Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance (Freeze-Dried)

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Rating: ★★★★★

Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance Dog Food receives the Advisor’s top rating of 5 stars.

The Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance product line lists four freeze dried dog foods, each claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for all life stages.

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance Goat
  • Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance Lamb
  • Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance Rabbit
  • Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance Chicken

Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance Rabbit was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Grandma Lucy's Pureformance Rabbit

Freeze-Dried Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 39% | Fat = 15% | Carbs = 38%

Ingredients: USDA Rabbit, chickpeas, flax, carrots, celery, apples, bananas, blueberries, cranberries, pumpkin, papaya, spinach, garlic, rosemary, vitamin A, vitamin D3, vitamin E, niacin, iron, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, riboflavin, thiamine, potassium, manganese, chloride, copper, magnesium, pyridoxine, cyanocobalamin

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 7.6%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis36%14%NA
Dry Matter Basis39%15%38%
Calorie Weighted Basis34%32%34%

The first ingredient in this dog food is rabbit. Rabbit is considered “the clean flesh derived from slaughtered rabbit” and associated with skeletal muscle or the muscle tissues of the tongue, diaphragm, heart, esophagus or other tissues accompanying the flesh.1

Rabbit is naturally rich in all ten essential amino acids required by a dog to sustain life.

The second ingredient is chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans. Like peas, bean and lentils, the chickpea is a nutritious member of the fiber-rich legume (or pulse) family of vegetables.

However, chickpeas contain about 22% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The third ingredient is flaxseed, one of the best plant sources of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Provided they’ve first been ground into a meal, flax seeds are also rich in soluble fiber.

However, flaxseed contains about 19% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The fourth ingredient is carrots. Carrots are rich in beta-carotene, minerals and dietary fiber.

The fifth ingredient is celery. Although raw celery can be very high in water, it can still contribute a notable amount of dietary fiber as well as other healthy nutrients.

The sixth ingredient is apple, a nutrient-rich fruit that’s also high in fiber.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With two notable exceptions

First, garlic can be a controversial item. Although most experts favor the ingredient for its numerous health benefits, garlic (in rare cases) has been linked to Heinz body anemia in dogs.2

However, the limited professional literature we surveyed provided no definitive warnings regarding the use of garlic — especially when used in small amounts (as it likely is here).

And lastly, the minerals listed here do not appear to be chelated. And that can make them more difficult to absorb. Non-chelated minerals are usually associated with lower quality dog foods.

Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance dog food looks like an above average product.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 39%, a fat level of 15% and estimated carbohydrates of about 38%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 38% and a mean fat level of 14%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 40% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 37%.

Above-average protein. Below-average fat. And below-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

Even when you consider the protein-boosting effects of the chickpeas and flax, this looks like the profile of a freeze dried food containing a significant amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance is a meat-based freeze dried dog food using a generous amount of named meats as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 5 stars.

Enthusiastically recommended.

Those looking for another freeze-dried product from the same company may wish to visit our review of Grandma Lucy’s Artisan Dog Food.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

To learn how we support the cost of operating this website, please visit our public Disclosure and Disclaimer page.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

11/02/2011 Original review
05/07/2013 Review updated
05/07/2013 Last Update

  1. Adapted by The Dog Food Advisor from the definition of meat published by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (2008)
  2. Yamato et al, Heinz Body hemolytic anemia with eccentrocytosis from ingestion of Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum) and garlic (Allium sativum) in a dog, Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association 41:68-73 (2005)
  • Melissaandcrew

    Just fed the Valor fish to everyone for their dinner. 4 would NOT eat it-three of them tried it, literally spit it out and gave me a dirty look like I was trying to pass off sawdust or something. These ones LOVE the GL chicken pureformance. The two that disliked the chicken, ate the fish, so go figure. This one had way less garlic odor then the chicken. It also seemed pasty to me, but that could have been me mixing it. Can’t wait to see how they “process” it, lol.

  • Caroline Capobianco

    I tried Pureformance over a year ago and my dog wouldn’t eat it. I tried it again this past weekend and he loves it! I’ve noticed that he eats a lot of things now that he never used to since he has been on raw. I want to try the Valor next.

  • Ava Lu

    Hi Aimee, yes it is a direct quote from them. I am not very happy with the food. My little dog has way too much stool from it. It does have more fiber than the other food she eats which is Stella and Chewy’s Freeze Dried food. I wanted to rotate her food and I was hoping this would be a good one. It doesn’t seem to be a good one for my little girl though.

  • aimee

    Is this a direct quote from them? If so it is quite concerning.

  • Ava Lu

    I started my Dachshund on the Turkey Valor about a week ago. I noticed she had more stools. She didn’t have soft stools, just more. I wrote to Grandma Lucy’s a few days ago because I was afraid she wasn’t absorbing the food well since the minerals are not chelated. I got a response today. Here it is…

    Tracey

    Thank you for reaching out to us.

    We often receive this question about the results of our foods and the stools from the dog. The simplest way to explain this is that the food when mixed with the water becomes a softer product with low fat. Fat is what can bind the stool and make it hard and compact. Our ingredients tend to have more hydration resulting in stools are softer with more volume.

    Our vitamins are non-chelated. Our research shows that because a dog’s digestive track is short, the difference between chelated and non-chelated vitamins does not have an impact on the absorption of the nutrients.

  • Melissaandcrew

    I just ordered a bag of the Fish Valor to try. Has anyone tried the Valor line yet, and if so, impressions?

  • Boston Belle

    Okay,dinner was mainly HK,because they’re used to it,and a small amount of pre-soaked(all nite…..21 hours,actually) Sojos, with the turkey I’ve been working with. HK and Sojos had been put thru the blender first. EVEN after soaking,and blendered,I STILL picked some “sticks” out of HK! Unbelievable!

  • Freeholdhound

    Thanks Betsy- luv to have options ;)

  • Boston Belle

    Thanks! That might be just enuf to do the trick!

  • Shawna

    I’ll have to try that with the food processor. Even with it I have to add a little water to get it to grind everything well.

    Edit — or maybe I just need to have the blades sharpened?

  • theBCnut

    I use the blender on things like that before all the water has been absorbed, then quickly pour it into another container to finish rehydrating.

  • theBCnut

    The blender should work, especially if the food has started to soften. I’ve used my blender for things like that a lot. Try the blender on the HK too. You have to make a little more than you need to feed since some of it is lost to the blender, but otherwise it is a great solution.

  • Shawna

    The Sojo’s premix has pieces just as large as the complete and balanced Sojo’s line last I used any. Things may have changed since then. I’m not a huge fan of the Sojo’s complete meals.

    Blender — some of the higher horse power, high quality blade blenders would likely do a nice job. The less expensive ones would probably be fine if doing small amounts at a time and possibly needing to have a little extra water added to them. I’d be afraid that the heat generated from the blender, if blending too long, would heat the ingredients possibly causing some nutrient loss. Hence the reasoning for small/er batches.

  • Boston Belle

    Thank you! I’ll check them out!

  • Boston Belle

    I’ll try again….maybe my setting wasn’t “public”!

  • Boston Belle

    So,does the premix have bigger pieces than the Sojos with meat already in them? I WAS actually thinking about using my blender on it! Would that work,or would I need a food processor?

  • Dori

    I don’t see the pics. Can you try posting the pics again. Thanks.

  • Shawna

    HK Preference works for all eight of my dogs (including the 18 year old) but I do soak it overnight or for at least eight hours.

    Sojo’s premix also works for us but I have to soak it for at least eight hours AND run it through the food processor for it to be digested well.

    Another that I think you’ll be happy with when it comes to digestion is Steve Brown’s Dinner Mix. It is whole foods in powder form that is added to a pound of meat. The mix is not expensive and you can add fruits and veggies you prepare to “bulk” it up a bit. However, you still have to prepare and pulp your own veggies for proper digestion. The nice thing about that though — if they aren’t digested you know your pups are still getting proper balance from the meat/dinner mix.

    Edit — here’s the link to Steve’s Dinner Mix http://www.seespotlivelonger.com/home/sll/page_40_1/see_spot_live_longer_homemade_dinner_mixes.html

  • Betsy Greer

    Hi Freeholdhound!

    I’ve been using Swanson’s BioCore. The difference was like night & day for Sam! From what I understand, they’re a full spectrum enzyme that contain the necessary enzyme to digest the sugar from certain grains and veggies.

    http://www.swansonvitamins.com/swanson-ultra-biocore-optimum-complete-ultimate-full-spectrum-enzymes-90-veg-caps

  • Freeholdhound

    Which enzyme are you using? I’ve been using Swanson’s DE & he seems good with it- but changing things up is always good.

  • Betsy Greer

    Hi BC!

    It appears to be fish, possibly garlic, possibly chickpeas and lentils and possibly foods that contain a lot of fruits and veggies. Oh, and probably some grains.

