Dave’s 95% Premium (Canned)

Share

Rating: ★★★★½

Dave’s 95% Premium canned dog food receives the Advisor’s second-highest tier rating of 4.5 stars.

The Dave’s 95% Premium product line includes four canned dog foods, each claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for adult maintenance.

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Dave’s 95% Premium Beef (5 stars)
  • Dave’s 95% Premium Turkey (4 stars)
  • Dave’s 95% Premium Beef and Chicken
  • Dave’s 95% Premium Chicken (3.5 stars)

Dave’s 95% Premium Chicken was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Dave's 95% Premium Chicken

Canned Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 46% | Fat = 41% | Carbs = 6%

Ingredients: Chicken, chicken broth, chicken liver, agar-agar, potassium chloride, salt, choline chloride, calcium carbonate, iron proteinate, zinc proteinate, manganese proteinate, copper proteinate, magnesium proteinate, sodium selenite, calcium iodate, vitamin E supplement, thiamine mononitrate, niacin supplement, calcium pantothenate, biotin, vitamin A supplement, riboflavin supplement, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin B12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 4.5%

Red items indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis10%9%NA
Dry Matter Basis46%41%6%
Calorie Weighted Basis30%66%4%
Protein = 30% | Fat = 66% | Carbs = 4%

The first ingredient in this dog food is chicken. Chicken is considered “the clean combination of flesh and skin… derived from the parts or whole carcasses of chicken”.1

Chicken is naturally rich in the ten essential amino acids required by a dog to sustain life.

The second ingredient is chicken broth. Broths are nutritionally empty. But because they add both flavor and moisture to a dog food they are a common finding in many canned products.

The third ingredient is chicken liver. This is an organ meat sourced from a named animal and thus considered a beneficial component.

The fourth ingredient is agar agar, a natural vegetable gelatin derived from the cell walls of certain species of red algae. Agar is rich in fiber and is used in wet pet foods as a gelling agent.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With one notable exception

This food contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Dave’s 95% Premium Canned Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Dave’s 95% Premium canned dog food looks like an above-average wet product.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 46%, a fat level of 41% and estimated carbohydrates of about 6%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 44% and a mean fat level of 36%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 12% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 81%.

Above-average protein. Above-average fat. And below-average carbs when compared to a typical canned dog food.

Free of any plant-based protein boosters, this looks like the profile of a wet product containing a significant amount of meat.

However, with 66% of the total calories in our example coming from fat versus just 30% from protein, some recipes may not be suitable for every animal. In addition, this same finding also prevents us from awarding the brand a higher rating.

Bottom line?

Dave’s 95% Premium is a grain-free meat-based canned dog food using a significant amount of beef or poultry as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 4.5 stars.

Highly recommended.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content and (when appropriate) their fat-to-protein ratios.

Shoppers looking for a more traditional wet food from the same company may wish to visit our review of Dave’s Delectable Dinners.

Dave’s Dog Food
Recall History

The following list (if present) includes all dog food recalls since 2009 directly related to this product line. If there are no recalls listed in this section, we have not yet reported any events.

You can view a complete list of all dog food recalls sorted by date. Or view the same list sorted alphabetically by brand.

To learn why our ratings have nothing to do with a product’s recall history, please visit our Dog Food Recalls FAQ page.

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Advisor’s recall notification list.

Dog Food Coupons
and Discounts

Readers are invited to check for coupons and discounts shared by others in our Dog Food Coupons Forum.

Or click the buying tip below. Please be advised we receive a fee for referrals made to the following online store.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

The Dog Food Advisor does not test dog food products.

We rely almost entirely on the integrity of the information posted by each company on its website. As such, the accuracy of every review is directly dependent upon the quality of the test results from any specific batch of food a company chooses to publish.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

However, we do receive a fee from Chewy.com for each purchase made as a direct result of a referral from our website. This fee is a fixed dollar amount and has nothing to do with the size of an order or the brand selected for purchase.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

03/06/2016 Last Update

  1. Association of American Feed Control Officials
  • EmpatheticRN

    I used to get the Dave’s 95% Premium Chicken for my dog and she loved it. To me it smelled just like canned chicken and was light in appearance, that we humans use. Now, the last time I bought it, about 6 months ago, the label says, “Original Formula”, and it is not the same. It is darker in appearance and isn’t wet anymore….just drier and mealy looking. I called Chewy about it and they called the company. Chewy called me back and reported to me that they went with a different company for the manufacture of the Dave’s 95% Chicken. Chewy gave me a refund because my dog wouldn’t eat the stuff any longer. I was so upset over this, as my dog just absolutely loved the stuff before. Oh, and this new manufacturer changed some of the ingredients, if I recall, something to do with liver…..maybe beef liver?

