Wild Calling! Rocky Mountain Medley (Dry)

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Rating: ★★★★★

Wild Calling! Rocky Mountain Medley Dog Food receives the Advisor’s top rating of 5 stars.

The Wild Calling! Rocky Mountain Medley product line includes three dry dog foods, each claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for all life stages.

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Wild Calling! Trout, Lamb Meal and Turkey Meal
  • Wild Calling! Duck, Salmon Meal and Lamb Meal
  • Wild Calling! Elk, Whitefish Meal and Turkey Meal

Wild Calling! Trout, Lamb Meal and Turkey Meal was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Wild Calling! Trout, Lamb Meal and Turkey Meal

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 35% | Fat = 20% | Carbs = 37%

Ingredients: Trout, lamb meal, turkey meal, sweet potato, lentils, chicken fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid), tapioca, dried egg product, dried peas, natural flavor, yeast culture, flaxseed meal, potassium chloride, dried seaweed meal, dried cranberries, dried blueberries, whole mussel, dried carrots, dried spinach, dried apples, dried pumpkin, dried broccoli, l-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), calcium carbonate, choline chloride, vitamin E supplement, zinc proteinate, salt, manganese proteinate, ferrous sulfate, niacin, copper proteinate, thiamine mononitrate, calcium pantothenate, vitamin A supplement, riboflavin, vitamin D3 supplement, dried Bacillus subtilis fermentation product, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, calcium iodate, folic acid

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 4.4%

Red items indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis32%18%NA
Dry Matter Basis35%20%37%
Calorie Weighted Basis29%40%31%
Protein = 29% | Fat = 40% | Carbs = 31%

The first ingredient in this dog food is trout, a freshwater species closely related to salmon. Trout is rich rich in omega-3 fatty acids but also contains about 80% water. After cooking, most of that moisture is lost, reducing the meat content to just a fraction of its original weight.

After processing, this item would probably account for a smaller part of the total content of the finished product.

The second ingredient is lamb meal. Lamb meal is considered a meat concentrate and contains nearly 300% more protein than fresh lamb.

The third ingredient is turkey meal, another protein-rich meat concentrate.

The fourth ingredient is sweet potato. Sweet potatoes are a gluten-free source of complex carbohydrates in a dog food. They are naturally rich in dietary fiber and beta carotene.

The fifth ingredient includes lentils. Lentils are a quality source of carbohydrates. Plus (like all legumes) they’re rich in natural fiber.

However, lentils contain about 25% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The sixth ingredient is chicken fat. Chicken fat is obtained from rendering chicken, a process similar to making soup in which the fat itself is skimmed from the surface of the liquid.

Chicken fat is high in linoleic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid essential for life. Although it doesn’t sound very appetizing, chicken fat is actually a quality ingredient.

The seventh ingredient is tapioca, a gluten-free, starchy carbohydrate extract made from the root of the cassava plant.

The eighth ingredient is dried egg product, a dehydrated form of shell-free eggs. Quality can vary significantly. Lower grade egg product can even come from commercial hatcheries — from eggs that have failed to hatch.

In any case, eggs are easy to digest and have an exceptionally high biological value.

The ninth ingredient includes dried peas. Dried peas are a good source of carbohydrates. Plus they’re naturally rich in dietary fiber.

However, dried peas contain about 27% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the meat content of this dog food.

After the natural flavor, we find yeast culture. Although yeast culture is high in B-vitamins and protein, it can also be used as a probiotic to aid in digestion.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With three notable exceptions

First, flaxseed meal is one of the best plant-based sources of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Flax meal is particularly rich in soluble fiber.

However, flaxseed contains about 19% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

Next, we note the inclusion of dried fermentation products in this recipe. Fermentation products are typically added to provide enzymes to aid the animal with digestion.

And lastly, this food contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Wild Calling! Rocky Mountain Medley Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Wild Calling! Rocky Mountain Medley looks like an above-average dry dog food.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 35%, a fat level of 20% and estimated carbohydrates of about 37%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 35% and a mean fat level of 20%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 37% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 56%.

Above-average protein. Above-average fat. And below-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

Even when you consider the protein-boosting effect of the lentils, dried peas, and flaxseed meal, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing a significant amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Wild Calling! Rocky Mountain Medley is a meat-based dry dog food using a significant amount of various species as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 5 stars.

