Purina One Beyond (Dry)

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Rating: ☆☆☆☆☆

PRODUCT HAS BEEN RENAMED
See “Purina Beyond” in
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Purina One Beyond Dog Food receives the Advisor’s mid-tier rating of 3.5 stars.

The Purina One Beyond product line includes two dry dog foods, each claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for adult maintenance.

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Purina One Beyond Ranch Raised Lamb and Whole Barley
  • Purina One Beyond White Meat Chicken and Whole Barley

Purina One Beyond White Meat Chicken and Whole Barley was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Purina One Beyond White Meat Chicken and Whole Barley

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 30% | Fat = 18% | Carbs = 44%

Ingredients: Chicken, brewers rice, whole barley, canola meal, chicken meal (natural source of glucosamine), beef fat preserved with mixed-tocopherols (form of vitamin E), natural liver flavor, dried egg product, salt, potassium chloride, dried carrots, calcium carbonate, vitamin E supplement, choline chloride, zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, manganese sulfate, niacin, vitamin A supplement, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, copper sulfate, riboflavin supplement, vitamin B12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, vitamin D3 supplement, calcium iodate, biotin, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of vitamin K activity), sodium selenite

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 4.5%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis26%16%NA
Dry Matter Basis30%18%44%
Calorie Weighted Basis25%38%38%

The first ingredient in this dog food is chicken. Although it is a quality item, raw chicken contains about 80% water. After cooking, most of that moisture is lost, reducing the meat content to just a fraction of its original weight.

After processing, this item would probably account for a smaller part of the total content of the finished product.

The second ingredient is brewers rice. Brewers rice is a cereal grain by-product consisting of the small fragments left over after milling whole rice. Aside from the caloric energy it contains, this item is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The third ingredient is barley. Barley is a starchy carbohydrate supplying fiber and other healthy nutrients. However, aside from its energy content, this cereal grain is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The fourth ingredient is canola meal, a by-product of canola oil production more typically used in farm animal feeds.

Although canola meal contains about 41% dry matter protein, this ingredient would be expected to have a lower biological value than meat.

And less costly plant-based products like this can notably boost the total protein reported on the label — a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

In addition, canola meal can be a controversial item. This appears to be related to the use of genetically modified rapeseed as its source material.

However, since not all canola has been genetically modified, it’s impossible for us to comment on the quality of this particular ingredient.

The fifth ingredient is chicken meal. Chicken meal is considered a meat concentrate and contains nearly 300% more protein than fresh chicken.

The sixth ingredient is beef fat. Beef fat (or tallow) is most likely obtained from rendering, a process similar to making soup in which the fat itself is skimmed from the surface of the liquid.

Although it may not sound very appetizing, beef fat is actually a quality ingredient.

After the natural liver flavor, we find dried egg product, a dehydrated form of shell-free eggs. Quality can vary significantly. Lower grade egg product can even come from commercial hatcheries — from eggs that have failed to hatch.

In any case, eggs are easy to digest and have an exceptionally high biological value.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With three notable exceptions

First, we find no mention of probiotics, friendly bacteria applied to the surface of the kibble after processing to help with digestion.

Next, the minerals listed here do not appear to be chelated. And that can make them more difficult to absorb. Non-chelated minerals are usually associated with lower quality dog foods.

And lastly, this food contains menadione, a controversial form of vitamin K linked to liver toxicity, allergies and the abnormal break-down of red blood cells.

Since vitamin K isn’t required by AAFCO in either of its dog food nutrient profiles, we question the use of this substance in any canine formulation.

Purina One Beyond Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Purina One Beyond looks like an above average dry product.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 30%, a fat level of 18% and estimated carbohydrates of about 44%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 30% and a mean fat level of 18%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 44% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 62%.

Near-average protein. Above-average fat. And below-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

When you consider the protein-boosting effect of the canola meal, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing a below average amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Purina One Beyond Dog Food is a plant-based kibble using a below average amount of chicken as its main source of animal protein, thus earning the brand 3.5 stars.

Recommended.

Those looking for a comparable wet food to go with this kibble may wish to visit our review of Purina One canned dog food.

Special Alert

Rice ingredients can sometimes contain arsenic. Until the US FDA establishes safe upper levels for arsenic content, pet owners may wish to limit the total amount of rice fed in a dog's daily diet.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

To learn how we support the cost of operating this website, please visit our public Disclosure and Disclaimer page.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

07/18/2014 Last Update

  • frabn

    Thanks Lore. PetSmart said they stopped receiving it, but I think I’ll check out Target based on your info, thank you.

    I had her go to Nutro Max for now and she’s responding well to it, plus it receives a higher rating, so I may just keep her on it a while, if not permanently.

  • Lore Preuss

    They rebranded and reformulated. There are now like 5 flavors in the new packaging (still chicken and lamb but now a turkey and two different fish flavors). Target now carries the whole product line

  • aquariangt

    it’s on the reviewer’s radar as a lot of people have brought it up, but #2 ingredient is still brewer’s rice, and canola meal isn’t far down. Mid 20s for protein %, I don’t see the rating going up much. Fancy new packaging though

  • cookiewins

    Hey so they recently updated the whole product line (packaging and ingredients)- any chance you can refresh the analysis to reflect this? I use the new version for my dog and she seems to like it, but since its available at target/walmart/etc I’m not sure how good the new version is. Any thoughts?

  • frabn

    Alissa I’m experiencing the same thing. My dog loves the lamb (and seems to have a chicken allergy) but the large bags are non-existent in most supermarkets. I’m even having trouble finding it at PetSmart locations now. I may have to switch her…I was looking to go more truly organic for her any way.