  • This review was last updated directly from the company website and was current in September 2012. It is due to be updated within the next few weeks.

  • Crazy4cats

    Looks like it is up for review any day now.

  • Mike D’Innocenzio

    Why isn’t Carrageenan listed in the ingredients here? It’s clearly in it right from Dave’s web site. I would not rate this as a five star because of it.

  • theBCnut

    The only way is to email Dave’s and ask. They may or may not tell you who manufactures their food. If a company won’t tell me who manufactures their food, I assume they have something to hide, like that Evanger’s does their canning.

  • theBCnut

    Not because of mixing the types. The only way to get vitamin toxicity is if one or the other has been not formulated correctly, like when BB had too much Vit. D a few years ago, or if the dog got into something else that had too much of a particular vitamin. And the way I understand it, only fat soluable vitamins carry the risk of being overdosed. The body can eliminate excesses of water soluable vitamins.

  • Linda

    Is there a way to find out – who is the manufacturer for Dave’s Premium 95% Beef ? He has it manufactured and they put his label on it. this practice is called private labeling.

  • Linda

    I feed a good kibble, but want to feed a quality canned food in addition to it. Since there is a Dave’s nearby, I bought Dave’s 95% Premium Beef – when I bought it several years ago with my previous dog, I thought it was a topper (not a complete dog food). Now I see it is a complete dog food and it has a 5 star rating here. Is it OK to feed a half a can of this and a half-cup kibble twice a day – is this too much vitamin supplementation? Anyway. when I change a dog food, I do it very, very gradual transition to it. A week ago, the Dave’s 95% Premium Beef looked totally different consistency and color. I fed it. My dog vomited the entire meal about 8 hours after eating it. I did not realize for a few days, what had happened. The dog food was changed – the ingredient list was totally different. I emailed Dave’s and he replied “yes I did change manufacturers – but it is better and my dog likes it !” Well my dog likes it too – but this change has made him vomit for several days – because I did not transition to it slowly – I should have been told it was different. So I could have transitioned it slowly – not abruptly. This has upset me – not sure what to do now. He seems to have adjusted – but I am not sure, he is still not quite right. I still think this is good food, and I notified dogfodadvisor.com that there was a change and could they please update it, and Mike said he would.

  • Linda

    I have the same question – too bad no one answered yet

  • Mary Arkwright

    I don’t know where to ask this question but I was just wondering, if you feed your dog wet and dry food is there a chance of vitamin toxicity? 

  • PJ,

    You said, “my assumption was that this website tested the food to ensure that the ingredients are what they say they are in the amounts they say they are, as many other sites that rate products do.”

    Really?

    Would you please share with me a link to any dog food website (not a vitamin site) that actually “tests” the dog foods it reviews?

  • Pattyvaughn

    What is that Latin phrase ” caveat emptor” or something? “Let the buyer beware.”. That is definitely the way to approach dog food.

  • Pj

    I’m not saying he hasn’t done a good job. I’m just saying that when I came to this website at the recommendation of a friend who raved about it, my assumption was that this website tested the food to ensure that the ingredients are what they say they are in the amounts they say they are, as many other sites that rate products do.

    Now that I know how the rating system works and that it is based on the label, I’ll analyze accordingly.

  • Pattyvaughn

    Pj

    I don’t know about you but, I have not been charged a single penny for using this website, and I have not been subjected to tons of advertising. So how do you think Dr. Mike is going to pay for the lab testing of 3000 different foods? Are you going to give him the money? Because if it were at all feasible, I’m sure Dr. Mike would love to be able to do just that. He does the best that he can with what he’s got, and I think it’s amazing that he’s been able to do as much as he has.

    Thanks, Dr. Mike, for everything you do!

