V-Dog (Dry)

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Rating: ★★½☆☆

V-Dog Dog Food receives the Advisor’s second-lowest tier rating of 2.5 stars.

The V-Dog product line includes one dry dog food, a recipe claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for adult maintenance.

V-Dog

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 26% | Fat = 10% | Carbs = 57%

Ingredients: Dried peas, brown rice, pea protein concentrate, oats, sorghum, lentils, canola oil, peanuts, sunflower hearts, potato protein, brewers dried yeast, alfalfa meal, flaxseeds, natural vegetable flavor, quinoa, millet, calcium carbonate, dicalcium phosphate, salt, potassium chloride, vegetable pomace (carrot, celery, beet, parsley, lettuce, watercress & spinach), taurine, vitamins (vitamin E supplement, niacin, d-calcium pantothenate, vitamin A supplement, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement, vitamin D2 supplement, riboflavin supplement, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid), choline chloride, minerals (zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, copper sulfate, manganous oxide, sodium selenite & calcium iodate), dl-methionine, l-lysine, l-carnitine, parsley flakes, l-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), dried cranberries, dried blueberries, preserved with citric acid and mixed tocopherols (form of vitamin E)

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 5.1%

Red items indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis24%9%NA
Dry Matter Basis26%10%57%
Calorie Weighted Basis24%22%53%
Protein = 24% | Fat = 22% | Carbs = 53%

The first ingredient in this dog food includes dried peas. Dried peas are a good source of carbohydrates. Plus they’re naturally rich in dietary fiber.

However, dried peas contain about 27% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the meat content of this dog food.

The second ingredient is brown rice, a complex carbohydrate that (once cooked) can be fairly easy to digest. However, aside from its natural energy content, rice is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The third ingredient is pea protein, what remains of a pea after removing the starchy part of the vegetable.

Even though it contains over 80% protein, this ingredient would be expected to have a lower biological value than meat.

And less costly plant-based products like this can notably boost the total protein reported on the label — a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The fourth ingredient lists oats. Oats are rich in B-vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber.

The fifth ingredient is sorghum. Sorghum (milo) is a starchy cereal grain with a nutrient profile similar to corn.

Since it is gluten-free and boasts a smoother blood sugar behavior than other grains, sorghum may be considered an acceptable non-meat ingredient.

The sixth ingredient includes lentils. Lentils are a quality source of carbohydrates. Plus (like all legumes) they’re rich in natural fiber.

However, lentils contain about 25% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The seventh ingredient is canola oil. Unfortunately, canola can be a controversial item. That’s because it can sometimes (but not always) be derived from genetically modified rapeseed.

Yet others cite the fact canola oil can be a significant source of essential omega-3 fatty acids.

In any case, plant-based oils like canola are less biologically available to a dog than fish oil as a source of quality omega-3 fats.

The eighth ingredient lists peanuts. Peanuts are not true nuts but rather legumes similar to beans and peas. They are rich in mono-saturated fats and dietary fiber.

The ninth ingredient includes sunflower hearts. Sunflower hearts consist of the hulled kernel of the whole seed. They are rich in omega-6 fatty oils, vitamins A and E as well as dietary fiber.

The tenth ingredient is potato protein, the dry residue remaining after removing the starchy part of a potato.

Even though it contains over 80% protein, this ingredient would be expected to have a lower biological value than meat.

And less costly plant-based products like this can notably boost the total protein reported on the label — a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With five notable exceptions

First, brewers yeast can be a controversial item. Although it’s a by-product of the beer making process, this ingredient is rich in minerals and other healthy nutrients.

Fans believe yeast repels fleas and supports the immune system.

Critics argue yeast ingredients can be linked to allergies. This may be true, but (like all allergies) only if your particular dog is allergic to the yeast itself.

In addition, a vocal minority insists yeast can increase the risk of developing the life-threatening condition known as bloat. However, this is a claim we’ve not been able to scientifically verify.

In any case, unless your dog is specifically allergic to it, yeast can still be considered a nutritious additive.

What’s more noteworthy here is that brewers yeast contains about 48% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

Next, we note the use of alfalfa meal. Although alfalfa meal is high in plant protein (about 18%) and fiber (25%), this hay-family item is more commonly associated with horse feeds.

In addition, we find vegetable pomace, the solid by-product of vegetables after pressing for juice or oil. This item contains the skins, pulp, seeds, and stems of the fruit.

Vegetable pomace can be a controversial ingredient. Some praise pomace for its high fiber, while others scorn it as an inexpensive pet food filler.

Just the same, there’s probably not enough vegetable pomace here to make much of a difference.

Next, we find no mention of probiotics, friendly bacteria applied to the surface of the kibble after processing to help with digestion.

And lastly, the minerals listed here do not appear to be chelated. And that can make them more difficult to absorb. Non-chelated minerals are usually associated with lower quality dog foods.

V-Dog Dog Food
The Bottom Line

V-Dog is by design a meatless product.

So, although we recognize the need for some dog owners to feed a meat-free diet, we also respect a dog’s natural carnivorous bias.

That said, and before we assign our final rating, it’s still important to compare the amount of plant-based protein present with other dog foods.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 26%, a fat level of 10% and estimated carbohydrates of about 57%.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 38%.

Near-average protein. Below-average fat. And above-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

Bottom line?

V-Dog is a meatless, plant-based dry dog food that uses peas and pea protein concentrate as its main sources of protein, thus earning the brand 2.5 stars.

Not recommended.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content and (when appropriate) their fat-to-protein ratios.