Enthusiastically recommended.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content and when appropriate their fat-to-protein ratios.

Wild Calling! Dog Food
Recall History

The following list (if present) includes all dog food recalls since 2009 directly related to this product line. If there are no recalls listed in this section, we have not yet reported any events.

You can view a complete list of all dog food recalls sorted by date. Or view the same list sorted alphabetically by brand.

To learn why our ratings have nothing to do with a product’s recall history, please visit our Dog Food Recalls FAQ page.

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Advisor’s recall notification list.

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A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

The Dog Food Advisor does not test dog food products.

We rely entirely on the integrity of the information provided by each company. As such, the accuracy of every review is directly dependent upon the specific data a company chooses to share.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

We rely on tips from readers. To report a product change or request an update of any review, please contact us using this form.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

However, we do receive a fee from Chewy.com for each purchase made as a direct result of a referral from our website. This fee is a fixed dollar amount and has nothing to do with the size of an order or the brand selected for purchase.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

11/02/2015 Last Update

  • Ame

    Only buy quality organic dog food. The garbage they sell at Walmart is made of dogs that are murdered at county doggie jail and sick euthanized animals and road kill …the bags the dogs are in are thrown into the machine with flea collars and collars and tags. Really horrifyingly disgusting to say the least. I just read the article. Even the so called rescues are selling animals to the vet schools so they can practice surgery on them…I just saw a story on the news… and every rescue I called advised me never to bring an animal to the rescue shelter because they cannot feed them and are euthanizing them or selling them to labs or the vet schools. Disgusting.

  • Ame

    Wild calling has a 5 star rating

  • Ame

    If your pup ever refuses to eat any kind of dog food just return it to the store… they usually donate any opened… returned… or torn bags. Get a refund or exchange it.

  • B Talley

    I know this conversation was over a year ago, but frankly, that is what these forums are intended to do. People learn a great deal of things by reading responses, solutions, opinions expressed by others. To deny what appears to be basic information gained directly from the manufacturer, seems a bit strange to me. In particular, that Mr. peterson’s email states his response is private only serves to set off red flags to me. Might be an awesome dog food, but anyone that secretive has a reason.

  • LabsRawesome

    Yeah, its like $75 for 25lbs. That’s crazy.
    I checked their store locator.
    I’m going to see if its any cheaper in stores.

  • Crazy4cats

    Ha! The food looks great. I hope it works out.

  • Cannoli

    Ha I just ordered the 4.5 lb bag hopefully my pup likes it. Otherwise the local shelter will be getting it

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    I tried Wild Calling because I won a free bag at my local pet store. I would never buy their products. I had a few questions and emailed them and no one ever answered me. This was more than once. I can’t tolerate horrible customer service. They don’t deserve my business!

  • Crazy4cats

    I just checked Chewy’s prices. It’s way out of my price range! Too bad 🙁

  • Tommy

    Sounds like a plan, and I posted there yesterday. :/)

  • LabsRawesome

    Hey Tommy, I’m sure it was a simple mistake.
    But since you were posting about a food that you were calling Wild on the “Wild Calling” thread it seemed like you were thinking that Wild Calling was Blue Buffalo.
    I’m going to look into buying some Wild Calling also.
    If it doesn’t have a ridiculous price tag.

  • InkedMarie

    May be a simple mistake but since you posted on the review for a food called “WILD Calling”, I came to the conclusion that you didn’t really know the difference between Blue Buffalo and Wild Calling. I can see mistaking Wild Calling for Taste of the Wild but not one of the many Blue products, that happens to have Wild in the name. JMO though.

  • sandy

    I can’t move the conversation. I can delete the whole thing and you can post it on the BB page.

  • Tommy

    Late night typing. lol

  • Tommy

    Sorry for the confusion. I was confused too. lol Article was not, label unfortunately was. Thanks for the catch guys.

  • Tommy

    Yep. Just noticed that. Thanks guys.

  • Tommy

    Agreed. Mistake on my part.

  • Tommy

    Labs simple mistake. 1. i never said Wild Calling. Only Wild, short of Wilderness. 2. Blue has a dog food called, Blue Wilderness Salmon Recipe Adult. (Note the word Wild in their). ..hence the confusion. It’s not like my Shiba eats bags and bags of this, so I’m only picking up a bag every few months. I’ve never tried Wild Calling, but I probably will now since Blue has been tainted. Ultimately, was just trying to warn the community of some bad ethics by a dog food company that is listed as one of the favorites of this site.