  • Pj

    Mike,
     
    Websites that rate vitamins and other food products have them tested. Consumer Labs, one of the leaders in rating vitamins, has them tested as what they have proven is that what the manufacturer puts on the label is often not consistent with what is actually in the product. They don’t just go by what the list of ingredients. In order to really offer an impartial analysis of dog foods, sending them to a lab and having them analyzed for the actual ingredients is really the only way of ensuring that they are what they say they are. One of the realities of labeling is that food manufacturers don’t have to list many of the additive they are legally allowed to put in the food. Often, there are many fillers that don’t show up on the label. The melamin issue comes to mind.
     
    If only one of my dogs had this reaction to the food, I would say it was the dog. But dogs of completely different breeds had the exact same reaction, so I’m believing it’s the food. When I spoke with my vet, she said that salt is often one of the fillers used to keep the costs down and doesn’t show on the label, along with MANY other filler ingredients.
     
    This is a great website, but the reality is that rating food that has not been analyzed for content really doesn’t offer a complete picture of what is and isn’t good nutrition.

  • LabsRawesome

    Hi Pj, very funny! You should be a comedian.  🙂

  • HI PJ,

    I agree. It would be nice for a website to test all the dog foods currently available on the market.

    However, how would YOU recommend we could go about testing a dog (or human) food so you could predict how an animal would react to each of its ingredient?

    What’s more, are you aware there are over 700 product reviews here representing nearly 3,000 individual recipes.

    How could any one person (or for that matter, even a team of 100 people) test and compare all those foods and the 50-100 ingredients within each recipe?

    I truly wish there was a way to forecast how your dog could have reacted to Dave’s 95% – or any other product. However, there simply is not any known practical way to accomplish such an extraordinary feat.

    In any case, thanks for your suggestion.

  • melissa

     PJ-

    test the foods for just WHAT? What bothers your dog may not bother mine, what your dog will eat, mine may not. Since each food affects each dog differently, there is no way to test the foods. Sure, we could say “is the dog dead or alive after 6 weeks?” but then again, what sends my dog into pancreatits may not yours.

    Then again, I would not be willing to offer up my pets for trial feeding of the low end foods-would you be willing to feed Ol Roy to confirm its full of crappolla? Since I am guessing not, the best I can do is pass ya a fork and say have at it : )

  • BryanV21

    I’m sure Dr. Mike would be more than happy with your help to test all the foods.

  • Pj

    I don’t think this website actually tests the food. Reading the ingredients on the label is not enough. Because of yeast issues, I switched my dogs to the Dave’s 95% and they were drinking water like they were dying. I mean getting up in the middle of the night and drinking an entire bowl of water, and they only weigh five pounds each. They were drinking so much water it was making them vomit. After a week of this, I went to another pet store and bought the EVO 95% and switched it out. The excessive drinking of water stopped immediately and they doing great on the EVO. The only thing I can think is that the Dave’s has an excessively high salt content, which they don’t have to list on the label and could be contained in the broth, which is the second ingredient. Oh, and someone on another pet food blog emailed Dave’s about the cat food and received a reply supposedly signed by Dave himself who said they were working on getting the ingredient listing on the website correct. Huh?  I would love to see this website actually test the food rather than take the manufacters word as to the ingredients.

  • Jerimiahrocks

    It’s better to add your own because when the vegetables are fresh your dog will benefit from naturally occurring enzymes that are lost in the cooking process.  They have to be fresh and raw to receive enzymes.  They also have to be put through a blender or a processor so they can be digested.  Dog’s can’t break down cellulose.  In the wild they would get their veggies predigested from their prey’s stomach content.

  • Duckle

    It’s just meat.  I’ve always understood that veggies are good for dogs, as long as there isn’t too much plant fiber, overall, and that adding more veggies are a good way to control calories for less active dogs.  Are you supposed to add your own?

  • John

    Dawn – So your dogs wouldn’t eat this food? Why do you think that is?

  • Dawn Leder

    WELL….I BOUGHT THE GRAIN FREE CANNED PORK AND THE DRY..AND THEY WANT ABSOLUTELY NOTHING TO DO WITH IT!
    I JUST FOUND A NEW PLACE TO GET FROZEN RAW…HAVE TO CALL TODAY AND SEE IF THEY DELIVER TO MY AREA…WITHOUT IT COSTING AN ARM AND A LEG :o/

  • DAWN

    Thanks Mike…of course Sabrina will love it…won’t be allergic…& they’ll stop selling it! I’ll think positive. 🙂
    They should…though…share that info with their customers? How did you…find out? Just curious.
    Thanks again & have a great week. 🙂

  • HI Dawn… I spoke with Dave’s Customer Service and as I understand their explanation they’re only marketing that grain free dry product in a very limited number of locations. I guess they’re just testing the demand for that product. So, not planning to review it right now.

