a section about fats, this is what is written about Canola oil:
    “Canola Oil contains 5 percent saturated fat, 57 percent oleic acid, 23 percent omega-6 and 10-15 percent omega 3. The newest oil on the market, canola oil was developed from the rape seed, a member of the mustard family. Rape see is considered unsuited to human consumption because it contains a long-chain fatty acid called erucic acid, which under some circumstances is associated with fibrotic heart lesions. Canola oil was bred to contain little if any erucic acid and has drawn the attention of nutritionists because of its high oleic-acid content. But there are some indications that canola oil presents dangers of its own. It has a high sulphur content and goes rancid easily. Baked goods made with canola oil develop mold very quickly. During the deodorizing process, the omega-3 fatty acids of processed canola oil are transformed into TRANS fatty acids, similar to those in margarine and possibly more dangerous. A recent study indicates that “heart healthy” canola oil actually creates a deficiency of vitamin E, a vitamin required for a healthy cardiovascular system. Other studies indicate that even low erucic-acid canola oil causes heart lesions particularly when the diet is also low in saturated fat.” Here are the three studies cited (I don’t know how to italicize here–so it’s not in proper form):

    Sauer, FD, et al, Nutrition Research, 1997, 17:2:259-269

    Kramer, J K G, et al, Lip1982, 17:372-382;

    Trenholm, H L, et al, Canadian Institute Food Science Technology Journal, 1979, 12:189-193

    Between my roommate and myself, there are four dogs in our household. We have been tight on money so took pains to find the least expensive dog food of reasonable quality and grain-free for our dogs. We were directed to a new dog food that had Canola oil listed as its fourth ingredient. Our two oldest dogs got extremely sick on it (with vomiting, diarrhea and extreme lethargy) and the younger ones started getting loose stools and eating a lot of grass. Yes, yes! I know, “correlation is not causation”! But I will no longer gamble my dogs’ health on Canola oil. I may just have to get a third job! Here is an article that also cites a few studies:

    http://breathing.com/articles/canola-oil.htm

    It is assumed that dried dog food can be stored at room temperature. Knowing how fragile canola oil is when it comes to rancidity, just imagine how rancid it is in these dried dog foods! Please revisit the canola oil debate and warn your readers!

    #49292 Report Abuse

    Ann P
    Member

    Sorry! I made a typo when citing one of the studies below: In the Kramer study, the publication should read, “Lipids”.

    #49293 Report Abuse

    Ann P
    Member

    Another article on the dangers of canola oil, but no citations with it: http://pets.answers.com/pet-care/good-or-bad-canola-soybean-safflower-oil-in-dog-cat-food

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