Wysong Gourmet (Canned)

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Rating: ★★★★☆

Wysong Gourmet canned dog food receives the Advisor’s second-highest tier rating of 4 stars.

The Wysong Gourmet product line includes three canned dog foods, each claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for adult maintenance.

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Wysong Gourmet Liver
  • Wysong Gourmet Chicken
  • Wysong Gourmet Seafood

Wysong Gourmet Liver was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Wysong Gourmet Liver

Canned Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 39% | Fat = 27% | Carbs = 27%

Ingredients: Chicken liver, chicken, beef, water sufficient for processing, ground extruded whole soybeans, wheat germ, ground brown rice, dicalcium phosphate, taurine, dl-methionine, yeast culture, ground flax seeds, dried kelp, dried wheat grass powder, dried barley grass powder, natural extractives of sage and rosemary, garlic, black pepper, artichoke, ascorbic acid, zinc proteinate, iron proteinate, vitamin E supplement, niacin supplement, manganese proteinate, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, copper proteinate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin supplement, vitamin A acetate, folic acid, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement, vitamin D3 supplement

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 5.8%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis10%7%NA
Dry Matter Basis39%27%27%
Calorie Weighted Basis30%50%20%

The first ingredient in this dog food is chicken liver. This is an organ meat sourced from a named animal and thus considered a beneficial component.

The second ingredient is chicken. Chicken is considered “the clean combination of flesh and skin… derived from the parts or whole carcasses of chicken”.1

The third ingredient is beef, another quality raw item. Beef is defined as “the clean flesh derived from slaughtered cattle” and includes skeletal muscle or the muscle tissues of the tongue, diaphragm, heart or esophagus.1

Both chicken and beef are naturally rich in all ten essential amino acids required by a dog to sustain life.

The fourth ingredient is water, which adds nothing but moisture to this food. Water is a routine finding in most canned dog foods.

The fifth ingredient is whole soybeans. Even though soybeans contains over 80% protein, this ingredient would be expected to have a lower biological value than meat.

And less costly plant-based products like this can notably boost the total protein reported on the label — a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this food.

We rarely consider soy a preferred component in any dog food.

The sixth ingredient is wheat germ. Wheat germ is a nutritious by-product of the wheat milling process and also rich in dietary fiber, B-vitamins and minerals.

However, since it contains at least 25% plant-based protein and depending upon the amount, this ingredient can boost the total protein reported on the label — a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The seventh ingredient is ground brown rice, a complex carbohydrate that (once cooked) can be fairly easy to digest. However, aside from its natural energy content, rice is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The eighth ingredient is dicalcium phosphate, likely used here as a dietary calcium supplement.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With four notable exceptions

First, flaxseed is one of the best plant sources of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Provided they’ve first been ground into a meal, flax seeds are also rich in soluble fiber.

However, flaxseed contains about 19% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

Next, garlic can be a controversial item. Although most experts favor the ingredient for its numerous health benefits, garlic (in rare cases) has been linked to Heinz body anemia in dogs.3

However, the limited professional literature we surveyed provided no definitive warnings regarding the use of garlic — especially when used in small amounts (as it likely is here).

In addition, although yeast culture is high in B-vitamins and protein, it can also be used as a probiotic to aid in digestion.

And lastly, this food also contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Wysong Gourmet Canned Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Wysong Gourmet canned dog food looks like an above average wet product.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 39%, a fat level of 27% and estimated carbohydrates of about 27%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 39% and a mean fat level of 27%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 27% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 70%.

Near-average protein. Above-average fat. And near-average carbs when compared to a typical wet dog food.

When you consider the protein-boosting effects of the soybeans and flaxseed, this looks like the profile of a wet product containing a moderate amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Wysong Gourmet canned dog food is a meat-based wet product using a moderate amount of chicken, chicken liver and fish as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 4 stars.

Highly recommended.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

To learn how we support the cost of operating this website, please visit our public Disclosure and Disclaimer page.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

12/13/2009 Original review
04/18/2012 Review updated
10/17/2013 Review updated
10/17/2013 Last Update

  1. Association of American Feed Control Officials
  2. Association of American Feed Control Officials
  3. Yamato et al, Heinz Body hemolytic anemia with eccentrocytosis from ingestion of Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum) and garlic (Allium sativum) in a dog, Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association 41:68-73 (2005)
  • amee

    nmike the ndenhtist acts like an haprehntice.
    This site is highly nmanipulatedb.When you say someting against their favorate companies for instance Nature Logic or orijin then you find yoru posts eather

    officially deletedn or magically dissappeared a few days later. Only the devotees posts will remain.When you say someting about

    their nheigh proteinn diets who are proven nwrong then they will bullyn,flag,nblock and ndelete you in order to

    promote their subversivenn angenda.i have to write this way otherwise I end up in nspamn.They misrepresentedb the bstudies

    and then when you point out the ndangers their own nstudies have shown they will delete your posts making up stories.

    They construe textbooks for instance claiming the textbooks state you can give 40 or 50% knprotein to a senior dog

    while they say 28% max. then they use nstudies sponsored by pharmacytical companies or purina to falsely substantiate their claims.

    when you point out the flawsn then your posts will dissappearn. Nshawnna will lie pretty much about anything to

    promote her 50% nprotein dietnn. For instance falsely claiming her dog is not on medication or those dogs would not live very long

    while it would not be unusual if the dog is still alive. Then she keeps contradicting herself how much knprotein she feeds

    depending on the arguments.check out the web under nscammn about more information.

    100s of people have been nbulliedn and blockedn on here. Vetsn get regularly blockedn and their posts deletedn. Mnike the ndentist

    is not an expert yet him among the devoteesnn without any credentials make so many false claims but think they know it all.

    Please don’t buy into their highnnnproteinn meatmnn based dietn it is all not nessessarly superior, also don’t believe their

    exchagerated claims on lentils,ngluten,nntomatoes,nraw food etc.

    Buyer Beware!

  • Patti

    PS – soybeans aren’t very digestible and are one of the top 3 allergens for dogs. Not to mention, pretty much all soy these days is GMO!

  • Patti

    Dogs would have to eat several bulbs of garlic to experience problems with it. I work in holistic pet retail, and garlic is a great immune system booster as well as a flea preventative. We sell it in a powder form with brewers yeast, but there are lots of people giving their dogs and cats fresh garlic. One clove per 45-50lbs is a good dose. Just stay away from onions!