  • Tommy

    Totally agree. Wonder if there is a way to move this. Admin?

  • Tommy

    good policy!

  • theBCnut

    If I think a food might be something I want to try, I call or email the company and ask questions. If they don’t want to answer my questions, I don’t buy.

  • LabsRawesome

    Nope. That was Blue Buffalo.
    You should post your info on the Blue Buffalo
    thread. Wild Calling is a totally different food.

  • LabsRawesome

    Both articles he linked to clearly state BB.
    No mention of Wild Calling.
    I can’t figure out how he’s getting the two confused.
    The names aren’t even similar. IDK. 🙂

  • Storm’s Mom

    Wild Calling vs Blue Buffalo Wilderness, maybe? .. that’s all I can come up with anyway *shrug*

  • LabsRawesome

    Blue Buffalo and Wild Calling are two completely different
    Companies/foods, they have nothing to do with each other.
    Both articles you posted are about Blue Buffalo,
    I can’t figure out how you are coming up with Wild Calling.

  • LabsRawesome

    The article you linked to is from The Truth About Pet Food.
    It’s about Blue Buffalo being sued by Purina.
    Blue Buffalo and Wild Calling are two different
    Foods/companies.

  • Storm’s Mom

    This is part of why I feed a fairly large rotation of different brands. There are some I like better than others, and some that Storm does slightly better on than others, but I am in no way loyal to any of them. If something changes with one of them in a way I’m not fond of (for example, the recipe is changed to include way more peas than previously, or the company has a recall (particularly if it handles it badly), I would not hesitate to take it out of the rotation.

  • Storm’s Mom

    They are definitely two different companies, with (as far as I know) no relationship between them.

  • Crazy4cats

    Hi Tommy-
    Are you confusing Wild Calling dog food with Blue Buffalo? Aren’t they are two different companies?

  • InkedMarie

    I’m confused….this link & the other one below talk about Blue Buffalo & Purina. I don’t see any mention of Wild Calling. Maybe I’m missing something.

  • Tommy

    This is where Wild finally admits it after the testing evidence was offered.

    http://iheartdogs.com/breaking-news-blue-buffalo-admits-to-lying-about-ingredients-here-is-why-you-should-care/

    Just last week, a year after the case was filed, Blue Buffalo admitted to using by product meal in “a ‘substantial’ and ‘material’ portion of their pet food.”

    Shameful. Deny until you are caught. No longer will I buy products from this band.

  • Tommy
  • Tommy

    Oh. Major bummer. It seems the dog food industry isn’t regulated all the closely. Testing, though expensive, probably too expensive, would be the only accurate way to really gauge these. 🙁 or… we are just at the mercy of these companies that try and sell us their food with any label they seem fit. I’m sure the majority are honest…well, at least I hope so.

  • sandy

    That’s interesting. Where did you find that info?

  • theBCnut

    Just what is on the government regulated labels and/or company website.

  • Tommy

    It seems that tests have been done and Wild has been caught lying about their ingredients. Does this site test the food or just take what is written on the labels? 🙁

  • Jän Thømas R.

    a quick internet search of information from professionals in the industry says that you’re wrong, but it also told me that pea fiber isn’t a great fiber option for dog food either

  • Michelle Worley

    Hi Storm’s Mom,

    I’m not Canadian, but certainly would consider it a compliment to be from Canada. I’m from the Great Commonwealth of Virginia, USA.

    Now on to the email. I looked at the bottom of the email from Jeremy J. Petersen, Executive Vice President, of Wild Calling! and there is a privacy notice. i thought there was after finishing the email the other day that such a clarification did exist.

    I respect Mr. Petersen’s request that the contents of his reply remain private. He will not mind one bit answering your questions. Matter of fact, I do believe he would be keen to answer them. Please do give him a chance. I’d simply direct your question to him personally. Should you decide to give it a go I promise not to ask what he said. LOL 😉

    It’s very rare that I post on these discussions, although, I do find them of interest. Right now, I must log off as I had my eyes checked yesterday evening and they are still bothering me. Ugh! I enjoyed chatting with you. Hope the Wild Calling! will work out great for Storm. Know my two GSD’s love it!!