    Although, with this new digestive enzyme, I’m tempted to revisit some of those that he developed a gunky ear on that may have been the result of fruits and veggies; and possibly those that contained the gas producing legumes, but had no other triggers. I never kept him on the gas producing stuff long enough to see what happened to his ear.

    I’m also tempted to look for a “clean” food that does contain a fish product, line Natural Planet Organics, Now Fresh or Farmina.

    He does a little better on foods that aren’t too high in fat.

    I have in my mind that I really want to try Wellness Core Large Breed next. It’s fish free, no chickpeas or lentils and has fruits and veggies. Even on the NVI LID Duck, he’s still doing and some occasional ear flapping and face rubbing, though his ear is clear.

    Maybe I’m expecting too much. I feel like there’s something he should do great on with no reaction at all. Maybe Arabella has me spoiled since she can eat practically anything.

    I cringe at the thought of how much I’ve spent on dog food in the not yet two years since I brought him home.

    Any suggestions are much appreciated!

  • theBCnut

    Hi Betsy
    Refresh my memory. Besides no fish in any form, what else can Sam not have?

  • theBCnut

    Your pictures didn’t show up. Can you try to repost them? I’m very interested.

  • Betsy Greer

    I can relate! I officially have one food that my Sam can eat. One. He’s currently on NVI LID Duck and, so far, he’s doing pretty well on it. And, I’ve tried a lot of foods for him. A lot.

    I did find a particular digestive enzyme that worked amazingly well for him, so I’m feeling like there are now others I’d be willing to try.

  • Boston Belle

    We got some Sojo’s and I started soaking it……in this pic,it’s on the right,and carrots from two portions of GL on the left. I’m scared to even GIVE the Sojos. Looks like a whole pile of stuff to throw up! Don’t know what else to,give for breakfast, except HK,and just pick,pick,pick the stems out. She wasn’t regurging that,at least. This is a nightmare!

  • Boston Belle

    Thank you!

  • Freeholdhound

    I feel your pain. Harry can’t have 90% of what’s on the shelves. I found the “one” with Natures Logic & can now add in some raw, GL, and Earthborn Holistic. Good luck

  • Ron

    Essex Cottage Farms makes several pre-mixes that are supposedly deigned for certain conditions.
    I have no experience with their products but have seen a few good reviews.
    I think they make a Gastro, Allergy and a special kidney diet plus their original.

  • Boston Belle

    I’ll check it out! As much as I wish I COULD rotate foods.right now I’m trying to find just ONE that this one girl of mine can handle!LOL! I obviously end to know more about the ingredients other than the meat,veggies,and fruit that make the food really “balanced”. Still back at the drawing board! NO HK,for sure…..thinking of trying Sojos base mix,and adding my own meat…..that WAS working,with HK,until we got a new box that had all the old junk in it!

  • Freeholdhound

    Since I use GL in rotation with other foods & as a topper occasionally I’m not going to freak out. I think the post is under the Honest Kitchen thread

  • Boston Belle

    Someone has noticed the phosphorus level is very low……I’m not well informed on this at all…any ideas?

  • Freeholdhound

    I ordered a 10 lb bag go the GL Pureformance Goat from Doggiefood. Com. Had a great 1st time order price & free shipping. Too bad it took almost a month to receive the order. Website said it was being “packed” for over 2 weeks & they never responded to emails. Just as I was about to dispute the payment with PayPal the box showed up. Great food – lousy supplier. Lesson learned.

  • Freeholdhound

    Just tried out the Rabbit Formula – Good Lord Harry pounced on it & looked for more. Now I’ll wait & see how he handles it.

  • Linda Wunschel

    Thank you Rachel, and all for your replies. I did try it. No luck. It is now 2 months later; perhaps she’ll like it this time. I have found, much to my dismay, she really doesn’t like raw! She will eat beef hearts raw and chicken drumsticks and green beef tripe. So maybe I’ll stick to those, lightly cook other things, and supplement with natural vitamins/minerals and Brothers Complete.

    Subject: Re: New comment posted on Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance (Freeze-Dried)

  • Rachel Carr

    This is the first thing my 8 month old Golden has really been into! Hope the same goes for yours. She eats the Rabbit Pureformance recipe. Just watch for meat content. My concern with this good is the lack of meat chucks. My first bag only had about 15 chunks in a 10 lb bag, but there may have been smaller chunks I didn’t see. I often supplement with very little dry food or a raw bone and cut down on the suggested serving size of GL to make up the difference. Hopefully it was just my first bag and your will not have this issue. Good luck on your food journey!

  • Lori J.

    I meant to say The Pre-Mix”

  • Lori J.

    I’ve been feeding THK for years to both my dogs….NO loose stools here.

  • Lori J.

    I’m starting to wean my Aussie mix onto GL with added fish (as only protein)…Was feeding HK Zeal, but it has eggs and trying to figure out protein allergies….With GL, you want a caloric goal (hers is about 600) per meal, right? (when figuring how much protein to add, as all proteins have different caloric values).

  • 2iceblest

    Thank you for the clarification! My parents bred English bulldogs and I remembered that a little garlic was good! But, learned that cottage cheese for medium/large breed puppies is not good.
    Thank you, again!

  • InkedMarie

    My two who ate it loved it!

  • Linda Wunschel

    Thanks, Dave’s Hounds for replying. Have your dogs ever been very picky (selective) in what they eat?

  • Dave’s Hounds

    my dogs love it – I have been feeding rabbit and goat

  • Linda Wunschel

    How is the palatability of the pureformance, in general? I’ve spent, literally, hundreds of $ trying to get my 7 mo. old golden retriever to eat anything. I try to feed raw. She won’t eat Honest Kitchen.

  • Linda Wunschel

    Hi, Scarlett’s Mom! Please be sure to check the sodium content on the canned chicken. Also, the canned chicken *may be* from China. A lot of chicken these days is from there. I’m *not* suggesting that this is the cause of UTI or anal. But high sodium, as you probably are aware, is not good for pups or us!

  • Crazy4dogs

    I use the premix pureformance and just love this food in my rotation. My dogs get it 2-3 meals per week. I use a variety of meats and this allows me to vary their diet even more. It rehydrates quickly and I add the meat that I lightly cook. My dogs go crazy for this. It smells like food that I would eat and I have no problem with the garlic as dogs can and some say should have some garlic in their diet. It is also a very economical way to add fresh food to my dogs diet!

  • Spirit’s Mom

    I fed to my dog for over 3 months due to pancreatitis and liver enzyme levels. A complete blood check showed all levels normal but then her urine showed up with a high pH that never occurred before. I wonder if the plant content makes it less acidic. My vet told me to give Ester C 500mg twice a day for one month and then recheck.

  • Shawna

    Hi Barbara :)

    There’s a few things about the article that I don’t like. First is the sentence “A raw diet for dogs is a diet consisting only of uncooked fruits, vegetables, legumes, and meat.”

    1. Feeding uncooked legumes is dangerous. Legumes MUST be soaked over night, water drained off and then cooked.

    2. I don’t think a “species appropriate” diet should ever include legumes (or grains or excessive amounts of any carbs).

    3. Legumes (as well as other foods like grains) have “anti-nutrients” and enzyme inhibitors. They prevent the digestion and/or absorption of nutrients (like protein, zinc, calcium etc). I would never add these foods to a home prepared diet that didn’t compensate for the nutrient loss by adding more of those nutrients (which is what kibble manufacturers do (or so I’ve read)).

    The author writes “Bone-in meat is fed in the mornings and a special mixed patty is fed in the evenings.” I’ll have to see if I can find the data but Beth Taylor (co-authored “Dr. Becker’s Real Food….” book) commented in an email that that was not a good idea.. Nutrients work together in the body etc. I’ll see if I can find it.

    “Cooked fat is also dangerous for dogs and can give them pancreatitis” I don’t think that has ever been proven. Rancid fats would be more of a concern for me than simply cooked fats.

    “When choosing ground meat, I go for the cheapest. This means getting the meat with the highest fat content. With dogs, this is a good thing.” Ummm no, not unless you have a very active dog. Protein should be the predominant macronutrient in the diet. If too much fat is fed you could run the risk on not getting enough protein and other nutrients from the diet, without causing obesity at least.
    Additionally, if using “cheap” meats you will most definitely be purchasing feedlot beef and other confined animal sources. These meats are higher in omega 6 fatty acids potentially causing inflammatory issues. Not to mention that the fat is where all the toxins are stored…… :( Higher fat meats could potentially contain more toxins than leaner meats.
    I have some other issues with the article as I think the author is too broad and feeding this diet could lead to some health issues.
    In my opinion, one would be much better off working with a nutritionist (Dr. Susan Wynn was recommended by a poster a few days back), or using a recipe book like Dr. Karen Becker’s or following several different recipes that have been checked for balance (like Hound Dog Mom’s – which can be found in the forums here on DFA).
    Dr. Becker writes — a balanced raw diet is the best option for feeding your dog. An unbalanced raw diet is the worst option (even worse than grocery store kibble)…

  • Barbara

    Thanks Shawna. I found this on preparing my own dog food and had a couple of surprises/red flags. Would love your opinion.
    http://voices.yahoo.com/how-feed-dog-raw-food-diet-budget-679495.html?cat=22
    Of course some type of nutritional product is needed so if you can recommend any Fluffy and I would appreciate it.