    However, I did update all the Dave’s products in my database. You may notice some very minor changes. Except for the fact they’ve added 3 new products to Dave’s Delectable Dinners. No changes in ratings noted.

  • Dawn Leder

    But still would like to know about why limited time for the dry pork with brown rice? Thanks Mike. 🙂

    I guess your off for the weekends huh lol…I didn’t even realize it was..till I saw you didn’t answer…and you always do :O)

    I guess I will e-mail him..although have 2xs and no reply?….

  • DAWN

    oooook I stand corrected…He definitely has canned pork…grain free…but..not.. 95%. Sorry.
    But still would like to know about why limited dry with brown rice? Thanks Mike. 🙂

  • DAWN

    Hi Mike
    Yes there is def 95% pork I just bought it Thursday.
    I also bought the pork dry to go with it. I did not know it was for a limited time though? It did not mention that on his site? Can you tell me why that is?
    Thanks

  • Hi Dawn… The pork product you speak of is a kibble. And it’s my understanding it’s only being marketed on a limited basis right now. There is no canned pork recipe that I’m aware of. I’ve asked Dave’s to send me an update to include their new grain free recipes. I’ll go watch the video as soon as I get a chance. In the meantime, thanks for the tip.

  • DAWN LEDER

    OOPSIE…LOL I WROTE JORDAN…..
    I MEANT……..JONATHAN :o)

  • DAWN LEDER

    HI MIKE! HOW ARE YOU DOING TODAY? WELL I HOPE :o)
    I DIDN’T KNOW IF YOU KNEW…DAVES NOW HAS
    PORK 95%
    I WAS SOOO EXCITED. MY NEWEST BEAGLE SABRINA (WILL HAVE A HER 1ST B-DAY IN A FEW DAYS) :o)
    SHE IS ALLERGIC TO……EVERYTHING!!!(SO HARD WITH RAW (THAT SHE LOVES)…. BECAUSE TO BUY ALREADY MADE..ITS USUALLY..THE SAME-O SAME-O AND IF NOT..SHE HAD IT..TOO)…I FEEL SO BAD…BUT.. IM PULLING MY HAIR OUT! SHES LITERALLY HAD EVERY PROTEIN..SHE EVEN HAD PORK. HOWEVER….IT HAD..OF COURSE…CHICKEN IN IT TOO! UGH… THEY ALWAYS RUIN NOVEL PROTEINS BY ADDING CHICKEN OR BEEF OR TURKEY.
    EXCEPT ADDICTION…EVERTHING..THAT I’VE SEEN IS ONE PROTEIN.
    ANY WAY I HAPPENED TO SEE…WHILE LOOKING FOR SOMETHING ELSE …DAVES 95% PORK …..YAY!!
    I IMMEDIATELY CAME HERE OF COURSE…TO OUR MIKE..THE GOD OF DOG FOOD INGREDIENTS HEEHEE
    AND YOU LISTED IT VERY GOOD…I ASSUME THE PORK WOULD RATE THE SAME? IT LOOKED LIKE THE SAME AS THE OTHERS…JUST PORK INSTEAD OF CHICKEN BEEF ETC.
    THEN….DAH DAH DUM LOL THERE WAS ….A YOU TUBE VIDEO OF GOOD OL’ DAVE.
    NICE LOOKING REG GUY SITTING ON THE FLOOR IN HIS HUGE STORE…FEEDING HIS DOG SOME OF THE KIBBLE
    AS HE SPOKE.
    NOW I FEEL TORN….HIS VIDEO DEF HURT HIM..(IMO) …JORDAN–GORDON–SHAMELESS…I CAN HEAR YOUR VOICES ALREADY…GETTING ON ME FOR SOMETHING