  • Storm’s Mom

    Awesome! NutriSource GF, Pure Balance GF and Victor GF are 3 really great value-priced options.

    Pure Balance can be picked up at Wal-Mart..

    Victor is quite a bit harder to find, but you can use their “Find a Dealer” search at http://www.victordogfood.com/

    Nutrisource’s locator search is here:

    http://www.klnfamilybrands.com/product-locator/

    Another one that I’ve heard is fairly reasonably priced elsewhere, but is quite expensive here, is Earthborn Holistic.

    I think Dr Tim’s is also quite reasonable, but I’m not 100% sure about that.

    There’s another one that keeps coming up on here as a good value-priced option, too..but I can’t recall what it is at the moment! Hopefully someone else will pipe up.

    Remember that with most high-quality grain-free foods, you will feed a less of it than you would Purina One Beyond, so while the price per bag may be more expensive than Purina, over the long run it’s actually cheaper.

    Hope that helps…

  • so where

    I’ll take the recommendations.

  • so where

    OK grain free isn’t the best description. What I’m saying is that this food food is one of the best options provided to consumers who aren’t looking to get into higher priced grain free/holistic options. If you buy dog food from Walmart or Kroger this is a great option, in my opinion of course.

  • Storm’s Mom

    Purina One Beyond is nowhere near “close to grain free” for any dog food brand. The first 2 ingredients of this food are, essentially, brewers rice and whole barley (the “chicken” is 70-80% moisture, which means there’s very little chicken left after processing, and thus the ingredient would fall far down the ingredient list if ingredients were required to be listed on an “as fed” basis). There are some pretty good value-priced *actual* grain-free foods… are you interested in recommendations? I’m glad your dog seems to be doing well on Purina One Beyond, but there are lots of better foods..at similar or cheaper prices.

  • so where

    I started this dry food for my havanese a year ago after leaving blue buffalo and wellness. He loves it, it’s cheap and comes close to grain free for a regular major dog food brand. It’s recently gotten a major design overhaul to male or look more holistic.

  • theBCnut

    Grains are not as common an allergen as say chicken or beef or a few other things and “grainfree” is one of those things that people tend to latch onto without knowing why, so that might be why he would make a statement like that. For that matter, true allergies are not very common either, but food intolerances and food hypersensitivities can also be to protein(slightly different reaction) and sometimes vets lump them all in the same category while other times they act like two don’t even exist, which can cause some strange misunderstandings too.

  • Tracey South

    to be honest I did think that is what the vet meant, that it was not grains. In fact I am pretty sure she said that. But you do make sense more, how you explain it so I am just going to say there is always room for more knowledge for me.

  • theBCnut

    Yes, that’s exactly right. It is a reaction to protein, even plant protein, which does not exclude grain, because grains have proteins in them too.
    I kind of think we may be talking two sides of the same argument and so we are close to understanding each other, but not quite. Sorry if I misunderstood what you were saying, but I read it as “grains can’t be the problem.” rather than people being too quick to jump on the grain free bandwagon.

  • Tracey South

    sorry if I mistook your meaning. this is the statement that I read. “It should be something that is a protein source, even if it is just a little plant protein, it can still be a culprit.” I had read the part that said even if it is just a little plant protein and thought it meant it’s a protein problem EVEN IF it comes from a plant. Truly , I apologize.

  • theBCnut

    I sure don’t know how you got that from my post. Plants have proteins and dogs can be allergic to ANY source of protein, plant or animal. I have two dogs that react to the proteins in grains. One of them also reacts to tomato and I’m beginning to suspect flaxseed. I did specifically state “even if it is just a little plant protein, it can still be a culprit.”

  • Tracey South

    you are probably the only person besides my vet that has agreed it is a protein source usually and not a grain source that causes the itching /allergies. *the only one I have come across that is.

  • Lisa Anne Balogh

    target has a new line of purina one beyond for dogs and cats, the packaging is different. I checked the ingredients and came here to see any analysis. Don’t know if the two products are actually the same, but with different packaging. Go to Target.com you can find it there or go to the store.

  • Alissa Algarin

    It looks like they are phasing out Purina One Beyond Lamb (which my dog loves) as it is getting harder to find and I can’t find the large bags anywhere. What would be a good substitute?

  • dgwlkr

    Also try looking on http://www.Petflow.com.

  • dgwlkr

    Thanks for sharing. I hadn’t heard about that.

  • dgwlkr

    I just purchased this Purina One Beyond dog food. Nice to know I’m not the only one that mixes food. I currently mixed this with Fromm Gold.

  • Bobby dog

    Thanks! I was wondering when the new recipes would be in the stores.

  • rej4sl

    Target had it the other night – the night before was a yellow bag and the price had gone up from $6.39 to $9.99 … we bought it tonight after exchanging the other one.

  • Bobby dog

    Where did you purchase this bag of POB?

  • rej4sl

    We have had our Juniper on Purina One beyond lamb for eons. Two days ago we got Purina One Smartblend. She refused to eat it. We too it back and got a refund.

    The new bag of beyond says Purina Beyond and is light green and says all natural food.
    We put it in her bowl and she ran over and munched it down. She loves the lamb flavor and just won’t eat anything else.
    She is a finicky eater so this acceptance of this food is awesome. It also says NO CORN WHEAT or Soy, NO Poultry by Product meal and NO added artificial colors, flavors or preservatives.
    And Lamb is the number one ingredient.

  • Bobby dog

    It looks like your’ll have some nice flavors to try out within the line for some variety!