  • Shawna

    Excellent article but I disagree with his stance on garlic and cats. Holistic vets have been recommending garlic for cats for a long time.

    Dr. Karen Becker “Fresh garlic can be given to dogs and cats to prevent internal as well as external parasites. Work with your vet to determine a safe amount for your pet’s body weight.” http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2010/03/31/dangers-of-flea-and-tick-problems.aspx

    Dr. Shawn “As a general guideline, 1 clove of garlic per 10 pounds of body weight for dogs (and 1/2 clove per cat) can usually be fed safely each day if the pet is not anemic.” http://www.petcarenaturally.com/ask-dr-shawn/supplements.php

    Dr. Pollen “The safe dose of garlic for healthy cats is a slice of garlic clove 2-3 times a week. Although this safe garlic dose is not enough to deworm a pet or cure a viral disease, it probably stimulates the immune system just enough to be a blessing.” http://drpollen.blogspot.com/2009/10/is-garlic-safe-for-cats-and-dogs.html
    Just another point of view… :)

  • Barbara

    Fact from Fiction: Garlic is safe ONLY for dogs (never cats)
    Testing Garlic in Pet Food
    http://us.petvalu.com/health-nutrition/dr-dave/articles/understanding-garlic
    Although it is very rare to find cases of garlic toxicity in cats because they are finicky about what they eat, research looking at the damage to red blood cells in cats after feeding garlic showed cats are sensitive to garlic. For this reason, the use of garlic in cat foods was discontinued in the early 1990s.

    It was not until the late 1990s that research was done on the effect of garlic on dogs. In 2000 a research paper was published which tested a garlic extract on dogs. The dogs did not show any observable toxicity symptoms, but there was a definite effect on the red blood cells. In the conclusions the researchers stated: “we believe that foods containing garlic should be avoided for use in dogs.” This led to a flurry of warnings and panic that garlic should also be removed from dog foods. The problem with the researchers’ statement (and many of the subsequent quotations of the study) is that they did not consider the relevance of the level of garlic extract used in the experiment, compared to the level included in dog foods.

    In their research they fed a garlic extract equivalent to 60 g of garlic to dog weighing approximately 12 kg. A 12 kg dog will normally eat between 150 to 200 g of food. Therefore, if the food was about 30% garlic the researchers’ concerns would be valid.

    The Reality of Garlic in Dog Food

    When garlic is added for flavor, the maximum usage level is around 3 g per kilogram of food. Our 12 kg dog eating 200 g of food would eat approximately 0.6 g per day. To achieve the health benefits of garlic, the usage level is around 1.5 g of garlic per kilogram of food. A 12 kg dog would eat about 0.3 g a day. It is very apparent that these levels are nowhere close to the levels used in their experiment, and at these levels research had not shown any effect of garlic on red blood cells. The confusion comes from not considering the dosage rate.

    Dosage

    Question: What is the difference between a nutrient, a drug, and a toxin? Answer: Dosage.

    That is an old saying among nutritionists, and it’s true. To say something is toxic without some reference to the level needed to cause the toxic effect is misleading, especially in the fields of nutrition and health.

    Lots of nutrients we, and our pets, consume are potentially toxic. An example is the trace mineral selenium. Selenium is usually added to pet foods at the level of 0.2 ppm (parts per million). Increase that level to 1 ppm you get additional health benefits. Increase it to 10 ppm and the level becomes toxic, possibly even deadly.

    Another example of where confusion is caused by talking about toxicity without considering dosage rate is Poinsettias. “Poinsettias are toxic; don’t let your dog near them.” Not true.

    Chocolate is another example. Chocolate can be deadly to dogs in high dosages, especially highly-potent chocolate such as unsweetened baker’s chocolate or cocoa powder. If your Labrador steals a single milk chocolate off the table, it will likely suffer no ill effects. If your Teacup Poodle eats a whole box of dark chocolate, she should visit the veterinarian immediately.

    The list of potentially toxic items could go on and on. I could include nutrients like salt, vitamin D, or Zinc. You name it, and it could be toxic at some level.

    Garlic is Healthy

    Garlic is added to dog foods because it has many health benefits, even at the very low levels used. Its main benefit is improvement to the health of the digestive tract. The other medicinal properties of garlic include: anti-microbial, antioxidant, antibiotic, fights cancer cells, decreases blood cholesterol, helps to prevent strokes and decreases blood pressure.

    In fact, most of the research into the effect of feeding garlic to dogs is done because the researchers want to better understand the benefits of garlic, not the dangers.

    Be assured that garlic is safe at the level used in dog foods, and remember that talking about toxicity without putting in some context of a “normal” consumption level is misleading.

  • Scarlett’s Mom

    I have been feeding GL Pureformance pre mix to which I add cooked canned chicken. Our girl has been having UTI and anal infections. Has anyone else experienced these problems?

  • Dave’s Hounds

    I have been feeding my dogs Goat – and they love it – they also love the rabbit.

  • Pattyvaughn

    I shove something into the little hole so the other stuff doesn’t leak out all over the place, then fill how ever I can(that usually means a spoon and a mess), and prop it up in a yogurt cup in the freezer. Some Kong fillings go in a ziplock bag and I cut off a corner and pretend I’m frosting a cake, not nearly as messy. Sometimes I partly fill the Kong with dry stuff and then add warm water, let it sit for however long is necessary, then freeze.

  • InkedMarie

    Ha, you don’t. When I fill Kongs with The Honest Kitchen, I make it thicker than I normally would for a meal and use the back of a spoon or knife, depending on who’s Kong it is. Throw it in the freezer then.

  • jolieqe

    The kong stuffing idea – how do you folks keep it from making a wet mess?

  • InkedMarie

    I use THK for a Kong stuffer. I had never thought of it til someone said that on the THK fb page. PB tends to go thru my dogs so this works better. I usually use it when we’re gone for the day and someone comes to let them out, it’s their meal.

  • Hound Dog Mom

    They have the large sized kongs and I completely fill the entire thing (takes about 1/3 C. GL with just enough water to make a paste). Their kongs are always completely empty, I never have anything stuck in there. I know at the shelter we give the dogs kongs with PB when we close for the night and they’re a pain in the butt to clean out the next day, there’s so much stuck in the top. I’m not sure if it’s the peanut butter that’s the problem or if my crew is just really good at getting all the food out!

  • Melissaandcrew

    Thanks HDM. I will have to give them a try as well. When you stuff the kongs how full do you stuff them? When I stuff them too full my crew seems to leave small bits stuck to the sides and its a witch to clean them. Maybe the GL works better than the peanut butter..

  • Hound Dog Mom

    I liked both. I just finished off a bag of the Pureformance Lamb last week and my crew is now getting the Artisan Bison in their kongs. If it were a larger component of their diet I would probably use the Pureformance more often because most of the formulas are higher in protein (I don’t really care much about the white potato vs. white potato free but I do care about protein). Although I have to say the Artisan Pork formula is great – 39% protein!

  • Melissaandcrew

    How do you like the artisan compared to the pureformance? I have not tried that line yet..

  • Hound Dog Mom

    You can order samples directly from Grandma Lucy’s on their website.

  • SanDnMila

    Where did you order the samples from? I would like to try rabbit with Mila she hasn’t had it before, she’s had the the chicken and loved it. I too enjoy the garlic smell. :)

  • http://www.dfwpugs.com/ sandy

    The meat is cooked before freeze drying per GL customer service.

  • http://pinterest.com/sammimaon/makana-s-mama-dog-collars/ Makana’s Mama

    Why is Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance Freeze Dried not under the Raw category? Just wondering.

  • aimee

    Hi Cate,

    One of the concern I have with feeding small dogs a diet of this type, especially during growth is if the distribution of the vitamins/minerals throughout the mix is even. I fear they may settle out.

    I know of a case of a sheltie on such a diet who was diagnosed with calcium deficiency and had neurologic signs thought to be from collapse of the vertebrate. ( If I’m remembering that right).

    While a larger breed would go through a bag rather quickly, making an uneven distribution of minerals etc. less of a problem, I have concerns in a small dog such as yours. JMO

  • Pattyvaughn

    It’s an All Life Stages food so it is fine for a puppy.

  • Cait

    Hi there,

    I see that this line is tagged with “puppy”, but the branding itself doesn’t mention puppy. Is this fit for a 6 month old 15lb puppy?
    Thanks!
    Caitlin

  • Dave’s Hounds

    I use the rabbit and my dogs love it. This is an excellent food.