    HE REALLY DOWN PLAYED THE FOOD! SAID “IT ISN’T THE BEST..BUT..IT’S NOT THE WORST” HUH?
    WHAT A WEIRD THING TO SAY ABOUT YOUR FOOD YOU DEVELOPED?? (RICHARD..WOULD YOU SAY THAT IN A VIDEO DESCRBING YOUR FOOD?) I TRUST NOT.
    IT DIDN’T MENTION AT ALL WHERE ITS SOURCED..SAID ITS HUMAN GRADE..IN A EH KIND OF WAY. SAID “I PUT ON A CHEAP LABEL…BECAUSE I DON’T HAVE THE MONEY”
    I DON’T KNOW..MAYBE IM JUST OVER CAUTIOUS? IT..AGAIN..(IMO)…SEEMED LIKE IT WASN’T ANY BETTER THEN ALPO. OKAY..I KNOW..THATS A BIT MUCH.
    CAN SOMEONE ELSE WATCH IT AND GIVE ME FEEDBACK?
    THAT WOULD BE AWESOME (I ALREADY ORDERED THE FOOD) BUT..WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FEEDBACK.
    THANKS BUNCHES IN ADVANCE :o)

  • Hi Dennis… It’s no secret I’m not a big fan of a high carbohydrate diet. As a general rule, the higher the carbs the lower the meat protein content. It’s that same unhealthy carbohydrate-dense, insulin-inducing, fat producing Western diet we’ve unfortunately been exporting to other countries… and now, to our pets, too.

  • Dennis

    Hi Mike..Sorry,wrote second question before reading first response.

  • Dennis

    Hi Mike… Your thoughts on hi-low carb. for yorkie.Thanks.

  • Hi Dennis… Unfortunately, since each dog responds to a particular food in its own unique way, I cannot provide customized product recommendations. However, please visit our FAQ page and look for the topic, “Help Me Choose a Dog Food” and “Dog Food Protein” for more information. Or check back for a possible response from one of our other readers. Hope this helps.

  • Dennis

    HI Mike…I have a 15 month barely 4 lb. yorkie. can you suggest a type of kibble and canned food that would be a healthy choice for my dog.My concerns are his weight,he had a low sugar episode,very finiky. Tried canine,now on blue buffalo.Wont eat it. Concerned about givind high protein food at that weight.Pardon the spelling.Thank you.

  • Hi Linda… Every dog food contains a different amount of moisture. We use dry matter basis to mathematically remove all the water from every dog food on our website to get a more accurate picture of the protein and fat content. On a dry matter basis, 16% represents the average fat content for all the kibbles (and 23% for all the canned products) in our database. These figures are neither high nor low. If you’re trying to go with a lower fat content, look for a canned food below this figure. Hope this helps.

  • linda

    Hello Mike,
    In your review you list the fat content as 23% comparing that to what the can itself says for some of their food (cannot remember which from looking at it from the store) is 5%, are we using the same stats? If so, isn’t 23% rather high? My one dog gets diahrea if she gets anything over 5%, and is better when i keep it to 4% (she has pancreatic issues, which is why i monitor her fat intake).

    Thank you
    linda

  • Hi Lynn… We’ve added Dave’s Grain Free to our To Do list. I’ll get to it as soon as I can. Selenium yeast is actually a good thing. Many argue about the toxicity of the synthetic version of selenium found in most dog foods. Selenium yeast is considered a much more natural and safer source of selenium for a dog. Hope this helps.

  • Lynn Thomas

    Sorry, Mike, I miss wrote – Dave’s grain free is CANNED only not dry! It IS the canned I’m inquiring about. Thanks again and sorry for the miss-print.

  • Lynn Thomas

    Saw Dave’s Grain-free canned and dry dog food in my local feed store and wondered what you thought of it? Is there anything about “selenium yeast” that puts up red flags? It looks like a good food, but I’d like your opinion. Thanks so much.

  • Hi Sharon… I would not recommend this product for puppies as it only meets AAFCO nutritional profiles for adult dogs.

  • sharon

    Hi Mike I manage a pet food specilty store.What is you views on feeding this food to puppies?We have alot of clients who want grain free for thier young dogs.

Get Free Recall Alerts by Email

Get Free Recall Alerts by Email

Receive lifesaving dog food recall alerts anytime there's a recall event in the U.S. or Canada.

You'll also get our best tips and ideas to help you feed your dog better... and safer.

No spam.  Unsubscribe anytime.

You have Successfully Subscribed!