    Take Care,

    Michelle

  • Storm’s Mom

    Hi Michelle,

    I’m Canadian (in BC, actually) so I totally understand your comment about privacy.. I’m guessing you are too, perhaps? The vast majority of posters on here are American, and many of them frequently post responses that they get from dog food companies because, I gather, the laws are quite a bit different there and those emails aren’t considered “private” …so to be honest I never thought twice about posting what I did or asking you what I did.

    I’ve actually been in touch with Wild Calling previously (I don’t think it was with Mr Petersen, but it could’ve been..it was a while ago), and I’ve found their customer service quite helpful as well.. I just hadn’t asked them the question you did, so I was curious about their response since you already had it and I’d have to email them again with the same question to get it..which seemed a bit silly/unnecessary.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Nope, but it wasn’t in my sent mail box, so I’m guessing it was a problem with the contact from rather than bad customer service. I’ve heard that calling them is more effective, but since Lily is on an elimination diet, I’m not really interested in samples at the moment.

  • Michelle Worley

    Storm’s Mom,

    Thank you for taking the time to post your reply to my comment. While I certainly understand your curiosity, as to the content of Jeremy J. Petersen’s email, I do believe that would be private. It would necessitate me writing him back to ask permission since the content of his email wasn’t directed to you. I took the initiative to write. I kindly and sincerely suggest that you write Mr. Petersen with whatever your thoughts, compliments or potential concerns might be regarding his young startup company and it’s products. I dare say that when you approach him in a professional manner that he will return his reply in kind.

    Best Regards,

    Michelle

  • BoxerBliss

    Did you ever hear back from Nature’s Logic? I emailed asking for samples about a month ago, still no reply.

  • Storm’s Mom

    Ok, but what was Mr Peterson’s answer to your question?? (perhaps posting it directly here would be best..)

    Don’t get me wrong, I’ve fed a couple of the Rocky Mountain Medley formulae, and am planning to keep the Elk one in my rotation as I think it’s a great, relatively unique protein-sourced food for my rotation ..I just found it odd that you said that he answered your question thoroughly and you “could not have been happier”, but you never said what that answer actually was.

  • Michelle Worley

    I emailed Wild Calling! and within the hour received a long detailed response about my concern regarding where their products were manufactured. Jeremy J. Petersen, Executive Vice President, of Wild Calling! answered my question thoroughly. I could not have been happier. I told Mr. Petersen that because of the great customer service my GSD’s would try his company’s product. I did not ask for samples. I bought a small back of the Wild Calling! Elk, Whitefish Meal and Turkey Meal. My big 9 month old GSD, Jake, sampled it out of my hand. Good. Now for the “dish test.” I’ve tried many kibbles with him and Liesel, my 5 month old female, that stayed in the bowl while they walked off. NOT Wild Calling! Elk, Whitefish Meal and Turkey Meal. Jake cleaned up the handfuls I placed in his dish without a second thought. Great!! Liesel loves to dunk her head in the kibble bags she does like…few and far between. I decided to place the opened bag on the floor. Yep, within seconds that GSD muzzle was dunked down munching away. LOL So, the moral of this post, don’t just ask for samples. Have a valid reason for writing the company about their product(s). I did. I purchased their product instead since they are a young startup company. I also know now where the food my GSD’s are eating comes from now. I know the manufacturing plants name. My dogs are happy and that’s priceless to me. Oh, I have not in any way been compensated for honestly writing this post. I will be buying a larger bag of the Wild Calling! Elk, Whitefish Meal and Turkey Meal in the near future.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Cool! I’ll put it on my “to try” list. 😀

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    I wouldn’t have bought this food since no one ever responded to my mail but i won a free small bag at my local pet store! Molly has been eating it for about two weeks now. She loves it! Out of all the foods that i have tried she has the smallest stool on this food. Nice shiny coat too. So in spite of everything it looks like this will be a keeper. I got the duck, salmon and lamb since she cannot have chicken or turkey. I have tried so many foods that just didn’t work so im so happy i have another one for my rotation.

  • Ryan

    Weird. I emailed them and got my samples within a week. My dog LOVED their elk formula. She’s not too fond of kibble, but she actually seemed happy eating this food.
    I mean, the food isn’t orijen, but it does have some unique proteins, and that’s awesome to me.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    You are welcome!