  • InkedMarie

    I agree with you. I have the PureFormance Chicken here and I think it smells like chicken soup; my son said it smells gross. I didn’t like it for Gemma because it’s so thick with big chunks and no teeth for her.

  • Hound Dog Mom

    Ordered samples of each of the Grandma Lucy’s Artisan and Pureformance foods. This was my first time trying GL – I believe it’s the only mainstream dehydrated food I haven’t tried. I really liked it – or rather, the dogs did. I’ve heard a lot of people complain about a strong garlic scent both here on DFA and on product reviews on shopping sites. I have to say I didn’t find the garlic smell overwhelming at all, in fact I liked the smell of the product (almost smelled like real food!). Works great for making kong-sicles – I might start using this exclusively instead of kibble/pumpkin. I just ordered a 3 lb. bag of the Artisan Bison and a 3 lb. bag of the Pureformance Goat. I’d also like to say it’s very reasonably priced in comparison to the other dehydrated foods. My dogs give Grandma Lucy’s the paws up.

  • Pattyvaughn

    I’ve always read that chelated minerals are better utilized than non chelated, but I recently read an article stating that that statement is presumed but not proven. A whole foods supplement may be beneficial, but an ordinary vitamin would just be more of the same.

  • 0ojoyo0

    I’ve been feeding Pureformance to my dog for a while, after switching from Artisan. My 12 lb., 3.5 year old chihuahua / rat terrier mix licks her bowl clean every time. I was wondering, however, since the minerals are not chelated, should I suppliment her diet with a multi-vitamin or probiotic? Trying to do the best for my dog, but all the information out there is overwhelming. Thanks :)

  • Hound Dog Mom

    Oh neat there’s also a new “Goat” variety of the Pureformance. I haven’t tried GL yet but now I want to, might have to order some samples.

  • Hound Dog Mom

    Hi Kimgains –

    I feed my dogs a barf-style diet as well. And yes – in order to be digested most efficiently vegetables need to be cooked and pureed/mashed. Dogs don’t produce the enzyme cellulase needed to break down the vegetables – cooking and pureeing in a sense “pre-digests” the veggies. I’ve never fed my dogs Grandma Lucy’s, but I have fed other dehydrated foods and pre-mixes and I find that the stools are much larger and more frequent. On some foods I’ve even seen whole undigested chunks of veggie come out in the stool.

  • Kimgains

    I’ve been feeding BARF for 11 years to my dogs.  I was always under the impression that you had to pulverize the vegetables to break down the cell wall so the dogs could digest them.  Grandma Lucy’s food looks like the vegetables were dehydrated whole.  Are dogs able to digest this?  Thanks for any help.

  • lovemy4dogs

    Thanks, I didn’t know Zeal was flax free, makes total sense though.  I’ll have to give it a try.

  • Hound Dog Mom

    Lovemy4dogs –

    It’s definitely a possibility that your dog has a sensitivity to flax. To be sure you may want to try a few more flax-free foods, if they work like the Thrive did then that’s probably the issue. THK’s Zeal is grain-free and flax-free.

  • Lovemy4dogs

    I feed Grandma Lucy’s PureFormance to my 3 out of 4 dogs. Every time I tried feeding this to my puggle he would throw up within about a half hour, no matter how little I used.  The same thing happened when I tried THK.  I’ve noticed that all of these foods have flax in them.  Do you think that could be the problem?  When I fed him THK’s Thrive (which does not have flax in, but it is also NOT grain free) he did fine on it.  I would like to feed him grain free but if Thrive is the only one he can handle I guess I will have to stick with that.  

  • Dave’s Hounds

    I have been trying this in place of canned in evening but I always add fresh meat with pumpkin, yogurt and digestive enzymes. My dogs have not had loose stool but they do go more. 

  • Jolieqe

    Thanks all. I did notice it’s double the fiber as dry kibble so it’s expected. The anal gland odor thing sucks – you would think more poop means less problems lol. Maybe her poops will firm up soon and the glands will go away…

  • InkedMarie

    HDM is correct about the stools. Mine love it so much so we will probably always feed it in our rotation

  • http://petfinder.com/ dugitup – I adopted

    HDM 

    I have noticed this too.  I think the loose stool is at least partially related to the meat content of the food. I have noticed that as meat content goes up the stools become smaller and firmer.

  • Hound Dog Mom

    My theory for why this occurs is that the fruits and veggies may be in too large of pieces. Dogs don’t produce the enzyme to digest cellulose and I know that in order to best utilize fruits and veggies they need to be cooked and pureed. With the homemade raw diet I feed now if if I get lazy and feed chopped veggies or use a dehydrated premix (like Sojo’s or THK) the stools and noticeably larger.

  • Hound Dog Mom

    Jolieqe –

    One of the downsides of dehydrated foods (like Grandma Lucy’s, The Honest Kitchen, Sojo’s, etc.) are that dogs tend to eliminate quite a bit more and their stools are a bit looser. I know I had this same issue when I fed The Honest Kitchen and many others have posted that they’ve had the same issue as well. My dogs were eliminating about 4 times a day on THK, they eliminated 2 times a day on high quality kibble, and they now eliminate 1 time a day on raw.

  • Jolieqe

    Poop question – my dog is up to 1.5c a day of Pureformance chicken (transitioning up to 2.5 cup for her size). Her poop is solid but has some moisture to it (not dry logs). The past couple of days I’ve noticed the anal gland smell. Wondering if this could be caused by the food… maybe the poops aren’t hard enough to help express the glands?  Also, she has about 40% more poop than when on just kibble, is this normal?

  • melissa

    I use it as a change of pace for my crew by mixing it in as a topper. They go crazy for it. On occasion, I give them 50-50 with kibble and no issues with the stomachs etc.

  • Chinese Crested mom

     Thank you :) I was also trying to figure out cost.  We have a new baby on the way, so I guess we won’t be able to afford a full switch over for the time being.  I may just use it as a topper every now and then.  They are on EVO herring and salmon right now and they are doing great and they love it!  I was just really interested in the dehydrated as well!

  • melissa

     Chinese crested-

    If you look at the smaller bag of GL, dogs(average activity) from 10-20lbs get 2/3 to 1 cup per day. In the small bag, there are 15 cups- If you plan on the high side until you see how much they need(1 cup each per day) you will be using 3 cups per day, 15 cups per 5 days-which would be one small(3lb ) bag per 5 days-x6 for one month- $30(in my area)x6 would be $180 per MONTH.

    If your crew only needs 1/2(the senior feeding amount minimum) 1.5per day, it would last 10 days, 3 bags per month=$90 The large bag would probably be a bit cheaper, but either way you slice it, it will be more(quite a bit more) than the kibble.

  • Chinese Crested mom

     Thank you so much! This is exactly the info I needed.  :)  I was a little confused with it all haha

  • Hound Dog Mom

    Chinese Crested Mom –

    When feeding dehydrated you add the water after feeding the recommended amount. So, for example, if the bag says your dog should eat 1/2 C. per day you measure 1/2 C. dry then add the water. A 10 lbs. bag of Grandma Lucy’s has 51 cups and a 28 lb. bag of kibble has (roughly) 110 C. Grandma Lucy’s is approximately 1 1/2 times more calorie dense than kibble so if you were going through a 28 lb. bag of kibble every 2 months you’d probably needs about 1 1/2 bags of Grandma Lucy’s every 2 months. All rough estimates obviously.

  • Chinese Crested mom

    Hello all, I am really wanting to switch my 3 small dogs (under 14 pounds)  from their quality kibble to Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance.  I have a few questions though.  Right now, they go through a $63, 28 pound bag of kibble in almost 2 months.  So I was wondering, how long do you think it would take them to go through the 10 pound bag (51 pounds of food) with GL?  Also for the feeding guidelines…do I measure the recommended feeding amount while it’s dry? or do I measure a smaller amount and then add water to let it swell to the appropriate amount?  Sorry, I’m new to all this dehydrated food, and I can’t seem to grasp how there is 51 pounds of food in a 10 pound bag, if you are still measuring the same amount dry as you are with kibble.  Thanks for putting up with the questions and for any answers!

  • SanDnMila

    She likes it and eats it all, just wondering why it’s only with this kind of food that makes her throw up, the freeze-dried treats I give her don’t do it.

  • LA

    My dogs never took to the food – they would spit it out – the company Honest Kitchen is great – but my dogs did not like food.

  • SanDnMila

    Why is it that when Mila has this food (Chicken) or THK Love she vomits a little afterwards? I give her less than the recommended amount for her weight. Should I just cut down even more and use them as just toppers?