V-Dog Dog Food
Recall History

The following list (if present) includes all dog food recalls since 2009 directly related to this product line. If there are no recalls listed in this section, we have not yet reported any events.

You can view a complete list of all dog food recalls sorted by date. Or view the same list sorted alphabetically by brand.

To learn why our ratings have nothing to do with a product’s recall history, please visit our Dog Food Recalls FAQ page.

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A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

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Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

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Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

07/17/2016 Last Update

  • Amateria

    Pretty good actually, I do however have insulin resistance and a bit of ibs as I react to too much fat and other stuff, so most days I feel pretty good and than when I overdo it I feel less than stellar, unfortunately some things I just can’t quit eating because their simply too delicious to stop :p

    I’ve found a new gluten free vegetarian company I like which has organic natural mac and cheese which is awesome because the non natural one made me sick, also lasagne which tastes more like cannelloni but either way it’s awesome.
    She also has soups, I’ve only tried her split pea one but I wasn’t a fan too much salt.
    Also burritos that are expensive and quiet bland, didn’t really like it and it made my stomach feel heavy.

    I’m also only 56 kilos and 172cm, so not obese in fact I’m actually underweight supposedly, even though I literally eat stuff all day, but at least it’s pretty impossible for me to add any I usually loose some instead, because I apparantly have some left to loose haha silly body.

  • Garrett Christopher Ryan

    My comment goes out to anyone who actually believes that dogs on a vegan will not thrive and will waste away. My 5.5yr old Australian Shepherd has been vegan since she was 8 months old and before that on the “healthiest” (most expensive) kibbles and non gmo raw meats. I switched her to a vegan diet due to finding out about Bramble, the amount of dogs allergic to poultry, and for the ethical standpoint. I get her blood tested and labs done twice a year, never get her teeth cleaned, she is on NO flea or tick treatments, and the only supplements she receives is all the fruit and watermelon that she can eat. She runs over 20 miles per day, 3x a week with me while I ride dirt bikes. She swims against current and dock dives for 2+ hours everyday that we don’t ride. The vets always think that I’m pulling their leg when I tell them she’s 100% vegan and has been for 5 years. Most of them have been so interested they’ve told other patients about her and have given them my contact info. Her lab work has always came back as healthy as can be, she has no allergies, zero skin issues, zero coat issues, she’s had 1 tick in her entire life (and we regularly backpack in Idaho and eastern Oregon where there is an abundance of them) and flea control is managed by picking off any that we see. Her teeth are white as snow and she still has her puppy breath. If anyone wants to see what the muscular structure looks like check out the pics of her on my Instagram @garrett_c_ryan. Aside from all of that she is also a trained and active scent detection dog. And came from a bloodline that has major liver and cancer issues And rarely live past 4. So drop the heresay that dogs need meat.. And yes, if left to their own devices they will kill something and eat it.. They will also chase a car, their tail, or swallow their toys. They don’t need meat and neither do we. If you want to keep feeding dogs the same toxic crap you eat then that’s your choice, but get your facts straight when you try and knock something that isn’t traditional. How many obese, unhealthy people are on here that don’t believe that plant based is a better way? How’s your diet working out for you?

  • Garrett Christopher Ryan

    My comment goes out to anyone who actually believes that dogs on a vegan will not thrive and will waste away. My 5.5yr old Australian Shepherd has been vegan since she was 8 months old and before that on the “healthiest” (most expensive) kibbles and non gmo raw meats. I switched her to a vegan diet due to finding out about Bramble, the amount of dogs allergic to poultry, and for the ethical standpoint. I get her blood tested and labs done twice a year, never get her teeth cleaned, she is on no flea or tick medicine, and the only supplements she gets is all the fruit and watermelon that she wants. She runs over 20 miles a day, 3x a week with me while I ride dirt bikes, swims against current and dock dices for 2+ hours everyday that we don’t ride. The vets all think I’m pulling they’re leg when I tell them she’s 100% vegan and has been for 5 years. Labs always come back as healthy as can be, no allergies, no skin issues, 1 tick in her entire life (and we regularly backpack in Idaho and eastern Oregon where there are swarms of them) and flea control is manage by picking off any that we see. Teeth are white as day and she still has her puppy breath. If anyone wants to see what the muscular structure looks like check out the pics of her on my Instagram @garrett_c_ryan. Aside from all of that she is also a trained and active scent detection dog. So drop the heresay that dogs need meat.. And yes, if left to their own devices they will kill something eventually.. They will also chase a car, their tail, or swallow their toys. They don’t need meat and neither do we. If you want to keep feeding dogs the same toxic crap you eat then that’s your choice, but get your facts straight when you try and knock down something that isn’t traditional. How many obese, unhealthy people are on here knocking vegan vegetarian foods? Or are you all scientist that happen to be professional athletes on the top of your game?

  • Andrew Wills

    Obviously the author of the V-dog review know very little about plant based diets. I grew up in the deep woods country. Even coyotes eat a lot of plants in their diet. Every once in a great while you will find coyote scat with fur or bones. Most of the time just plant and seeds. Plant protein is highly absorbable and useable as it takes much less energy to digest. I could go on and on.
    The bottom line is this. My dog was riddled with health problems. He had arthritis, skin issues, and just felt bad most of the time. He was on a very expensive high quality meat based diet. I changed him to V-Dog and all problems are gone. All problems are gone!!!! He is 15 years old with sparkling eyes and loves to swim and hike all thanks to V-dog.

  • Pam Bacon

    FYI. There is no such thing as HUMANE slaughter. Just saying…

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