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Thanks! I just used the “contact us” form on their website, but maybe I should try emailing directly if possible.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    I remember i got my samples within a week. They were very prompt at answering my email requesting them too. From what i hear they usually have very good customer service. I would email them again.
    As far as the Wild Calling goes, it’s off my list to try. No response back from them at all. I even called them and left a message.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    The same thing happened to me with Nature’s Logic, I emailed them a week ago asking about samples and I haven’t heard back. I remember you said you had some NL samples. How soon did they get back to you when you tried NL? Or did you get the samples from a store?

  • theBCnut

    I have to agree. I don’t mind being told “No” or “We don’t do that” but I do expect to get a response of some kind.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    I emailed Wild Calling 4 days ago. I wanted to see if they had any samples before i went out and bought a bag. I haven’t heard back from them yet. That rubs me the wrong way. Even if they don’t have them they should respond! No excuse for bad customer service.

  • theBCnut

    Considering they are made by Evanger’s, having the lid not come off is probably a good thing. Evanger’s is known for putting the wrong thing in the can, under reporting fat content by a huge amount, leaving meat to rot in tractor trailers, having completely unsanitary facilities, stealing electricity, forcing their workers to work unpaid overtime, and who knows what else.

  • Doglover0719

    I recently just switched to this food and I read a lot on this discussion about the canned food. I bought a few cans and they’re poorly packaged and the lids of the can don’t pull off easy at all. What else are the issues with the canned food/manufacturing ?

  • Dana

    I’ve been feeding my dog Wild Calling dry and wet food ever since the
    EVO recall a few years ago. She loves it and does well with all the
    different flavors/ingredients. Note, too, that I occasionally switch
    her off to high-quality Orijen to keep her digestion balanced.

  • Doxie Mom

    I use Grandma Mae’s canned food. Its grain free and has gravy ribboned through it. I also like Dave’s grain free. But, I would try this food out. I have 3 dogs and they are all doing good on it. They have 3 styles that are mixed meats and 3 styles that are single meats. Mine really like the turkey but have ate all the flavors including the one with salmon. They usually dont like salmon.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    It’s on my list to try. I have so many i want to try but not all that i try agree with my girls.

  • Bobby dog

    I think their dry food looks good and I wanted to try it, but my pet store stopped carrying it. I contacted Wild Calling to let them know they should update their store locator. When they replied back to me they let me know that another pet store near by still sold their canned. I replied back letting them know as long as they used Evanger’s I wouldn’t feed their canned. Thank goodness there are a lot of pet foods on the market that don’t use Evanger’s.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    I need to do that too. If i see one at the pet store i always have to come home and look it up.

  • Bobby dog

    There are quite a few canneries for pet food companies to use. However, with Evanger’s history it still surprises me when I find what is IMO a decent brand using them. For this reason I have a spreadsheet to keep track of what Evanger’s cans.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    There are a lot of canned foods that i would like to feed, but when i check them out they are canned by Evangers. From what i have been told there are only a few canneries.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Whoa! I’m definitely not feeding their food. Thanks!

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom
  • Dog_Obsessed

    What is the problem with Evanger’s? And what other foods do they manufacture?

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    One of the pet stores that i go to just started selling it last week. I was there today and they told me they had already sold quite a few bags of it. Both of my dogs just seem to do better on a meat based kibble so i can’t wait to try this one.

  • theBCnut

    They actually use more than one cannery, but if the can isn’t labeled according to who canned that particular can, I wouldn’t buy any of them, just to make sure I don’t get one from Evanger’s.

  • Dori

    So Evanger’s makes their canned? YUK!!!!!!!!!

  • theBCnut

    No, Day 6 makes their dry foods.

  • Dori

    We’re they referring to the kibble and/ or canned? I didn’t think Day Six did caning of foods.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    Has anyone else used this recently? It looks like a really good food. I wouldn’t use the cans though since Evangers makes them.

  • Doxie Mom

    Ive been feeding this to my dogs for a few months now and my dogs love it. Nothing is sourced from China, no recalls. I feel good feeding it. My food store recommends it and says it is comparable to Orijen in that it is meat based.

  • Melissaandcrew

    Pea fiber most certainly is an ingredient and identified on labels as such.Scary that the company told you that.

  • Jän Thømas R.