  • Bee

    Not really, although I did have some concern before I purchased it since many reviewers had commented on that being an issue. Unfortunately, I haven’t prepared any of the other formulas so I don’t really have anything to compare it to. I think the rabbit formula has a very rich aroma which the dogs absolutely love and my picky eater just whines for it while I’m making it and licks the bowl clean like you said. Honestly, when prepared with really hot water, the smell is similar to a thanksgiving stuffing =) I will say that some of the rabbit chunks are very large and the very large pieces may not become fully softened, but neither dog has had a problem chewing them up to swallow! I think I am just biased about chicken because they are so over populated and I worry about the longevity of my dogs eating it, so that is why I went with the rabbit formula. I myself would rather eat turkey than chicken, but that is my personal preference =). Let me know if you try the rabbit. We recently have been giving them the GL treats and they are fantastic too!

  • melissa

     Bee-

    Glad to hear it! I too use the pureformance line as a mix in or topper with my Acana. The dogs love it and the bowls end up looking like I just washed them , lol. One question as I have not tried the rabbit-Does it have the same strong garlic smell as the chicken?

  • maxine7

    My Springer Spaniel loves this food- every formula I’ve tried him on… I like that the food provides him with healthy, lean proteins, isn’t too heavy on the carbs, and gives him better hydration than dry kibble :)  Good stuff!

  • SandyDuarte

    Picked up a bag of the chicken today at the doggiefood.com warehouse. Mila seemed to really enjoy it!!

  • Bee

    Thank you guys for all your help! I have purchased the rabbit formula and have had the boys on it for 2 weeks now and they absolutely love it! My 9 year old Patterdale terrier has recovered from his loose bowels and my rescue has stopped the continual licking and scratching, and his bowels are healthy again.  I’m very impressed in only 2 weeks time, as I have chosen to remain using the orijen regional red along with this formula because it seems to have equalized the issues I had on the red alone.  My nine year old would vomit on the red alone so I’ve been mixing 1/2 cup of Pureformance rabbit and about 15 kibble of the red for each meal and we couldn’t be happier with the results.  No vomiting in 2 weeks!  We give our 40 pound rescue, who is super picky and walks away from his food, 1/4 cup Pureformance and 3/4 cup regional red at each meal and he now whines and whimpers while I’m preparing it & gobbles it all up with no problem!  Thanks again everyone!

  • Lisa

    They are coming out with a new formula in September, potato free, and he said it is going to be a protein source that most dogs have never been exposed to. He can’t tell me what, he isn’t allowed to release that info, but he said it is going to help a lot of allergy dogs which is the majority of the calls he gets. He also told me with extreme allergy dogs he has had so far, he has not had anyone say the dog worsens in the beginning of starting this food, he said people notice they get better by the day. He said I am not alone, he gets many calls of people who have tried everything and that is why they are coming out with this new formula. I happened to look at a review and someone had a Beagle, and spent thousands of dollars on trying so many different foods and she said including a raw diet and this was the only one that got rid of the allergies. I know all dogs are different. I am curious to see what this will be in September. I named everything I tried and everything she is allergic to and he said it isnt anything I mentioned, which is a good thing!! 

  • melissa

     Hi Bee-For the chicken variety(which I have right now) 10-20lbs-average- 2/3-1 cup, active-3/4-1 1/4, senior 1/2-7/8

    20-30- 1-1 1/3 average. 1 1/4-1 3/4active, senior-7/8-1 1/4

    30-40- 1 1/3, 1 3/4-2, 1 1/4-1 2/3(aver, active, senior)

    40-50 1 3/4-2 1/4, 2-2 1/3, 1 2/3-2,(cups, aver,a ctive, senior)

    Typically, you can plan on feeding less of this type of food, however, I do have two dogs that require more of this than say the Acana grainfree that I normally feed.

  • hounddogmom12

    I always recommend calculating feeding amounts based on calories rather than cups. Orijen has roughly 500 kcal. per cup, Grandma Lucy’s has roughly 600 kcal. per cup. So adjust the amounts accordingly. Just figure out how many calories you were feeding with Orijen and feed the same calories with Grandma Lucy’s (you will need to feed less Grandma Lucy’s).

  • Bee

    I haven’t purchased it yet so I haven’t seen the back of the bag….are the amounts based on dogs weight? I have a 20lb and 40lb dog to feed… would you mind telling me what they recommend they be fed?

  • melissa

     Bee-

    You mix the GL 1 cup to 1 1-1/2 cups water, and the feeding amounts are based on the DRY portion-So, if the bag says your dog needs 1 cup per day, its one cup of the powdered, before water is added. If it says 3/4 cup, its 3/4 cup dry, mixed with 3/4-1-1/4 water-in other words, 1 part dry to 1 to 1.5 times the water. The feeding directions are pretty good in terms of puppy, adult, active and senior all being listed on the back in terms of amounts. I feed the GL pureperformance chicken as a topper from time to time. Dogs love it, my only complaint is the garlic smell. I love garlic, but I am worried about how much is in it for it to be so pungent when mixed.

  • Bee

    Ok my next question is based on feeding amounts… Grandma Lucy’s website says 1 cup of dried to 1-1.5 cups water…. I feed my rescue 2 full cups a day of Orijen and my other dog 1 full cup per day.  Would I reduce the GL dried to a 1/2 cup for my rescue and a quarter cup for my little one then?  I don’t really know how much intake they should be getting now that it ultimately will be a raw food diet when it’s hydrated. 

  • Bee

    I definitely like pumpkin for them but I would rather not have to add that every time because then they get too firm.  I’m actually looking for something that doesn’t have the acidophilis in it because that may be the trigger since they already have normal frequency in making bowels

  • Bee

    Well, I’m worried it’s too high in protein (origen) and this is causing my little one some runnier bowels?

  • Daves Hounds

    Orijen caused digestive problems for both my dogs and we stuck with it for quite a while. I now feed Ziwipeak air dried and canned and would highly recommend them. I have never tried Grandma Lucy’s though. I have also found my dogs need pumpkin with grain free food. It has made a world of difference. 

  • hounddogmom12

    Hi Bee,

    Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance is definitely a good food but Orijen actually has more protein. Since the Grandma Lucy’s is freeze-dried raw it may help the digestive issues. However, if they like the Orijen and you’re looking for a high protein food I would try adding a digestive enzyme and probiotic supplement to the Orijen and see if that helps. Flying Basset Organics and The Wholistic Pet both have some good digestive supplements you could try.

  • Bee

    I have a question maybe someone could answer for me.  My two dogs are currently on Orijen Red and both of my dogs are very fit and muscular so I thought a higher protein diet would be a good choice for them. They like the food but my 9 year old patter dale terrier is having some digestive issues and has battled with it for his whole life. He had been previously on Natural Balance potato and duck and his stools were perfect but he would have occasional vomiting. I have been researching for days now and I came across this food GL Pureformance Rabbit and think this might be a perfect food for them to both be on. My other dog is a rescue and he is about 2 and we believe he has some form of allergy because he licks all the time but has been much less on the Orijen.  What are some of your thoughts?

  • Kaylin

    I fed the Rabbit to my adult chihuahua mix for 3 weeks and she liked it in the beginning. She started picking out the celery and a little bit of other food. She just does not like it anymore it seems.

    I fed her as stated on the package and then moved up to 1 cup per day because she was getting really skinny. She go way too often. It is highly digestive. It seems like she goes after every meal. She poop in the house 2 times and that just doesn’t happen. Her stools were nice and firm but way too much waste. She had a hard time controlling herself sometimes. I feed her 3 times a day and she is still not satisfy. Even 2 times a day is not working. She is hungry all the time. Unless I feed her more than 1 cup. It gets pricey then.

    Although I love the ingredients, it did not fit well for my dog.

  • Jolieqe

    Oops, I meant potatoes can cause yeast because of the carbs…

  • Jolieqe

    First time posting here! To Nabble nabble- I heard potatoes can cause yeast issues because of the yeast. How is your dog doing on this food now?

    Does this mean GL is considered a high carb food?

  • melissa

    I bought a bag of this the other day, and while the dogs love it, boy is the garlic overpowering when you mix it up!

  • Jackie

    I’ve been using this food for a few weeks now. My dog really likes it, it smells great, and it is slightly chunkier than the Artisan line (so less food gets stuck to his chin). I bought the chicken flavor and will probably buy the rabbit next time for variety.

  • CG

     Yes, I definitely agree. I have a dog with a ton of allergies and it has been a struggle to find a good food that works for her. She has been doing great on this food. I don’t like most of the limited ingredient “hypoallergenic” foods out there because they aren’t very high quality. It’s possible that your dog could react to the rabbit or some of the fruits and vegetables, but it’s very unlikely. I slowly discovered that mine even reacts to white potatoes, so that makes it extremely difficult to find food for her. This one is perfect.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1332728607 Omar D. Plumey

    This would make a good hypoallergenic food, no?
     

  • http://www.dfwpugs.com/ sandy
  • Sovida

    http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/

    This is an EXCELLENT link on coconut oil
    Sorry about the repeat post I kept trying to delete and couldn’t figure out how (I’m on my cell)
    Hope you read the link very very informative!
    Have a GR-888 Day <3

  • Sovida

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    FORUMS > Health, Wellness and Nutrition
    Topic Title: Is coconut oil good for dogs?
    Created On Wed September 28, 2005 11:08 AM Topic View:

    fookie
    Member

    Posts: 31
    Joined: Oct 2003
    Wed September 28, 2005 11:08 AM

    Hi, Everyone,

    I have read an article on the current issue of “The Whole Dog Journal” about the benefits of coconut oil. I would like to know if anyone has tried it to our pets and what the outcome is. Any info is appreciated.

    Fookie

     
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    fookie
    Member

    Posts: 31
    Joined: Oct 2003
    Thu September 29, 2005 11:53 AM

    According to the article, you can use it as supplement and/or apply to skin problem. But only use the unrefined or virgin kind.

     
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    trobb
    Member

    Posts: 1
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Tue November 29, 2005 1:56 PM

    Hi All,

    I use coconut oil for my dogs everyday and have noticed a tremendous difference in their skin and coat. Also, they were very bored with their kibble before and now they practically knock me over for the food. They also like to eat the coconut oil straight out of the jar. I have also started feeding the dogs a little bit of red palm oil for the vitamins A & E. I melt the two oils together and pour it over their kibble. I use Innova which they seem to like.

    I started doing this after we started using coconut and palm oils in our family for our own food. It made a huge difference in my personal health, and actually the dogs came as sort of an accident. One day, I spilled some coconut oil, and the dogs went nuts. I tried handing them a spoonfull and they could not eat it fast enough. After some searching on google…whole dog journal, etc…I started feeding it to them and have been very happy with it.

    Check out http://www.junglepi.com for a good source.

    Hope this helps.

    ted

     
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    xena_my_peke
    Member

    Posts: 8
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Fri December 09, 2005 12:11 AM

    you know, how science and research changes all the time, i remember, when i was in high school, i saw on the today show, they did an exerpt on coconut oil, saying it caused cancer, and now they say it actually prevents it. i have been avoiding it when all possible ever since, i read this and googled it, and its back to being healthy for you again!! geesh! lol, just thought i’d share.

     
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    nicky01
    Member

    Posts: 48
    Joined: Feb 2004
    Fri December 09, 2005 8:19 PM

    The Whole Dog Journal mentioned the earlier studies about coconut oil – they were done with the processed oil which is bad, not the virgin oil which is supposed to have all the health benefits.

    Our dog had a small bump on his nose for about a month when I read the WDJ article and it made me curious. The vet had said that it didn’t look like anything to be concerned about, perhaps the result of a virus that he may have picked up from another dog or an insect bite. I checked around a bit and talked to a co-workers that’s into health foods and decided to give the coconut oil a try. I put a dab on his bump once a day and in three days it was gone.

     
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    ameribulldog
    Member

    Posts: 2
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Mon December 12, 2005 12:28 AM

    I have an 18 month old conformation/weight pull bred American Pit Bull Terrier. He has had allergy problems since we moved down south. I have tried just about everything under the sun. I was wondering if the coconut oil might help him. He is allergic to dust mites, grass you name it. Does anyone know of a site that explains all of its uses in dogs? Thank you.

     
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    MightyMiteDogGear
    Member

    Posts: 10
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Fri January 01, 2010 2:45 PM

    There is a great article from Whole Dog Journal outlining everything this is to know about coconut oil supplementation – and yes – it is used for dogs with allergies:

    http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/8_10/features/15754-1.html

     
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    FORUMS > Health, Wellness and Nutrition

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  • Sovida

    Navigation:

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    FORUMS > Health, Wellness and Nutrition
    Topic Title: Is coconut oil good for dogs?
    Created On Wed September 28, 2005 11:08 AM Topic View:

    fookie
    Member

    Posts: 31
    Joined: Oct 2003
    Wed September 28, 2005 11:08 AM

    Hi, Everyone,

    I have read an article on the current issue of “The Whole Dog Journal” about the benefits of coconut oil. I would like to know if anyone has tried it to our pets and what the outcome is. Any info is appreciated.

    Fookie

     
    Reply
       
    Quote
       
    Top
       
    Bottom
         

    fookie
    Member

    Posts: 31
    Joined: Oct 2003
    Thu September 29, 2005 11:53 AM

    According to the article, you can use it as supplement and/or apply to skin problem. But only use the unrefined or virgin kind.

     
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    trobb
    Member

    Posts: 1
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Tue November 29, 2005 1:56 PM

    Hi All,

    I use coconut oil for my dogs everyday and have noticed a tremendous difference in their skin and coat. Also, they were very bored with their kibble before and now they practically knock me over for the food. They also like to eat the coconut oil straight out of the jar. I have also started feeding the dogs a little bit of red palm oil for the vitamins A & E. I melt the two oils together and pour it over their kibble. I use Innova which they seem to like.

    I started doing this after we started using coconut and palm oils in our family for our own food. It made a huge difference in my personal health, and actually the dogs came as sort of an accident. One day, I spilled some coconut oil, and the dogs went nuts. I tried handing them a spoonfull and they could not eat it fast enough. After some searching on google…whole dog journal, etc…I started feeding it to them and have been very happy with it.

    Check out http://www.junglepi.com for a good source.

    Hope this helps.

    ted

     
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    Quote
       
    Top
       
    Bottom
         

    xena_my_peke
    Member

    Posts: 8
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Fri December 09, 2005 12:11 AM

    you know, how science and research changes all the time, i remember, when i was in high school, i saw on the today show, they did an exerpt on coconut oil, saying it caused cancer, and now they say it actually prevents it. i have been avoiding it when all possible ever since, i read this and googled it, and its back to being healthy for you again!! geesh! lol, just thought i’d share.

     
    Reply
       
    Quote
       
    Top
       
    Bottom
         

    nicky01
    Member

    Posts: 48
    Joined: Feb 2004
    Fri December 09, 2005 8:19 PM

    The Whole Dog Journal mentioned the earlier studies about coconut oil – they were done with the processed oil which is bad, not the virgin oil which is supposed to have all the health benefits.

    Our dog had a small bump on his nose for about a month when I read the WDJ article and it made me curious. The vet had said that it didn’t look like anything to be concerned about, perhaps the result of a virus that he may have picked up from another dog or an insect bite. I checked around a bit and talked to a co-workers that’s into health foods and decided to give the coconut oil a try. I put a dab on his bump once a day and in three days it was gone.

     
    Reply
       
    Quote
       
    Top
       
    Bottom
         

    ameribulldog
    Member

    Posts: 2
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Mon December 12, 2005 12:28 AM

    I have an 18 month old conformation/weight pull bred American Pit Bull Terrier. He has had allergy problems since we moved down south. I have tried just about everything under the sun. I was wondering if the coconut oil might help him. He is allergic to dust mites, grass you name it. Does anyone know of a site that explains all of its uses in dogs? Thank you.

     
    Reply
       
    Quote
       
    Top
       
    Bottom
         

    MightyMiteDogGear
    Member

    Posts: 10
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Fri January 01, 2010 2:45 PM

    There is a great article from Whole Dog Journal outlining everything this is to know about coconut oil supplementation – and yes – it is used for dogs with allergies:

    http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/8_10/features/15754-1.html

     
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  • Sovida

    Yes!!! It has so many other benefits! My Sabrina has satin skin absolutely no itches at all everyone always says They can”t believe these are beagles coats both like satin sheets coats glow and absolutely no shedding. Except for 3 wks in dec a dogs normal time to shed. Then right back to no shedding.
    I take some coconut out of the jar ( first I eat some lol it’s soooo good) it starts to melt in your hand and they both lick if off. I also buy coconut chip and give a few during the day oh also what’s left on my hands I rub on their bellies inside their thighs and also use on their foot pads so they don’t get dry or crack I buy it online at Amazion.com just type in coconut oil for pets They’re ate tons of articles on the benefit from it for pets and us. Just google in BENEFITS OF COCONUT OIL FOR MY PETS. :0)

  • Nabbie Nabbie

    Interesting! Is coconut oil just as good as salmon oil in terms of Omega 3?