    To those concerned:
    i have been told by their owners that the “dried peas” are actually just pea fiber, but that isn’t an official term allowed by AAFCO for labeling. it’s used instead of lower quality ingredients like tomato pomace or dried beet pulp, yet is misunderstood as a sneaky plant protein filler

  • Jän Thømas R.

    Dry food is confirmed to be made only at Day Six Pet Nutrition, near Kansas city. Evangers was manufacturing all the cans about a year ago when the cans first came out, but as of today they only produce about a third of the cans

  • Bobby dog

    Betsy,
    I was looking at the 2011 WDJ approved wet food list. They list Fromm’s canned food as “Made by Performance Pet Products, Mitchell, SD.” IDK if three years later Fromm’s still uses them, but it’s possible. PPP’s home page states they are “devoted to the production of human grade dog and cat food.” Haven’t found any mention of it being a USDA inpected cannery.
    http://www.performancepet.net/index.asp?lid=1

  • Bobby dog

    Thanks! I never think to check Facebook pages.

  • Storm’s Mom

    Looks like they answered/confirmed 3 days ago on their FB page

    https://www.facebook.com/WildCalling

    (right side, where it says “Recent Posts by Others on Wild Calling”)

    a Jess Henderson asked “Who makes this product for you?” and the response was:

    “Hi Jess,

    Day Six Pet Nutrition makes our dry foods.

    Best Regards,

    Jeremy J. Petersen
    Executive Vice President”

  • Bobby dog

    Hi Nectarmom:
    The last info I had on Wild Calling canned food was it was canned by Evanger’s; that was last fall. I was checking it out for Bobby. Did you speak to the company to confirm Day Six Pet Nutrition manufactures Wild Calling? I wouldn’t mind trying it out myself.

  • Bobby dog

    Thanks! If I manage to uncover anything, I’ll update you. 😉

  • Betsy Greer

    I’m still looking, but am only finding that same generic statement that it’s made at a USDA inspected facility in South Dakota.

    Not very transparent.

  • Storm’s Mom

    A new player in the game, interesting!! Appears they started up in 2013

    http://www.fourstateshomepage.com/story/day-six-pet-nutrition-tax-abatement/d/story/qKGqBMEtAUaI9wQBGCxbFA

  • Bobby dog

    Correct, Evangers is only a cannery (thank goodness?). I also find that interesting that they co-pack for Evanger’s.
    Do you happen to know the name of the cannery Fromm’s uses for their products in South Dakota? On their website they state it is a USDA inspected cannery.

  • Nectarmom

    Day Six Pet Nutrition makes the kibble. Don’t know about the canned as of yet.

  • Betsy Greer

    I believe I read that as well Ron, that Fromm manufactured Evanger’s kibbled diets. That’s a head scratcher ~ to think those two would be associated. I wonder who all Fromm co-packs for…

  • Ron

    Yes I think you are correct, upon further checking it seems the dry is manufactured by Ohio Pet.
    The site I looked at also said Fromm manufactures some of Evangers but I don’t believe that is correct at this time, anyways.

  • Betsy Greer

    I could be mistaken, but I thought Evanger’s only canned foods. I don’t believe they manufacture kibble. In fact, although this information is almost two years old, it looks as though Evanger’s kibble is made by Ohio pet.

  • Nectarmom

    I am going to call the Company and ask them where is this milled. My shih Tzu is super picky and has a Poultry intolerance so at the recommendation of a near by holistic store they recommended this food to me and my shih Tzu has been doing awesome on it and eating every meal but if it is milled at Evanger’s then we will be switching her to something else asap.

  • Ron

    I have read where the kibble is also manufactured at Evangers. But I have nothing to verify that other than some website information.

  • Storm’s Mom

    Opened up a small bag of the Elk, Whitefish Meal, and Turkey Meal tonight, and saw something I’ve never seen in a dog food bag before – a velcro fastener, where there is normally a ziplock or nothing! Interesting.. It’s about a quarter inch in height on this small bag (presumably/hopefully larger in larger bags) and honestly seems a little flimsy, so I’m thinking it’d be best to have a dog food container standing by when using this brand, as I’m not sure it would hold up to the opening and closing a couple times a day (although presumably/hopefully they tasted this, but still…). Anyway, Storm seemed to do well with his 1st meal of the Rocky Mountain Medley Elk, so fingers crossed it stays that way.