  • Mary Lou

    Hi Dawn ~ just saw this.  Have been off of here for a few days.  We will be trying the Rabbit & Lamb tonight.  I have been ordering all of my ZiwiPeak from Wag .com.  It comes in two days with free shipping at $49.  I also order Stella & Chewy’s from them.  I have been very pleased with the service and freshness.  They don’t have the variety pack, but that’s ok.  : )

  • Dawn

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    Home » Dogs » Dog Food » Starve Out Yeast Dog Food

    Starve Out Yeast Dog Food
    Posted by: Ed Lukacevic Tags: Posted date: April 7, 2011 | 95 Comments Yeast infections in dog’s have reached record levels. The reason so many dogs are suffering from yeast infections is because today’s dog foods have such high carbohydrate contents. The yeast responsible for your dog’s yeast infection is Candida albicans and this yeast thrives on sugar. Basically, the high carbohydrate dog food provides an optimum environment for this opportunistic yeast to multiply. As this yeast reaches high levels it migrates throughout your dog’s system reeking havoc. Ear infections, skin infections, paw licking and terrible odor are a few symptoms of yeast infection in dogs.An effective way to combat the yeast is to starve them out by eliminating carbohydrates (sugar source) from your dog’s food.If you would like some more information to help you understand yeast infections in dogs, go to “Understanding Yeast Infections in Dogs” to identify common symptoms of yeast infections in dogs.Yeast Starvation Dog Food Recipe• 2 cups Raw Ground Beef (70/30). I buy the 10 pound roll which is about 20 cups and use the 70/30 higher fat content.• 1 1/4 tablespoons Lickochops (Supplies additions Omega 3, Omega 6 fatty Acids and Natural source vitamin E) *It is important to add this supplement, the recipe will be deficient without it.• Two hardboiled eggs with shells. Crumble the eggs shell into small pieces and mix with the ground beef. Eggshells are an excellent source of digestible calcium for dogs and the lining of the eggshell contains glucosamine.• Dinovite Liquid (Supplies digestive enzymes, trace minerals, fatty acids, vitamins and Direct Fed Microbials) *It is important to add this supplement, the recipe will be deficient without it.If you purchase the Dinovite Liquid in the multi-use tube then add 1 1/4 tablespoons of Dinovite Liquid to the recipe.If you purchased Dinovite Liquid in the single serve packets for Small, Medium, Large or Giant Breed dogs then just feed the appropriate size packet for the portion of food your dog will eat.Bulk Yeast Starvation Dog Food Recipe
    • 10 pounds Raw Ground Beef (70/30). I buy the 10 pound roll which is about 20 cups and use the 70/30 higher fat content.• 18 hardboiled eggs with shells. Crumble the eggs shell into small pieces and mix with the ground beef. Eggshells are an excellent source of digestible calcium for dogs and the lining of the eggshell contains glucosamine.• 1 tube Lickochops (Supplies additions Omega 3, Omega 6 fatty Acids and Natural source vitamin E) *It is important to add this supplement, the recipe will be deficient without it.• 1 tube Dinovite Liquid (Supplies digestive enzymes, trace minerals, fatty acids, vitamins and Direct Fed Microbials) *It is important to add this supplement, the recipe will be deficient without it.If you purchased Dinovite Liquid in the single serve packets for Small, Medium, Large or Giant Breed dogs then just feed the appropriate size packet for the portion of food your dog will eat.Special Note: Dogs have a very acidic stomach (PH of 1) environment that kills the bacteria on fresh meat. This is how they can eat fresh meat and not get sick. It is also why dogs can knock over garbage cans, eat the contents and live to do it again the next week. After all they are scavengers. It all makes sense.Introducing the Yeast Starvation Dog FoodI recommend a 24 hour fast no food or treats just water. Make available a mixture of 1 gallon distilled water with 2 tbs of apple cider vinegar. Your pet can take as little or as much water as he wants.This will give time for the old dog food to pass through your dog’s digestive tract. It is important to follow this procedure to limit digestive upset.Day one and two: Feed a portion 1/8 the size of a normal meal.
    Day three and four: Feed a portion 1/4 the size of a normal meal.
    Day five and six: Feed a portion 1/2 the size of a normal meal.
    Day seven :Feed a full portion.Note: The whole process takes 8 days when you include the 24 hour fast.This method will allow your dog’s digestive tract time to adapt to the new food. Please follow this introductory method your dog will be fine. Your dog will not starve or hate you. Rapid diet changes can cause vomiting and diarrhea.***Important Note: Do not mix kibble and the raw “Starve Out Yeast Dog Food” together! Doing so will GREATLY increase the chances of digestive upset for your dog!Make the commitment to feed your dog the “yeast starvation diet for at least 30-90 days. For the first few weeks your dog can have flare ups and could appear to be getting worse. Don’t panic, this can happen if the yeast die off rapidly. A mass die-off of yeast sends toxins throughout your dog’s system, resulting in the symptoms actually getting worse. Some dog’s even get lethargic. After your 30-90 day yeast starvation diet, remember that a high carb diet is totally inappropriate for dogs and cats. Don’t go back to the high grain kibble that may have gotten your pet in trouble to begin with. Feeding a meaty diet is the best thing you can do for your pet! To read more about feeding a Meaty Raw Diet, see Basics of a Raw Diet and Basics of a Raw Diet, Part 2Using DogOsuds Natural/Organic shampoo will sooth your dog’s irritated skin while your dog’s body is fighting the yeast infection on the inside! It’s a ONE-TWO punch for yeast infections in dogs! The Peppermint/Tea Tree or Essential Oil Blend both contain therapeutic grade tea tree essential oil which soothe skin that is irritated by your dog’s yeast infection.
    Haagan’s Story: Just want to tell you we rescued a 7 yr old Dachshund a year ago, and he had skin allergies because his previous owner didn’t feed him quality food and he had a lot of stress in his life. After putting him on an holistic/organic grain free food with Omega 3 and trying fish oil we noticed a change. His fur started to grow back slowly, but we still had a problem with constant itching, dry skin, chewing and (smelly) ear due to yeast. No More Yeast!The ear medicine from the Vet had bad side effects like temporary deafness, it smelled bad etc. and Prednizone didn’t help anything. Even oatmeal baths were only a temporary solution. It was frustrating to see him suffer Well I heard your commercial on the radio (a year later) and decided to give Dinovite a try. I bought enough tubes for 90 days and I have to tell you within one week we have noticed a tremendous difference. He no longer chews his skin, his fur shines like never before, some of the bald patches he had (on his back by his tail) are now growing fur, and he no longer smells from the yeast growing in his ears. Even his breath is fresher. We can see how much happier he has become, and getting dog kisses has become a very common thing from him. I know it can take up to 90 days to see improvement but I have to say it happened sooner for our dachshund.Carol Proctor, Colorado Springs,

  • Dawn

    Oh i thought i did reply to nabbie? oopsies…my youngest can not have any kind of fish at all.  :O/

  • Shawna

    Hi Dawn ~~ it’s actually Nabbie Nabbie that uses the salmon oil :)..  I feed sardines for omega 3 fatty acids :)

    It is really interesting that your pup has issues with both types of omega 3 fats…  Do you try to limit the amounts of omega 6 in the diet since you can’t give omega 3?

  • Dawn

    My youngest girl (Beagle-Sabrina) chews and bites like cray to salmon oil and flaxseed oil. I give her coconut oil now and shes great. I noticed you wrote you use salmon oil..so threw ya my 2 cents in  :O)

  • Shawna

    You are very welcome Nabbie Nabbie :)

    One thing I didn’t mention — if it is yeast, as the yeast die off they give off toxins.  If the die off is too fast your pups can feel worse before they get better.  By adding in one thing at a time (coconut oil, probiotics, garlic etc) in small amounts and allowing some time before starting another you can slow down the die off and prevent some illness.. 

    Hope it all goes well!!!

  • Nabbie Nabbie

    Thank you SO SO MUCH for your reply!! Yes, I feed the sojo fruit & veg with meat (chicken) every day. We rescued him (and his buddy) from a shelter. When we first got him, his belly was pretty bald, red-ish, and he was scratching and munching on his paws all day long the poor thing. We definitely made some progress as his coat has gone really soft and the itching reduced significantly. It’s only recently that his itching started again. Thank you so much for the suggestions. I will get started on the elimination of peanut butter and see how things go. Again, thank you so much!!

  • Shawna

    Hi Nabbie Nabbie ~~ Welcome as a first time poster :)  I think the others must have missed your post…

    No, vegetables are not bad in the diet but meat (and other animal protein sources) needs to be the largest part of the diet.  Too much fat or too many veggies/grains can displace the protein. 

    Yes, veggies can be difficult for dogs to digest.  Veggies have an outer layer called cellulose.  Dogs do not make the enzyme (cellulase) that breaks down cellulose.  So if veggie is fed whole and without added enzymes then pup can not digest it.  By lightly cooking (steaming) or by grating the veggies you can manually free the nutrients in the veggies to make them digestible. :)

    I’m not sure I understand your comment — do you feed the Sojo’s fruit and veggie on its own or with meat you supply.  If on own then your pups could be very protein deficient..  The fruit and veggie is a premix and supposed to be added to meat..  If I misunderstood then —- never mind :)

    I don’t think that food actually creates a yeast infection.  Rather, the good gut bacteria are damaged allowing the yeast to get all the food.  When the yeast gets all the food they multiply and a candida infection happens.  Chlorinated water, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, antibiotics, excess stress etc can all cause a die off of the good gut microbes.

    The goal in treating a yeast infection   1. get as much of the sugar out of the diet to starve the yeast (this includes root vegetables, fruit, grains etc).  2. Add probiotics back in to create a balance of bacteria to yeast.  3. Add yeast killing foods to the diet — like garlic, coconut oil and (not technically a food) probiotics.

    Not knowing all the symptoms — peanuts have a lectin (type of protein) in them that can be problematic.  Itching is a symptom of a food allergy or intolerance too.  Might not hurt to eliminate the peanut butter for a week or so just to rule it out as a possible cause?

    Hope that helps :)  Maybe someone else will pop on with some additional thoughts!!

  • Nabbie Nabbie

     
    Hello all,
    First, what an amazing website!! I have been browsing this site since we adopted our dogs 6 months ago. What an incredible source of information this site has been!
    So here is my very first post:
    One of my dogs has been itching quite a bit recently. The owner of a local pet store assessed (based on our description of the symptoms) that our dog most likely has a yeast infection and recommended we switched from our current Sojo grain free dog mix food (veg & fruit one) to Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance Chicken.
    He additionally recommended to stop feeding our dog ingredients that produce yeast. He did not provide specifics so I did some research but could not quite find a list of such ingredients.
    In the last 2 months, we have been feeding our dogs:
     boiled white rice, boneless skinless boiled chicken, pumpkin or sweet potato or squash, sojo grain free dog food mix. We add 1 pump of Pluto salmon oil every morning.
    We sometimes swap the rice for Castor & Pollux Organix grain free kibble.
    We also give them peanut butter as a treat during the day.
    I compared the ingredients between Sojo grain free dog food mix and the Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance Chicken. Aside from the chicken, I could not see any big difference. They both seem to have similar veggies.
    Ingredients of Sojo are: Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Broccoli, Celery, Apples, Whole Egg, Flax Meal, Parsley Leaf, Tricalcium Phosphate, Carob Powder, Kelp Powder, Alfalfa, Ginger Root, Garlic, Vitamin D3
    Ingredients of GLPC are: USDA chicken, chickpeas, flax, carrots, celery, apples, bananas, blueberries, cranberries, pumpkin, papaya, spinach, garlic, rosemary, vitamin A, Vitamin D3, Vitamin E, Niacin, Iron, Calcium, Phosporus, Zinc, Riboflavin, Thiamine, Potassium, Manganese, Chloride, Copper, Magnesium, Pyridoxine, Cyanocobalamin.
     
    My questions to this incredibly knowledgeable community of yours:
    – what ingredients in the Sojo mix would create a yeast infection?
    – what other ingredients create yeast infection? (Are vegetables good for our pups? (I read a couple of articles on the web that dogs cannot quite digest vegetables)).
     
    Thank you so so much for any input you may have. My two little Russell terriers mix will be very grateful too! Looking forward to your input!

  • Sovida

    tisk tisk on me…I wrote my other message before seeing you already received the rabbit & lamb lol so…never mind what i said!  :O) oh I also buy it and other things at wholepet.com because you can buy “A” can. (of many diff brands) so your not stuck with a whole case of food that you had a problem with. Onlynaturalpet.com has that too..but Im on Long Island NY and they are in colorado and it takes about a week maybe a little longer.. but sometimes worth it when you want to try a ..few…diff brands you can buy 2 cans of this 1 can of that etc…just my 2 cents  :O)

  • Dawn

    @MARYLOU—I order my rabbit & lamb from amazon.com takes 2 days to receive. My girls LOVE it. ITS MEGA MEGA EXPENSIVE. with two dogs I use it as part of thier rotation. Let me warn ya…it is..very rich. When you start give just like 2 tbs or you may been chasing a watery butt or vomit. They do…not.., even on a reg basis need as much of it…theres no garbage or fillers in it at all..why you will be serving a lot less then reg canned food… ENJOY!

  • Mary Lou

    sandy ~ now as delectable as those all sound, I think we best save some of the “unique” delicacies just in case we need them down the road.  ; )

    Our ZiwiPeak Rabbit and Lamb arrives tomorrow.  Yummy!

  • sandy

    You’re welcome!  Have you  tried Addiction canned rabbit & blueberries or duck confit or brushtail (possum) and vegetables?  They even have eel & venison (unagi & seaweed canned).  My crew eat all those flavors.  What about just canned lamb tripe like Tripett? It has very few ingredients.

    http://shop.addictionfoods.com/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&page=shop.browse&category_id=7&Itemid=102

    http://www.tripett.com/Home.html

  • Mary Lou

    I was actually looking for it today ~ I saved your list from earlier and knew you had stated that.  Thanks!  The store had every protein source except the rabbit.  They will order it if I decide I want to give it a try.

    I sure do appreciate all the research you do for us!  It saves so much time!  Thanks, again!  : )

  • sandy

    Primal Rabbit has the lowest fat in their line-up at 15%.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com/ Mike Sagman

    Hi Mary Lou,

    Good news. Disqus Support wrote me back regarding the gravatar issue you asked about. And here’s their reply:

    “We were able to discover the culprit on our end and are looking into resolutions currently. We’ll be in touch again once a fix is live if any next steps are necessary on the part of the commenter; otherwise as always don’t hesitate to contact us with any further questions and thank you for bringing this to our attention.

    Hopefully, Dupree will be on display very soon.

  • Mary Lou

    I picked up some samples of the rabbit today.  Mixed up a little bit to give Dupree a taste.  Don’t want to overdo with his issues.  It smelled so good ~ like something I might want to taste.  : )  He ate it up and was looking for more.  I am anxious to see how his body reacts to it as I have been looking for a lower fat food. 

  • Jackie

    Megan is right, if you bother to read the bag they explain that they grind everything up together (which is where you get the mashed potatoes-like mushy consistency) but throw in a few chunks on top for aesthetic value basically. My dog loves the Artisan product, we are going to have to check out the Pureformance! I have compared it with Honest Kitchen and I really think GL is better; HK had a lot more undigested bits in my dog’s droppings (clearly visible) and so idk if you are getting the whole value there.

  • Megan

    Yes, Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance is the same (Freeze-dried) consistency as the Artisan line. However neither is “all potatoes” or “all chickpeas”. The meat has been ground up into the food so that dogs do not simply pick out meat pieces without eating the rest, thus giving each portion you feed relatively equal meat content. They place larger chunks of meat at the top of each bag for effect so the consumer can see the quality of meat that has gone into the product. (Information found written on product bag.)

  • Dawn Leder

    HI MIKE
    THANKS FOR GETTING BACK TO ME..I WAS JUST COMING HERE TO LET YA KNOW I WENT TO THE WEBSITE…ITS EXACTLY (TEXTURE) LIKE ALL THE OTHERS…EXCEPT…INSTEAD OF IT BEING ALL POTATOES…ITS ALL CHICKPEAS…..
    THANKS THOUGH!
    HAVE A GREAT WEEK! AND A SUNNY SUNDAY :o)

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Dawn… I don’t see potato anywhere on the GL Pureformance label. Artisan does include “potato” on its list, but I don’t know what form the raw material comes from. You’ll need to call GL’s customer service for any information you don’t find on the label.

    Until someone who actually knows this item is indeed “mostly ground potato”, it could be just another Internet rumor. Hope this helps.

  • Dawn Leder

    HI MIKE
    I JUST NOTICED THIS ON ANOTHER SITE AND CAME RIGHT HERE, I SEE ITS..BRAND NEW!? OR YOU JUST GOT AROUND TO IT?
    DO YOU KNOW IF ITS LIKE THE REST OF GRANDMA LUCY’S FOOD? ALL POWDERY AND MOSTLY GROUND POTATO? OR IS IT CHUNKS OF FREEZE DRIED FOOD?
    THANKS! :o)

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi J Aaron… I agree with your suggestion. Consider it done. Thanks for the tip.

  • J Aaron

    And I forgot, I think footnote “1” would also go better with the one from Nature’s Logic:

    “Adapted by The Dog Food Advisor from the definition of meat published by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (2008) ↩”

  • J Aaron

    Understood :). You can delete my posts since the correction is made if you wish.

    Just one more quibble first. I prefer the statement you have on your Nature’s Logic review, unless they do use the skin of rabbits also:

    “The first ingredient in this dog food is rabbit. Rabbit is considered “the clean flesh derived from slaughtered rabbit” and associated with skeletal muscle or the muscle tissues of the tongue, diaphragm, heart or esophagus.1″

    Thanks for all your work.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi J Aaron… Oops. Must have been too close to bedtime. Thanks for the tip.

  • J Aaron

    “The first ingredient in this dog food is rabbit. Rabbit is considered “the clean combination of flesh and skin… derived from the parts or whole carcasses of turkey”.1″

    Rabbit is turkey?